YouthPort

Application Information

Applicant Serving as Fiscal Agent (Applicant Agency):

YouthPort

County:

Linn

Amount Requested:

$112,500

Director of Agency:

Contact Name:

Okpara Rice

Agency Name:

YouthPort

Phone:

319-365-9164

Fax:

Email:

Grant Contact/Project Director: 

These fields will appear blank of the previous question was answered "Yes" and the Grant Contact/Project Director is the same as the Director of Agency. 

Contact Name:

Megan Bogdan

Agency Name:

YouthPort

Phone:

319-640-4577

Fax:

Email:

DUNS Number:

024611155

Is the Grant Contact/Project Director the same contact as the Director of Agency?

No

2309 C St SW, Cedar Rapids 52404

Address:

2309 C St SW, Cedar Rapids 52404

Address:

Data Collection and Evaluation Contact:

Contact Name:

Miriam Landsman

Phone:

319-335-1257

Fax:

Email:

2662 Crosspark Road, Coralville 52241

Address:

Fiscal Contact:

Contact Name:

Brad Thatcher

Phone:

319-365-9164

Fax:

Email:

2309 C St SW, Cedar Rapids 52404

Address:

Iowa 21st Century Community Learning Centers Request for Applications FY22

Past Grantee Supplemental Application Information

Have you ever been in non-compliance (received a letter notice from Iowa Department of Education stating non-compliance) with 21CCLC rules and regulations in the past three years? 

No

Did you meet your attendance goals for the past two years? (21CCLC funded sites are required to meet their attendance goals at a rate of 70% in year one and 80% by year three)

Yes

Please provide your enrollment numbers for the last three years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

In 2020, there was a total enrollment of 118 (57 at Hoover, 61 at Taylor). In 2019, there was a total enrollment of 126 (69 at Hoover, 57 at Taylor). In 2018, there was a total enrollment of 134 (69 at Hoover, 65 at Taylor).

Please provide your average daily attendance for the last threes years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

The average daily attendance for the last three years is 99 students across both sites. This includes 55 at Hoover Elementary and 44 at Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary.

Did you meet your academic goals for the past two years?

Yes

How many of your local evaluation goals did you meet over the past two years?

100%

How much have office referrals been reduced over the past five years of your grant?

Over 50%

After 5 years, how many community partners for sustainability have been recruited?

More than 10

Have you exceeded the snack requirement, by providing a full meal?

Yes

Have you participated in required committee work in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

Have you attended required Professional Development in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

How many parent engagement meetings did you have in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

2

How many field trips did you provide in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

15

Have you provided children with the required snack?

Yes

Are you charging program fees to families?

No

Form Documentation

Legal Status of Applicant
Request for Competitive Priority
Minority Impact Statement
Private School Consultation Meeting Log
Sustainability Plan
Past Grantee Sustainability Form (if applicable)
Community Partner Official Notice
Assurances & Agreements Required of All Applicants
Collaborative Signatures

MOUs

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Proposal Narrative

Abstract (Not scored)

The number of students served:

150

The total amount requested per year:

$112,500

The total amount per student:

$750

Project Title: YouthPort 21st Century Community Learning Center

 

Student Needs: The neighborhoods served by Hoover Elementary School and Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary School have significant levels of poverty, which is reflected in high rates of free and reduced price lunch at these schools. Hoover Elementary is considered a Targeted School, and Taylor Elementary is considered a Comprehensive School by the State of Iowa. Both schools fall below state average for proficiency in reading and math, and Taylor is substantially lower than state average. For this reason, academic programming will largely focus on those two areas of study. Additional needs recognized include relationships, mental and emotional wellbeing, food insecurity and overall health, etc. These additional needs will be addressed through program components by engaging students, the entire family, and other stakeholders.

 

Competitive Priority Request: YouthPort is seeking competitive priority status in two areas. First, due to the Targeted and Comprehensive status of both schools, we are seeking competitive priority in that area. Second, the program will be offering a full meal and snack each day in partnership with the National School Lunch Programs at the participating schools. This will ensure all participating students are able to eat three meals per day at school.

 

Project: The YouthPort 21st Century Community Learning Center continues and expands existing programs while incorporating new, innovative ideas and responding to changing needs. The program serves youth and families most in need and incorporates activities for academic enrichment, family engagement and other enrichment activities. Other enrichment activities focus primarily on nutrition, physical health, mental and emotional wellbeing, and family literacy and involvement.

 

Research Base: Research was used to develop the components of this program, and it led to primary project components in the areas of academic performance, family literacy, physical health, and mental and emotional wellbeing. Power Hour, the main academic component, consists of homework assistance, targeted tutoring and educational enhancements. It helps students improve their grades and become self-directed learners. Ready to Read engages the entire family and leads to improved reading ability, increased self-esteem and confidence. Students are empowered and feel responsible for their own success. Triple Play works to improve overall health by increasing daily physical activity, teaching proper nutrition, and developing healthy relationships. Expressive Arts therapy uses art to help children explore their emotions, connect with their personal struggles, and boost communication and coping techniques. It supports building strong self-esteem through the use of music, visual arts and drama.

 

Management and Sustainability Plan: YouthPort will utilize a variety of staff positions and leadership groups to carry out its program. The YouthPort Advisory Group will engage school principals, school staff, students, YouthPort staff, volunteers, and representatives from partner agencies. This group will make large program decisions and provide guidance for program development, implementation and evaluation. YouthPort Resource Specialists will provide grant oversight, ensuring that timelines and commitments are met by all partner agencies and help provide a seamless transition of resources between agencies. Program Site Directors will plan and lead daily programs and activities. Volunteers will be engaged, including senior-level groups, to lead various educational activities and serve as tutors and mentors.

 

Communication Plan: YouthPort will utilize a variety of communication methods and regularly communicate with various stakeholders in the program and community at-large. Methods of communication will include newsletters, face-to-face communication, program presentations, surveys, questionnaires, email, social media and press releases.

 

Partnership: Various program partners will be engaged throughout the implementation of this program. However, YouthPort is, at its core, a collaborative effort between three primary agencies. They are Boys & Girls Clubs of the Corridor, YPN (Young Parents Network), and Tanager Place. Other primary project partners are Hoover Elementary School, Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary School, and Kirkwood Community College.

 

Evaluation: Various data points will be collected to help evaluate the success of the program and determine appropriate changes to make the program more effective. This will include regularly collected metrics, such as attendance, as well as surveys and assessment tools that measure changes over time. YouthPort will hire a local evaluator to evaluate the success of the program and comply with requirements for the 21CCLC grant.

 

Budget: YouthPort will be staffed in direct relation to programming and personnel needs. There are budgetary funds reserved for program supplies and activities, including family literacy programming. The required funds have been designated for data collection, and all categories with percentage limitations are in compliance with grant requirements.

