Siouxland Human Investment Partnership (SHIP)

Application Information

Applicant Serving as Fiscal Agent (Applicant Agency):

Siouxland Human Investment Partnership (SHIP)

County:

Woodbury

Amount Requested:

$208,500

Director of Agency:

Contact Name:

Matt Ohman

Agency Name:

SHIP

Phone:

712-222-6389

Fax:

Email:

Grant Contact/Project Director: 

These fields will appear blank of the previous question was answered "Yes" and the Grant Contact/Project Director is the same as the Director of Agency. 

Contact Name:

Jenna Andrews

Agency Name:

Beyond the Bell

Phone:

712-277-3600

Fax:

712-277-3610

Email:

DUNS Number:

02-625-85153

Is the Grant Contact/Project Director the same contact as the Director of Agency?

No

1520 Morningside Ave, Sioux City 51106

Address:

2500 Glenn Ave Suite 78, Sioux City 51106

Address:

Data Collection and Evaluation Contact:

Contact Name:

Consulting By Design

Phone:

612-804-3417

Fax:

Email:

PO Box 2698, Sioux City 51106

Address:

Fiscal Contact:

Contact Name:

Matt Ohman

Phone:

712-222-6389

Fax:

Email:

1520 Morningside Ave, Sioux City 51106

Address:

Iowa 21st Century Community Learning Centers Request for Applications FY22

Past Grantee Supplemental Application Information

Have you ever been in non-compliance (received a letter notice from Iowa Department of Education stating non-compliance) with 21CCLC rules and regulations in the past three years? 

No

Did you meet your attendance goals for the past two years? (21CCLC funded sites are required to meet their attendance goals at a rate of 70% in year one and 80% by year three)

Yes

Please provide your enrollment numbers for the last three years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

2017-18 school year 90
2018-2019 school year- 88
2019-2020 school year- 75

Please provide your average daily attendance for the last threes years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

2017-18 school year-62
2018-19 school year 64
2019-20 school year 60

Did you meet your academic goals for the past two years?

Yes

How many of your local evaluation goals did you meet over the past two years?

100%

How much have office referrals been reduced over the past five years of your grant?

Over 50%

After 5 years, how many community partners for sustainability have been recruited?

More than 25

Have you exceeded the snack requirement, by providing a full meal?

No

Have you participated in required committee work in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

Have you attended required Professional Development in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

How many parent engagement meetings did you have in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

9

How many field trips did you provide in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

24

Have you provided children with the required snack?

Yes

Are you charging program fees to families?

No

Form Documentation

Legal Status of Applicant
Request for Competitive Priority
Minority Impact Statement
Private School Consultation Meeting Log
Sustainability Plan
Past Grantee Sustainability Form (if applicable)
Community Partner Official Notice
View Document
Assurances & Agreements Required of All Applicants
Collaborative Signatures

MOUs

Applicants were required to upload at least 5 and up to 10 MOUs. Not all buttons below will have an MOU attached. 

MOU Upload 1
MOU Upload 2
 MOU Upload 3
MOU Upload 4
MOU Upload 5
MOU Upload 6
MOU Upload 7
View Document
MOU Upload 8
View Document
MOU Upload 9
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MOU Upload 10
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Proposal Narrative

Abstract (Not scored)

The number of students served:

165

The total amount requested per year:

$208,500.00

The total amount per student:

$1,263.63

Before and After School Site and summer: Loess Hills Elementary- 75 school year students and 30 summer students

West Middle School- 40 school year and 20 summer students

Competitive Priority:

· Siouxland Human Investment Partnership (SHIP) offers school age programming through the Beyond the Bell (BTB) program. SHIP and BTB are collaborating with the Sioux City Community School District (SCCSD) to jointly submit this 21CCLC grant application.

· West Middle School (WMS) is designated as “Targeted Year 2” on the Iowa Department School Performance Profile at https://www.iaschoolperformance.gov/ECP/Home/Index

Beyond the Bell is a before school, after school, and summer program as well as current 21CCLC grantee. In 2015 Loess Hills Computer Programming Elementary opened as a new school that combined two previous elementary schools with around 200 students each. With the opening of the new school and new boundary lines for the SCCSD the enrollment of Loess Hills has reached 626, K-5th grade students for the 2021-2022 school year. According to the Iowa Department of Education the Sioux City School District (SCCSD) Free and Reduced lunch percentage (FRPL) is 70.5% for 2020-2021. The FRPL at Loess Hills Elementary is currently at 55%. BTB is requesting new 21 CCLC funding, consistent with what is allowed per the RFA, “to start a program to support at-risk children and to expand to a new school/site,” at Loess Hills Elementary before school, after school, and summer beginning with the 2022-2023 school year.

West Middle School is a past grantee from Cohort 9 and is currently a BTB parent funded fee stie that has been able to sustain at a significantly smaller enrollment. While being funding by 21CCLC WMS had an average attendance of 70 students however, since the grant funding ended the average attendance is 10 students. WMS FRPL is 72.1%. BTB is requesting new 21CCLC funding, consistent with what is allowed per the RFA, “to support previously funded programs and services for before school, afterschool, and summer programs'' to continue to serve our current students at WMS and meet the needs of new students beginning with the 2022-2023 school year. Academic learning loss, financial circumstances, reliable transportation and poverty is high and creates a continuous barrier for the students and families of Loess Hills and WMS.

STUDENT NEED: Based on the student needs assessment, focus groups, parent surveys, and school principal staff interview the information and data given shows substantial need in the areas of academic achievement, transportation, cost, family engagement, and social-emotional learning which BTB programs will address through this grant.