Student Needs Assessments (20 possible points) 

The neighborhoods served by Hoover Elementary School and Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary School are some of the most impoverished areas of Cedar Rapids. This is reflected in the rates of Free and Reduced Price Lunch (FRPL) at each school. In the 2019-20 school year, Hoover Elementary had a total enrollment of 367, of which 82.7% were eligible for FRPL. Based on the project plan to serve 75 unique students (a total of 50 during the school year and 75 in the summer) at Hoover Elementary each year, this gives a proportional impact of 24.2% of students at the school eligible for FRPL that will be served by the 21CCLC program. For Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary, the 2019-20 school year total enrollment was 281, of which 89.7% were eligible for FRPL. Based on the project plan to serve 75 unique students at this school, as well, the proportional impact of the 21CCLC program here will be 36.8%.

 

Poverty can have substantial impacts on students and their ability to succeed in school. Families in poverty often are unable to provide adequate technology and support at home, impacting their children’s ability to keep up with schoolwork. While students are often provided with devices directly by their school, things like access to reliable and speedy Internet connection can still impact the ability to learn outside the classroom. Other factors that often impact academic success rates in elementary school students are nutrition/food access, overall health and physical fitness, mental wellbeing, etc. These are often correlated strongly with income level. For example, children from low-income families may not always have food in the home, leading them to going to bed hungry or getting inadequate nutrition outside of school meals. Due to the low-income status of many of the students at Hoover Elementary and Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary, there is an abnormally high need for academic support in these schools. According to the Iowa Department of Education website, Hoover Elementary School is designated as a Targeted school in year 2 of its performance improvement plan. Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary School is designated as a Comprehensive school in year 2 of its performance improvement plan.

 

YouthPort will seek to address many of these foundational student needs through its 21CCLC program. As will be addressed in the project description section, programming will address nutrition/food access, physical health, mental wellbeing, violence reduction/behavior improvement, etc. Throughout participation in the program, students will be ensured they receive three full meals per day, engage in adequate physical activity, receive support for mental and emotional wellbeing, etc. By providing safe program offerings on an ongoing basis for children and their families, YouthPort will work to improve academic success and outcomes for children within these schools.

 

Student Academic Achievement: The academic achievement of students at Hoover Elementary School and Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary School reflects the challenges faced by many of the kids that attend these schools. The average school composite score for reading on Iowa School Performance Profiles is 50. At Hoover Elementary School, the reading score is 47.22; at Taylor Elementary, the reading score is only 41.75. Hoover students have a 62% reading proficiency compared to the state average of 69.81%. Students at Taylor Elementary are significantly behind in reading proficiency with only 33.33% of student meeting proficiency standards. Math achievement scores are similar. The average school composite score for math on Iowa School Performance Profiles is also 50. At Hoover, their overall math score is 46.35; at Taylor, their overall math score is only 41.71. The State of Iowa average for proficiency in math is 70.16%. At Hoover, 63.33% of students are proficient in math; at Taylor, only 35.63% of students are proficient in math. At Hoover Elementary, the student population is largely made up of minority groups and students with additional challenges. 12.8% of enrolled students have disabilities, 27.2% are English learners, and 52.8% of the student population is black. At Taylor Elementary, despite the significantly lacking proficiency levels, student performance is even worse for those with disabilities. The school has an overall school index on Iowa School Performance Profiles of 45.49, but the index for students with disabilities is only 25.33.

 

In order to address the learning gaps experienced by students at the two program schools, YouthPort will focus academic activities largely on reading and math. Targeted homework assistance, tutoring and mentoring will help individual students to increase their comprehension and understanding of classroom materials. Additional instruction in the STEM area will provide enhanced learning opportunities that will help with math proficiency as well as science-related comprehension. More details on these activities are provided in the project description section.

 

In addition to direct instruction and engagement with students, YouthPort will address literacy through engagement of the entire family. This will include ongoing family literacy events hosted by YouthPort as well as general family programming, such as a Thanksgiving meal. These events will help keep parents informed about the program and what their children are doing as well as get the entire family actively engaged in the learning process for the students. YouthPort will also partner with Kirkwood Community College, the local community college in our area, to provide education resources to parents. YouthPort will work with Kirkwood to refer parents to their programs when appropriate. Ensuring that parents can increase their literacy, obtain high school-level degrees, and increase their credentials can help lift families out of poverty by leading to higher paying jobs for parents.

 

Other needs that will be addressed with this program relate to student behavior, relationships, mental and emotional wellbeing, etc. At Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary, there is a 92.9% attendance rate, which falls below the state average of 94.8%. At Hoover Elementary, there was a total of 36 suspensions last year, which is a significantly high rate. According to the student survey conducted by YouthPort in spring 2021, 23% of students in the program did not get along with people their age. 35% of students said they are not good at telling others about their ideas and feelings. 21% of students said they do not say “no” to things even if they know they are wrong. These indicators are related to behavior and are highly capable of being improved upon through afterschool programing. In the most recent year of YouthPort’s program funded by the 21CCLC, there were significant improvements from the beginning of the year to the end of the year in these indicators related to relationships, mental and emotional needs, etc. 82% of students improved in being able to identify their body sensations, feelings and thoughts and being able to sooth/regulate themselves. 82% of students also improved in being able to positively express themselves and their thoughts, feelings and needs to others. 86% improved at feeling good about themselves and feeling like they are capable and count in the world. 93% improved when asked if they felt they have good social skills and can get along well with others. Finally, 82% improved at feeling positively connected and engaged to at least one person in their lives.




Parents of students at both schools have identified transportation as a general need in their lives. This program addresses transportation through program structure in order to eliminate transportation as a barrier to participation. YouthPort is a neighborhood site-based model of programming, so all families are within walking distance of the program site. In the rare instances that further assistance with transportation is needed, YouthPort works directly with families on a case-by-base basis to find solutions that fit the needs of the families. YouthPort also works with families to meet needs for accessibility issues as needed. As the program is offered on-site in partnership with the schools where the kids already attend, many of the accessibility issues are addressed collaboratively to ensure students’ needs are met throughout the school day.

 

A variety of stakeholders were engaged through the process of creating this program, and they have been continually engaged as the program has progressed over the years. First, youth are extensively engaged by all three partner agencies through interviews and surveys. These methods gather input and information regarding in and out of school experiences. Information gathered here is used to develop and modify existing programming to most effectively meet the needs of the youth participants. Additionally, several youth members are engaged regularly through involvement of the Advisory Group.

 

YouthPort believes that strong and successful youth development programming requires a strong parent/family involvement. Parents from the Hoover and Taylor neighborhoods have been engaged with YouthPort since its inception, and this involvement will continue to be an integral part of YouthPort through quarterly parent input meetings.

 

The community is engaged through work with neighborhood associations. Each school has a correlating neighborhood association that brings together community stakeholders, parents and partners to meet the overarching needs of the community. Similarly, schools and educators are engaged by working directly with school principals and teachers to better understand where help is needed. Lastly, project partners are engaged throughout the implementation and evaluation of programming to determine possible improvements to program structure, offerings, etc.

Project (24 possible points) 

YouthPort is an innovative collaboration between three nonprofit agencies in Cedar Rapids: Boys and Girls Clubs of the Corridor, Tanager Place, and YPN (Young Parents Network). Each YouthPort partner agency has specific and unique experience in providing educational and related activities that will complement and enhance the academic performance, achievement, and positive youth development of students. The YouthPort agencies have more than 200 years of experience implementing successful youth and family programming, and the YouthPort program will allow for a continuation of these services while providing support for additional children and families. Specifically, YouthPort successfully implemented its program funded by the 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant within both Hoover and Taylor Elementary Schools for a 5-year period from 2016-2021. This direct experience demonstrates the agency’s ability to provide effective out-of-school time programming, impacting academics, offering enrichment, involving parents and families, and providing overall youth development practices.

 

In 2012, these three organizations recognized a need to close the achievement gap in Cedar Rapids schools and proposed to address this deficiency with a collaborative effort utilizing the strengths and expertise of each agency. This partnership developed into a natural referral structure for community services, and it eventually led to the inclusion of direct programming. This specific project is an outgrowth of this larger goal, building on the original agency partnerships to provide new supports to additional students in the community. The collaborative approach consists of an afterschool program structure that goes beyond academics to address social-emotional needs, physical wellness, and literacy and education needs of the larger family unit.

 

This comprehensive approach is fulfilled through programming offered five days a week, Monday through Thursday 3:45-6:00 and Fridays 2:20-6:00, with additional hours offered in evenings or weekends. While the weekday hours alone will not fulfill the minimum monthly hours, weekly programming is supplemented with Saturday activities to ensure the monthly minimum hours are met throughout the year. The summer program runs June through August for over 40 days per year. The summer session operates daily Monday through Friday from 8:30-5:30pm. Sites are located at Hoover Elementary School and Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary School. The program will serve 50 students at each school during the year and up to 75 at each site during the summer.

 

As part of programming, YouthPort will offer an afternoon snack and a full hot meal to each participating child daily. Before this program was started, lunch was often the last meal of the day for many of the children who attend Hoover and Taylor Elementary Schools. Offering a snack and dinner to these children ensure that they go home having another nutritious meal each day, which contributes to better health and overall better learning progress. These meals will be provided in partnership with the participating schools and Boys and Girls Clubs of the Corridor. Due to this partnership, meals will be provided following nutrition guidelines for the National School Lunch Program of the USDA.

 

The primary academic activities provided as part of this program will be Power Hour, tutoring and STEM learning. Power Hour provides homework assistance for students that need additional support. Volunteers and program staff work directly with students in a supervised and structured setting to complete assignments and understand material presented to them during the school day. Tutoring is an extension of this activity where students with additional academic support needs are able to receive extra help from teachers and volunteers with education backgrounds. Tutors are able to use various additional tools to help students achieve their academic goals, including online educational tools and individualized curriculum. Power Hour and tutoring are directly designed to address the significant need for increasing reading proficiency as demonstrated in the Student Need section. Finally, STEM learning activities are based on a variety of STEM classroom curriculum solutions that meet Iowa CORE Standards. They incorporate relevant hands-on activities delivered via student-focused learning processes. STEM activities help strengthen innovative thinking and prepare students to be the next generation of innovators and problem solvers. YouthPort partners with the Collins Aerospace Retiree Volunteers group to provide 


additional instructional support for STEM-related activities. This partnership also incorporates senior-level volunteers in a meaningful way. Incorporating STEM activities directly addresses the math proficiency issues at Hoover and Taylor elementary schools.

 

Family Literacy is addressed through the Ready to Read program. This program is a literacy building model based on research conducted at the University of Ohio that focuses on print knowledge, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and narrative to improve reading skills. The program involves all members of the family, and it includes individualized reading skill building taught by trained volunteers. These volunteers teach literacy building skills, incorporation of peer modeling, and incorporation of connected activities to strengthen cognitive connections. This program hosts events 5 times per year at each program site. The events last 90-120 minutes and include dinner for all participants. Each participant is sent home with 2 books and provided with 2 activities per book to assist parents with teaching reading skills at home. Increasing involvement of the entire family in strengthening reading skills is an effective way of improving the large gap in reading proficiency experienced in the two participating schools.

 

Additional family engagement events include an annual Thanksgiving meal at each site. This annual tradition brings together all families and has typically had very high participation from program member families. YouthPort has also partnered with Kirkwood Community College to provide referrals and support for parent education. Kirkwood has many adult education programs available to help adults achieve basic education credentials, such as attaining a high school equivalent diploma. Because this programming is supported by Federal HiSET funding, YouthPort relies on this partnership to avoid supplanting of federal funding with the 21CCLC funding request. YouthPort will refer family members and provide direct contact information to connect family members with this programming. Bettering the education and credentials of parents can lead to improved socioeconomic conditions in a household, which generally leads to improved educational outcomes for children in the home.

 

Based on the Youth Needs Assessment, YouthPort found that many participating youth lack the skills, resources, and ability to problem solve without resorting to violence or risky behavior, leading to office referrals and other delinquent behaviors. To address this, YouthPort has incorporated a variety of enrichment activities within its program. These include physical fitness programming, expressive arts therapy, drug and violence prevention, and a variety of community engagement, including field trips to arts and cultural venues and community service learning.

 

First, YouthPort partners with Tanager Place to provide regular expressive arts therapy activities. Licensed therapists work with the students through visual art and music therapy to explore their feelings and express their emotions. While this provides engaging activities that are often enjoyed by participants, it also helps them increase self-awareness, communication skills, and coping techniques.

 

Next, YouthPort partners with Boys and Girls Clubs of the Corridor to implement their Triple Play program. This comprehensive health and wellness program strives to improve the overall health of youth by increasing their daily physical activity, teaching them proper nutrition, and helping them develop healthy relationships. It incorporates regular physical activities and serves as the primary recreational aspect of the YouthPort program. This program has demonstrated results on a national level, and it has proven effective within our own community.

 

YouthPort will incorporate the SMART (Skills Mastery and Resilience Training) Moves program in partnership with the Boys and Girls Clubs of the Corridor. This prevention program uses a team approach that involves program staff, volunteers, mentors, parents, and other community representatives to address issues such as drug and alcohol usage and premature sexual activity. Activities are designed to develop resilience and refusal skills, assertiveness, strengthened decision making skills and ability to recognize peer and media influence. This program ultimately works to promote abstinence from substance abuse and sexual involvement through the practice and modeling of responsible behavior.

 

Additionally, YouthPort will incorporate regular opportunities for youth to engage in the community. This will include participation in arts and cultural events as well as community service engagement. Many of these opportunities will take place on Saturdays during the school year. For example, participants may attend a minor league hockey game at the Cedar Rapids Roughriders, or they might visit the African American Museum of Iowa for a special event during Black History Month. These activities are frequently offered in partnership with local arts and culture institutions through free admission, and they are tailored to fit the interests of the kids in the program.

 

The planned program activities align with the following eligible federal activities as provided in the Title IV, Part B Guidance: literacy and math (Power Hour, tutoring); literacy education programs (Power Hour, tutoring); tutoring services (Power Hour, tutoring); after-school activities for limited English proficient students that emphasize language skills and academic achievement (Power Hour, tutoring, Ready to Read); arts and music and cultural education activities (Expressive Arts, community engagement/field trips); healthy and active lifestyles (Triple Play); drug and violence prevention (SMART Moves); volunteer and community service (community service engagement); parenting skills programs that promote parental involvement and family literacy (Ready to Read, Kirkwood partnership); and supervised field trips (field trips and community events).

 

The overall goal of the academic enrichment activities is to provide academic support through afterschool programming, especially boosting the ability of students to become proficient in reading and math. This will be measured using the GPRA standards as required by the 21CCLC grant. YouthPort has an additional objective of ensuring students are receiving adequate STEM educational opportunities. The objective for the next year pertaining to this goal will be at least 75% of all enrolled students will participate in STEM activities at least weekly. Last year, we attained 100% compliance with this objective due to strong regular attendance by participants.

 

The overall goal of the enrichment activities is to introduce youth to concepts of service learning, enhancing social, emotional and behavioral development. Objectives tied to this overall goal include the following: 85% of youth members in programming will show progress in social/emotional development on 1 or more survey items when comparing pre-post test scores; Greater than 50% of youth in 


programming will show progress in social, emotional and behavioral development in the classroom and during programming; Youth will participate in group discussions and activities to help prevent risky behaviors; and youth will engage in physical activity daily and receive nutritional education to promote a healthy lifestyle.

 

The overall goal of the family literacy component of the YouthPort program is to increase the reading skills of individual families and increase their ability to continue their literacy improvements independently. This will include building literacy skills, incorporating peer modeling, and helping families to identify cognitive connections that boost comprehension of reading material. The main objective for this goal is to attain 80% of parents with increased or maintained knowledge of literacy skills.

 

YouthPort staff members coordinate directly with teachers and school staff to align program activities with school day instruction and meet desired educational standards. Teachers are often utilized for STEM activities and other instructional activities, ensuring activities align with school day instruction. YouthPort staff also collaborate directly and frequently with teachers to develop individualized learning plans for participants in the program. This is important to ensure the effectiveness of Power Hour and tutoring activities. Collaborative efforts help coordinate Ready to Read books and activities to support classroom material being presented at the time of the event. School staff are also included in frequent discussions to discuss school-wide intervention strategies, and they are involved in regular professional development trainings in collaboration with YouthPort. This close working partnership with teachers and other school staff members helps ensure that YouthPort program activities and school activities work together to best support the learning and achievement of students in the program.

Research Base (5 possible points)  

According to Youth.gov, research and practice has shown that regular attendance at intentionally planned Before and After School Programs (BASP) result in an increase in positive student regard for schooling, better participation, academic improvement, and social-emotional learning[1]. Specifically, students attending 21st Century Community Learning Centers improve their grades in reading and math. Data from YouthPort’s most recent local evaluation supports this outcome within our own program, with 41% increases in math and 52% increases in reading for those individuals deemed in need of improvement.

 

In addition to academic improvement, BASPs with social-emotional components have measurable positive impact on students. According to a 2013 study conducted at the University of California-Irvine[2], children with high levels of participation in afterschool programming that promoted social-emotional education experienced improvements in peer-to-peer social skills, motivation, effort, and positive states of mind. In the 2019-20 YouthPort Local Evaluation, 95% of students reported improvement in social/emotional development in at least one area.

 

Activities offered through our proposed program were intentionally selected due to their proven effectiveness with our targeted population. Examples include:

 

Power Hour, a Boys and Girls Clubs of the Corridor program, has proven to help youth improve grades and become self-directed learners through homework assistance, tutoring, and educational enhancement. According to the American Institutes for Research, developing good study and homework practices can lead to better academic achievement[3]. Power Hour includes educational enhancement materials designed to take advantage of young people' s curiosity and help them become self-directed learners.

 

Expressive Arts Therapy has shown to help children cope with behavioral disorders as well as anger and control issues through techniques such as music and visual arts. Expressive arts therapy uses art to help children connect to their personal struggles, giving them a voice, increasing communication and helping them learn new coping techniques[4]. Expressive Arts Therapy has helped youth cope with the following issues: Anxiety, ADD, ADHD, Depression, Migraine Headaches and Rage.

 

Ready to Read, an early literacy project involving families, was developed by YPN. Ready to Read includes individualized skill building done with parents and children by a trained volunteer and book incentives. YPN’s program experience has shown that when a family has books in the home, they are more likely to read to their children and that when books are paired with an activity, a stronger cognitive connection is made. When families attend a Ready to Read event, they will leave with a minimum of two new books and an activity that partners with each story. Additionally, parents receive both verbal and written instructions and guidance through a trained volunteer mentor to implement with their child later in the home.

 

Overall, the YouthPort program is founded on proven principles of successful BASP programs, and our demonstrated results show positive impact in our own community.

 

[1] https://youth.gov/youth-topics/afterschool-programs/benefits-youth-families-and-communities

[2] Pierce, K. M., Auger, A., & Vandell, D. L. (2013, April). Narrowing the achievement

gap: Consistency and intensity of structured activities during elementary school. Paper

presented at the Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting,

Seattle, WA; Vandell, D. (2012). California afterschool outcome measures project

field test of the online toolbox: Final report to California Department of Education.

Irvine, CA: University of California, Irvine.

22 Lerner, R., & Lerner, J. (2013). The positive

[3] https://sedl.org/pubs/sedl-letter/v20n02/homework.html

[4] http://www.growingupeasier.org/index.php?main_page=page&id=152&chapter=3

Management and Sustainability Plan (20 points) 

The management of YouthPort includes highly-qualified staff, continued professional development, effective leadership, a group of active stakeholders, and plans for program evaluation, improvement, and sustainability.

 

Highly-Qualified Staff: The staffing structure of the YouthPort program will include:

YouthPort Advisory Group – The advisory group includes principals from participating schools, school staff, parents, students, Program Site Directors, designated program volunteers and representatives from each of the partner agencies. This group will be responsible for making program decisions and providing guidance and direction for program development, implementation, and evaluation. This will include the hiring of program-specific staff members.

YouthPort Resource Specialist (YRS) - The YRS will ensure the process of providing a seamless transition of resources between all agencies and management of the referral system. This will be done through monthly leadership meetings between agency staff and uplifting any needs or action items to the YouthPort Advisory Group, along with the respective Directors of each agency. The YRS will attend meetings during the school day and after school at Taylor and Hoover Elementary Schools to maintain alignment with school day instruction.

Program Site Directors – These individuals are hired by the Advisory Group to provide grant oversight and ensure that timelines and commitments are met by all partner agencies as well as provide day-to-day management of the YouthPort program.

Youth Program Assistants – High quality staff from the schools will be hired so that a 15:1 student to staff ratio can be maintained. We will enlist the help of each school’s principal to recruit school staff, specifically in the areas of math and reading. Other youth program assistants will include part time staff from BGCC and one staff member from both YPN and Tanager Place. The youth program assistants will provide direct program services to both youth and families.

Volunteers (including senior-aged volunteers) – YouthPort will recruit senior volunteers from service clubs throughout Cedar Rapids. Additional recruitment will be done at volunteer fairs, area colleges, and the Collins Aerospace retiree volunteer program, specifically engaging senior-aged volunteers. YouthPort will also utilize the volunteer base of all three primary partner agencies. All volunteers will be required to apply for and undergo a screening with full background checks to ensure the safety of all youth. Once the application process is completed, all volunteers will support programming activities in a variety of ways such as helping students with homework, reading with students, and supervising sports and family night activities. Volunteers will be actively engaged with the students to ensure high retention.

 

Professional Development: Professional Development activities include extensive, ongoing staff development at the program level. Each staff member will undergo 10 hours of pre-service orientation each fall and complete four educational trainings throughout the school year. An additional 10 hours of pre-service orientation will be required prior to summer programming each year.

 

Both orientation sessions will integrate basic knowledge of child development with essential areas for developing effective programs. Staff trainings will be led by the Program Site Directors and will include content from the 21stCentury Community Learning Center grant requirements, The Search Institute’s 40 Developmental Assets, data collection procedures and practices, and program specific information regarding academic and social-emotional curriculum and strategies.

 

In addition, the Program Site Directors will attend two 21st Century Community Learning Center meetings, the State of Iowa conference as well as the National conference in Washington DC. Both conferences will ensure staff are trained to continue running the program effectively. Other professional development will include weekly meetings and/or staff training for support staff and volunteers. These sessions will provide time for support staff and volunteers to discuss problems and learn best practices so they can better assist with daily activities. Lastly, each partner agency will provide professional development trainings for staff, including topics such as relationship enhancement, youth development, youth mental health first aid, etc. For example, Tanager Place included YouthPort staff members in its Leadership Academy professional development course in 2019-20, offering in-depth professional development for YouthPort staff.

 

Program Site Directors will oversee day-to-day activities of the YouthPort program including continuous improvement and leadership of staff and volunteers. This leadership structure includes management operations, recruiting and professional development of staff, curriculum development aligned with the school day, partner and non-public school scheduling, and communication. These efforts will be supported through monthly meetings where staff will meet collaboratively with the Principals and Curriculum Specialists to provide ongoing program and school coordination.

 

Youth Development staff are qualified and experienced direct service providers. Each organization maintains quality staff with administrative experience in implementing successful youth programming. The Program Site Directors, who will be responsible for program development and management, will be of similar quality and experience. Support staff and volunteers will ensure sufficient resources for program and student supervision. All staff will participate in a minimum of 10 hours of professional development during the school year and 10 hours of professional development during the summer to maintain staff competency. Staff will have performance evaluated regularly and will undergo formal peformance reviews annually.

 

YouthPort has been successful in maintaining low staff turnover, and we will continue efforts to limit turnover going forward. We will do this through weekly meetings with staff, giving them an opportunity to provide input for planning and implementation of programs and instilling a sense of ownership of the program. Staff and volunteers will be given a questionnaire to complete prior to joining the YouthPort Program, gathering information on individual interest areas and allowing for the proper placement of staff and volunteers within those areas of the program.

 



Transportation, Building and Site Security and Accessibility:

Transportation: Transportation is not required on a daily basis for participants because the program is hosted on site at the schools where targeted students attend. Additionally, the neighborhood structure of this program ensures schools are within walking distance of home for participants. This is especially important during summer months when school is not in session. In special circumstances, YouthPort will arrange transportation for those that require it. Between all of the cooperating agencies, YouthPort has access to multiple vans and one 30-passenger bus. The partner agencies also maintain relationships and agreements with local transportation vendors to arrange for additional transportation as needed. For field trips, YouthPort will coordinate with the partner schools to secure the usage of a bus and driver.

 

Site Security: Students are checked in and out daily by a front desk staff member. All entrances and exits are monitored by staff. Policies and procedures are in place to provide safety in the event of a fire, tornado, intruder, etc. YouthPort programming is hosted on sites that are equipped with modern accessibility features for those with physical disabilities, and modern security functions are in place.

 

Accessibility: YouthPort is open to all students regard to race or ethnicity. The overall number of English Language Learners (ELL) in the CRCSD is only 6.7%. However, the ELL rate at Hoover Elementary is 35.5%, greatly signifying a need for support at that school. To address this need, the CRCSD provides a Parent Education Program for ELL families at Hoover Elementary that also serves surrounding neighborhoods. In its staffing and hiring practices, YouthPort strives to hire individuals or connect with staff at its partner agencies that speak multiple languages. This allows for individuals to act as tutors and support those families who are less fluent in English.

 

YouthPort also provides inclusion for students of all physical and learning disabilities. All schools are accessible for students with physical disabilities. For students with learning disabilities, extra help is provided through partnerships with the participating schools and the CRCSD. YouthPort strives to understand each child’s unique needs and provide solutions to help students with learning disabilities to participate and succeed in our programming.

 

Stakeholder Group:

The YouthPort Advisory Group will consist of: principals from participating schools; school staff from participating schools; parents and students from participating schools; Program Site Directors, designated program volunteers; and representatives from each of the partner agencies. Individuals for this advisory group are identified and recruited by executive directors of the three partnership agencies as well as YouthPort program staff.

 

This group of people will be responsible for making program decisions and providing guidance and counsel relating to program development, implementation and evaluation. This group will meet monthly and as needed to carry out the following functions: 1) Evaluate outcomes, timelines and align program with CRCSD and 21st CCLC standards; 2) Provision of technical support and leadership opportunities; 3) Represent the best interests of the neighborhood families; 4) Monitor student and parent participation; 5) Provide guidance relating to program development, implementation and evaluation. As part of this responsibility, the Advisory Group will also monitor program leadership and employee retention. Should leadership or staff changes arise, the Advisory Group will ensure continued high-quailty staffing for the duration of the grant period.

 

To aid the Advisory Group in making informed decisions, the Program Site Directors will coordinate ongoing student assessments. The assessments will be in the form of surveys to assess the effectiveness of the YouthPort Program. This feedback will be instrumental in guiding the program offerings within the guidelines of allowable 21CCLC activities and improving existing services.

 

Continuous Improvement Plan:

The YouthPort Program Directors and YouthPort Advisory Group have committed to a continuous improvement plan. The primary measurement tool used in this plan will be the United Way of East Central Iowa’s Positive Youth Development Survey. Given to participants pre- and post-programming, this evaluation tool will measure the development of skills pertaining to 21st Century Community Learning Center requirements, youth connection to the program, positive adult-youth relationships, perception of academic success and cultural competence levels. The YouthPort Advisory Group will collaborate with United Way and its partner agencies to understand the results of this survey and determine the next steps to ensure improvement in outcomes, program quality, and staff effectiveness.

 

Sustainability Planning:

The collective knowledge and experince held by the three YouthPort partner agencies in sustaining community programming is extensive and thorough. Sustainability efforts are particularly important to building community support for the program to sustain it over time, avoiding supplanting of federal funding and making good use of taxpayer resources. The partner agencies have strong track records of financially sustaining successful youth programming through contributed revenue and grant funding. The partnership with these agencies ensures added knowledge and fundraising backgrounds to support YouthPort in sustainability efforts.

 

Community partnerships are vital to the long term sustainability of youth programming like that offered by YouthPort. There is tremendous value associated with in-kind contributions and programming support offered by partners, such as space, goods, materials, volunteer assistance, etc. During the most recent school year, YouthPort partnered with 33 agencies, businesses, faith-based organizations, health care providers, and governmental entities to support 21CCLC programming. These partnerships, along with funding from the 21CCLC grant, other secured contributions and grants, and supplemental funding from its three main partner agencies, has allowed YouthPort to build sustainable programming through its first five years.

 



The afterschool program will continue these efforts by implementing four main pillars of sustainability: community partnerships, school partnerships, volunteer contributions, and summer collaborations. YouthPort continues to pursue sustainable funding sources by building relationships with local foundations and private donors. These efforts have allowed YouthPort to incrementally grow its partnerships over the first five years of the project, including securing cash and in-kind donations to help the program move toward self-sustainability. Our partnership with the Cedar Rapids Community School District is instrumental because the district administration and school principals value what the program provides to youth and family served. We have established ongoing partnerships with the district and other community programs, such as Kids on Course University, to sustain our summer programming long term. Finally, volunteers are critical to improving the lives of young people in our community. Not only do they offer logistical and educational support, but they help maintain a sense of community within the children and families in the program.

Communication Plan (5 possible points)

Partnerships (10 possible points) 

YouthPort was formed as an innovative collaborative partnership between Boys & Girls Clubs of the Corridor, YPN and Tanager Place. The goal of this effort was to meet community needs in a more comprehensive manner, empowering families and strengthening neighborhoods in the process. YouthPort provides a “safe harbor” for families and those living in at-risk neighborhoods, providing coordinated education and supportive services. Initiatives offered through YouthPort include:

  • Before and after school care and educational programming for neighborhood children and specific disadvantaged groups

  • Providing a network of professional support and education for young parents

  • Providing daily nutritious meals for at-risk youth

  • Connections to professional mental health and wellbeing services

 

The collaborating agencies have nearly 200 years of combined experience and have proven their ability to work collaboratively to provide exceptional programming for disadvantaged youth in the community. Each individual partner agency has a demonstrated and lengthy commitment to providing quality youth development programing. The top executive from each collaborative partner and principals from each participating school site serve on the YouthPort Advisory Group. This group has taken YouthPort from an idea to real impact and results in a matter of years, boosting the offerings of effective afterschool programs in our community. This effective working relationship between the YouthPort partner agencies has allowed for a safe, caring environment for youth to thrive.

 

Boys & Girls Clubs of the Corridor (BGCC) will lead YouthPort through oversight of its 21st Century Community Learning Centers funded programing. BGCC was established 28 years ago and provides quality youth development programing in Linn and Johnson Counties. The agency currently serves approximately 300 youth participants each day at five sites located in the metro area. BGCC provides a positive place for youth to go after school and during the summer, effectively keeping kids off the streets and out of trouble. Their success has been recognized by club members regularly receiving distinctions as State of Iowa Youth of the Year and winners of national Boys & Girls Clubs of America competitions.

 

BGCC will be responsible for the delivery and oversight of the academic success of youth through the Power Hour homework program. They will also incorporate the Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s Triple Play program for physical fitness and overall health to foster physically healthy youth. Additional activities and initiatives offered to youth in the program include, but are not limited to, tutoring, technology, fine arts, life skills, STEM, physical fitness, chess, etc.

 

YPN (formerly Young Parents Network) is a vital community resource in Cedar Rapids with expertise in prevention-based programming for children, youth and families. Founded in 1985, YPN has been serving the community for over 36 years. YPN has youth development staff that are trained and certified in the 40 Developmental Assets Framework from the Search Institute, which is a nationally recognized leader in the area of Youth Development. Developmental Asset programing has been implemented with great success in both classroom and out-of-school settings for over 15 years. This expertise will help drive the youth enrichment programing components led by YPN. In addition to youth programing, YPN will use their expertise in parent development and support to offer resources for families, such as classes and workshops on the importance of parent involvement.

 

Tanager Place has been serving eastern Iowa for over 142 years, offering a variety of services to help children and families succeed. Today, Tanager Place offers a comprehensive lineup of mental wellbeing services to help children and families struggling with mental and behavioral health concerns. Services include residential inpatient treatment, outpatient clinical service, community-based treatment services, multiple prevention and afterschool/summer youth programs, and community outreach. Tanager Place serves over 4000 unduplicated individual children each year. For this project, Tanager Place will meet the mental and behavioral health needs for participating youth and families. They will regularly provide expressive arts therapy and will offer direct connection to individualized services for children that need additional mental or behavioral health support. Additionally, they will provide accounting and fiscal services for this project.

 

Hoover Elementary and Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary will play a vital role in this project. They will provide space for program activities at their physical locations. They will also collect and share data regarding student grades, attendance, Iowa assessments, etc. They will also provide information for students in need from all participating schools, ensuring YouthPort can connect with the students most in need of the additional support provided by this program.

 


Kirkwood Community College will provide resources for adult education and literacy as part of the family engagement requirements for this grant. In order to avoid supplanting federal funds, YouthPort will work with Kirkwood to refer adults from participating families to their programs that involve HiSET funding. This will help parents further their educations and improve the socioeconomic standing of their families.

 

Other partners – various other project partners will be involved in providing program space, leading activities, and providing logistical and financial support. Examples of project partners used in the past include Collins Aerospace (STEM education activities), Cedar Rapids Public Library (literacy resources), Eastern Iowa Arts Academy (fine arts activities), Chess Club (program activities), Maranatha Bible Church (program space), St. Mark’s United Methodist Church (program space), YMCA (recreational activities), etc. All services provided by additional project partners will assist in meeting YouthPort goals in serving youth and families.

 

Partner Engagement Plan: The three YouthPort founding agencies have been successful in sustaining programing through various economic and community conditions for many years. The YouthPort Advisory Group, made up of representatives from each partner agency and various community members, will assume the responsibility for long-term sustainability and partner engagement. Overall, this will include both short and long term planning for recruiting new partners, sustaining current partner relationships, and engaging families to foster strong participation. Partner recruitment will be done by leveraging knowledge and relationships from the collaborative agencies, their Boards of Directors, volunteers, etc. The Advisory Group and program staff members, will work to leverage additional funding through grant funding, fundraising events, local business and foundation support, and charitable contributions from individuals. Relationships with project partners will be used to foster sustainable financial support from local businesses, addressing the need to increase community support for the program and avoid long-term supplanting of federal funding.

Evaluation (10 possible points) 

YouthPort will collect crucial data throughout the year to inform program planning and evaluate impact. As required, YouthPort will collect all 14 data measurements pertaining to the GPRA measures, as applicable. YouthPort uses a variety of assessment methods to gather and report this data. The Functional Analysis Screening Tool (FAST) is used to measure improvement in math, improvement in English and improvement in proficiency. Teacher surveys are used to measure improvement in homework and class participation as well as student behavior. Student behavior will also be confirmed through changes in student office referrals.

 

One of the main program evaluation tools that will be used is the United Way of East Central Iowa’s Positive Youth Development Survey (ECIPYDS) pre- and post-programming. This will measure the development of skills pertaining to 21st Century Community Learning Center requirements, youth connection to the program, positive adult-youth relationships, perception of academic success and cultural competence levels. This evaluation tool is considered a best practice tool, and project partners YPN and Boys and Girls Clubs of the Corridor have extensive experience utilizing and implementing this evaluation tool.

 

Overall data to be collected will include:

  • Student data from bi-annual standardized assessment results on proficiency levels in reading and math

  • Student level data regarding attendance in and feedback on after-school enrichment activities

  • Student level data regarding attendance in the regular school day program

  • Teacher Feedback and Tracking Tool

  • Parent attendance and feedback on parent learning activities

In addition to the required GPRA measurements, YouthPort does further evaluation of local objectives that more effectively capture the needs in our community. This local evaluation includes collection of data as well as qualitative feedback gathered through surveys and discussions with parents, school staff, community members, and participants. The CRCSD has agreed to release assessment data of the students involved in the program. YouthPort will coordinate all elements of the project’s evaluation plan, including collection of data from CRCSD, evaluating data to monitor success, and reporting data to the Advisory Group and community at large. All collected data will be reported to the state, as required. This local evaluation is then used to inform the design, direction and implementation of the program to most effectively serve the unique needs of our community.

 

Primary program objectives measured for local evaluations are centered on four areas. They include participation in academic programming, improvements in youth social and emotional skills and behavior, increasing staff knowledge, and parent literacy opportunities. In the 2019-20 school year, metrics included the following:

  • 70% of all enrolled students will participate in STEM activities a minimum of weekly.

  • 85% of youth members in programming will show progress in social/emotional development on 1 or more survey items when comparing pre-post test scores

  • Greater than 50% of youth in programming will show progress in social, emotional and behavioral development in the classroom and during programming

  • All staff supported by or connected with the 21CCLC program will receive 12 hours of continuous education throughout the school year.

  • 80% of parents will increase or maintain knowledge of literacy skills


Measured through a combination of pre- and post-tests and surveys, all of these objectives were met in the 2019-2020 school year. The examples listed above are adjusted each school year based on knowledge learned in the previous year and changing community and school needs.

 

As required by the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program, YouthPort will contract with an experienced evaluator to conduct an official local evaluation. As a previous grantee, YouthPort has developed a working relationship with Dr. Miriam J. Landsman, Ph.D. Dr. Landsman is the Executive Director of the National Resource Center for Family Centered Practice, Co-Director of 


the Iowa Consortium for Substance Abuse Research and Evaluation, and an Associate Professor at the University of Iowa. She holds a Masters of Social Work from the University of Iowa as well as a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Iowa. She has significant experience in evaluating the effectiveness of youth programming, and she has specific experience in meeting Local Evaluation requirements for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant. She will assist YouthPort in conducting a comprehensive, rigorous evaluation of our program, both at the local level and in cooperation with the Iowa Department of Education. We fully intend to provide all requested data and program information to the State of Iowa in a timely and complete manner.

 

Each fall, following completion of the Local Evaluation of the previous year, YouthPort will post its evaluation report on its website and shared with parents, project partners, and community members through various forms of communication. This report is provided as a PDF that is easy to download, view and understand. Hard copies of the report will be available upon request. Evaluation results are then used during annual planning to refine, improve and strengthen the YouthPort program and foster increased community support.

Budget Narrative (10 possible points) 

YouthPort’s program will be staffed in direct relation to programming and personnel needs. Total Personnel Costs are calculated using the staffing breakdown listed below:

  • YouthPort Resource Specialist (YRS): 1 FTE dedicated to coordinating YouthPort’s program – 85% of this position’s time spent on 21CCLC grant – Annual Salary of $41,616*0.85 = $35,373.60

  • Program Site Directors: 1 FTE dedicated to each site with an annual salary of $37,600 (Hoover) and $35,600 (Taylor). The UD is employed by BGCC.

  • Youth Program Assistants: 2 PTEs with costs calculated as follows: 2 hours daily * 179 days * $10/hour * 2 associates = $7,160

  • FICA (Payroll Tax) = 7.65% of salary/wages

  • Total Staffing Costs Directly Attributed = ($35,373.60 + $37,600 + $35,600 + $7,160) * 1.0765 = $124,587.22

Materials & Supplies: The budget has some reserved funds for expendables related to day-to-day programming. These materials include activity supplies, homework supplies, and any other necessary items used in programming. Each partner will provide a portion of materials. The total cost for this budget item is $5,000.

 

Within the Materials & Supplies category, Family Literacy funds provide literacy instructional materials, books for distribution, and miscellaneous supplies needed for our family literacy programming. Of the $5,000 allocated for materials and supplies, $1,500 is specifically set aside for Family Literacy activities.

 

Professional Development: The Unit Director and up to one other staff member will attend the 21CCLC-prescribed conferences. Resource materials such as curriculum and training manuals for the enrichment programs will be accounted for in this line item as well. The total budget for professional development activities is $7,561, which equates to to 5% of the overall budget as required by the 21CCLC grant.

 

Transportation: Funds will be used to cover the expenses such as fuel, staff mileage for transport, and repairs related to program access. BGCC has several vans and a bus that will be used to transport youth for any off-site activities. Categorized under student access, transportation costs are budgeted at $1,500 for the year, or approximately 1% of the budget. This is well under the maximum allowable expense of 8%. Since the programming takes place primarily on-site at the schools where students attend, there is a significant cost savings here because the schools already ensure safety and accessibility of their facilities.

 

Evaluation: The necessary funds have been designated to data collection, data analysis, and the creation of any of the necessary reporting documents are accounted for here. Program data and evaluation will be ongoing in this program to ensure that programming is continuously adjusting to meet the needs of the youth and that the highest quality of programming is being achieved. Data will be reported to the Advisory Group and all requested documentation will be submitted to the Department of Education in a timely fashion. Funds for evaluation are budgeted at $3,500 overall, which equates to 2.3% of the budget, which is less than the 4% maximum allowable expense.

 

Indirect Costs: Administrative costs include printing, telephone, liability insurance, accounts payable services, and all other indirect costs associated with employment of program staff as well as all of the vendor contracts necessary to ensure the quality of the project. Indirect costs are budgeted at $9,000 overall, which is approximately 6% of the budget. This is less than the maximum allowable expense of 8% annually.

 

Application Program seeks to supplement not supplant: YouthPort is an extension of services at Taylor and Hoover Schools. As this program has progressed over the 5 year period since it was first awarded the 21CCLC grant, it has built support from community partners and its 3 partner agencies to support the program financially. This is reflected in the significant partner costs for personnel and professional development in form D3. The three partner agencies have utilized their own fundraising capabilities to raise support for these expenses to avoid supplanting Federal funding. There are also significant in-kind resources as referenced in the narrative for this funding proposal. These in-kind resources include: program space at schools, access to food from schools through the National School Lunch Program, field trip tickets from various area cultural and sporting institutions, financial accounting support from Tanager Place, etc. This project is made possible through broad-based partnerships from many entities in our community, and YouthPort will continue to foster these partnerships and develop sustainable resources to support this program into the future.

Supplemental Materials

View Document

Before School (BS) Site Operations

Estimated Start Date:

August 29, 2022

Estimated End Date:

May 31, 2023

Total Number of Service Days:

NA

Total hours of Before School services per typical week:

NA

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Saturday

NA

NA

NA

After School (AS) Site Operations

Total hours of After School services per typical week:

15

Total Number of Service Days:

160

Estimated End Date:

May 31, 2023

Estimated Start Date:

August 29, 2022

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

3:45pm

3:45pm

3:45pm

3:45pm

2:20pm

6:00pm

6:00pm

6:00pm

6:00pm

6:00pm

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

3.66

Saturday

4:00pm

8:00pm

4

Summer (SUM) Site Operations

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

8:30am

8:30am

8:30am

8:30am

8:30am

5:30pm

5:30pm

5:30pm

5:30pm

5:30pm

9

9

9

9

9

Saturday

NA

NA

NA

Estimated Start Date:

June 12, 2023

Estimated End Date:

August 11, 2023

Total Number of Service Days:

43

Total hours of Summer services per typical week:

45

Adult Family Member Services

All 21CCLC programs are required to host a minimum of four family-centered events each year. A general rule of thumb is one per quarter. Examples of events include back-to-school celebrations, literacy nights, family game nights, recreational events, guest speakers, and so on. 

Describe Frequency, Duration, and Dosage:

YouthPort hosts 5 literacy night family engagement events annually per site. At these events, each participant receives 2 book and 2 activities per book. Dinner is provided to families at these events. Each Thanksgiving, approximately 50 adults and their children join together for a Thanksgiving meal.

Estimated Total Number of Adult Family Members Served:*
Total Number of Family Events*
School Name

Hoover Elementary School

5

100

Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary

5

100

Form D1: 21CCLC Application Funding Request Summary
 

21CCLC TOTAL FUNDING REQUEST 

(Before and/or After School and Summer Program Funds) 

2

Number of program sites included in this application:

150

Total number of students being served (all sites for one year):

$112,500

Total first-year funding request (all sites):

Total three-year funding request (all sites):

$337,500

FUNDING FOR EACH SITE INCLUDED IN THIS APPLICATION 

NOTE: A program site may serve students from many schools. For example, a location that serves students from three (3) different schools would be considered one Program Site. 

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

Hoover Elementary School

$45,000

$45,000

$45,000

$135,000

50

Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary

$45,000

$45,000

$45,000

$135,000

50

School Year

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

Hoover Elementary School

$11,250

$11,250

$11,250

$33,750

75

Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary

$11,250

$11,250

$11,250

$33,750

75

Summer School

Form D4: Applicant Agency’s Fiscal Resource Information 

It is recommended that each applicant, including school districts, public entities, or government agencies, possess sufficient fiscal resources in order to start up and operate the program being requested for a period of up to three months. Please indicate if you are a public entity or a private/non-profit by checking the appropriate box below and then use the text box at the bottom of the page to answer the questions regarding fiscal resources for start-up costs and operational costs. 

Private Entity

In the textbox below, please describe your funding sources that can be used to start up and operate the program for up to three months. For example, public entities should include their budget line item number, account numbers, or any other applicable references. Private organizations should describe cash, lines of credit, emergency loans, etc. Fiscal resource information should be specific (e.g., bank or lender names; name of the holder of the account).

 

* Note: If you do not have the financial resources available equal to the amount of funding you are requesting, you do not have the financial capacity for this project. Agencies that do not have adequate fiscal resources on hand are eligible to participate in the application process. However, the applicant must describe in this section the agency’s plan to secure the necessary fiscal resources for this program application. 

Through its partnership with Tanager Place, who provides financial accounting and payroll support, YouthPort has access to significant cash resources and line of credit resources. At any given time, Tanager Place holds approximately $1.5M in its bank accounts at Cedar Rapids Bank & Trust to support positive cash flow within its operations. Additionally, it has a line of credit at Cedar Rapids Bank & Trust with a $3M limit. Tanager Place is not currently drawn upon this line of credit.

To view Forms D2 and D3, click the "View Document" buttons below. PDF versions are included at the end of this document but the information may not be split into multiple pages. 
 

Basic Service Components

If location for the program is different from the school where children attend, list both below:

Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary takes place on site as well as at Maranatha Bible Church located at 526 3rd Ave SW, Cedar Rapids, IA 52404

School or Site/Building Name:

Hoover Elementary takes place on site as well as at St. Mark's United Methodist Church located at 4700 Johnson Avenue NW, Cedar Rapids, IA 52405

School or Site/Building Name:

School or Site/Building Name:
Do you plan to provide any of the following to meet the nutrition/food access needs of students?

Full meal (best practice), Snack (required by federal statute)

Do you plan to follow best practices?

Yes, we will provide a free program to at-risk students in poverty as outlined in the guidance and consistent with the priority description in the application. All students on FRPL will attend for free. Best Practice is that applicants serve a minimum of 50% of FRPL children at each school in the application to receive the bonus points.

 
 

Site Information 

2022-2025 Site Profile 

YouthPort

School/Agency Name:

School Name
(can apply for up to 3 sites) 
School-Wide Information 

Grades Served by School 

Total Enrollment 

Free and Reduced Lunch Rate 

# Targeted Students 

Grades Served by Program 

BS

AS

SUM

Target Schools

Hoover Elementary School

K-5

367

82.7%

K-5

0

50

75

Cedar River Academy at Taylor Elementary

K-5

281

89.7%

K-5

0

50

75

Total:

0

100

150