· Academic Need: Students need other avenues to be able to succeed academically other than the confines of the school day. Along with guided help to try to lessen the gap learning loss due to the COVID 19 pandemic and related absences.

· Access: Families need a safe location and program that is accessible.

· Social-Emotional Need: Families need a program that is easily accessible, safe and reliable. Resources within the community need to be made more accessible to our families and food security needs to be a priority.

· Family Engagement: Family units of elementary school students differ slightly and need to be adapted to the needs of each family and student. Families need support academically, socially, and emotionally, culturally, and from community resources.

PROJECT: At Beyond the Bell, we believe in helping children and families reach their full potential by providing a safe place to play, creating a quality learning environment and promoting growth. BTB proposes to provide a safe and enrichment filled environment that responds to the needs of the students and families of Loess Hills Elementary and West Middle School. Programming will be provided for 2 hours before school and immediately afterschool until 6:00 P.M. every day school is in session at Loess Hills. At WMS programming will be provided immediately afterschool until 6:00 P.M. everyday school is in session. These program times include an extra hour each week for an early dismissal on Mondays for school staff in-service. During summer, BTB proposes to provide 39 days of programming. BTB works in collaboration with SCCSD to address children and family need in these areas: academics, social and emotional development, and family engagement. BTB aligns programming with school day instruction through input from district administrators, specific school goals, and regular communication with school day staff.

RESEARCH BASE: BTB is dedicated to high quality out of school programming and keeps current with curricula and research in order to design, modify, improve, and enhance programming by using the research to help plan, implement, and guide program options. Research studies around the importance of out of school time is a driving force behind what BTB implements in their day-to-day programming.

MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY: The Site Leader of Loess Hills and WMS along with Youth Enrichment Coordinators will receive guidance from the Multi Site Manager, Community, Family, and Student Liaison, and other BTB management. The advisory committee, which is composed of parents, teachers, and community partners will be charged with focusing on reviewing the local evaluation and community impact report and suggest improvements within the program. This committee will assist with development of new community partners, evaluate parent and student satisfaction, and help to seek funding for sustainability. The Advisory Committee will make recommendations to the SHIP Board of Directors for final approval.

COMMUNICATION PLAN: BTB’s communication plan is to grow connections within the SCCSD and Siouxland community to continue to engage and promote the programs offered and to open doors to new opportunities. BTB uses multiple tools to share day to day information with parents through parent communication notes, monthly newsletters, BTB website, www.beyondthebell.us.com, text services and Facebook group posts. All BTB information is translated to Spanish in office and any other translations that are needed are provided by community organization One Siouxland.



PARTNERSHIPS: BTB has multiple community partners that offer a wide range of services and enrichment for not only our students but their families. BTB has MOU’s from SCCSD, Catholic Charities Diocese of Sioux City, Siouxland Community Health Department, Siouxland Food Bank, Morningside University, and Sioux City Police Department. BTB’s goal is to expand by two partners annually throughout this grant cycle.

EVAULATION: BTB will use Consulting by Design LLC as their evaluators for the 21CCLC application. Consulting by Design has been BTB’s outside evaluator of 21CCLC programming in both Iowa and Nebraska since 2017. BTB’s goals and objectives will be measured from data given to BTB by the school district along with pre and post-tests that will be conducted by certified teachers during our summer program. Surveys will be distributed to students, staff, parents, school day staff, and teachers. This feedback is utilized in multiple ways including BTB local evaluation, community impact report, and shared with the advisory committee to help make motions and recommendations regarding BTB.

BUDGET NARRATIVE: BTB used the funding formula as follows:

$10.00 per day x 75 students x 180 days before and after school = $135,000

$10.00 per day x 30 students x 39 days summer = $11,700

$7.50 per day x 40 students x 180 days after school = $54,000

$10.00 per day x 20 students x 39 days summer =$7,800

BTB will maintain the 10 students currently enrolled at WMS through DHS childcare assistance and/or community parterships making a total of 50 students served during the school year at WMS. This will allow BTB to serve 165 students a year from 21CCLC funding with a request for $208,500.00.

Student Needs Assessments (20 possible points) 

Student Need

Overview of Siouxland Human Investment Partnership: SHIP is a non-profit organization that was established in 1998 as the Early Childhood Iowa and Decategorization (DCAT) Board for Woodbury County. In 2001, SHIP partnered with the United Way of Siouxland, the SCCSD and the Siouxland YMCA to develop the area’s first afterschool program, Beyond the Bell. Originally a program of the YMCA, BTB began offering programming at all SCCSD elementary schools. Established as a fee-based program, the partners soon discovered that many low income, at-risk families could not afford to send their students to the program. SHIP, the fiscal agent for the program, applied for and was awarded 21CCLC funding and multiple grant-funded sites began offering the program free of charge to families. In 2007, the YMCA determined that it no longer desired to be the lead agency for BTB, so SHIP took over the program. Today, BTB operates at 25 sites across two states and three school districts, serving on average over 2,800 students in PreK - 8thgrade. Currently, four sites are funded by Iowa 21CCLC grants, and five sites are funded by Nebraska 21CCLC grants. All non 21CCLC sites operate on a fee schedule, United Way and other funding sources are utilized to assist low-income families at non-grant sites.

2.1 Evidence of Student Need: Loess Hills: Loess Hills Computer Programming Elementary School is the inspiration for the State of Iowa’s Computer Science Elementary project. The SCCSD pioneered one of the first computer programming elementary schools in the nation in 2015 when they started teaching computational thinking. At Loess Hills, computer programming is weaved throughout the curriculum in a visual, intuitive, and imaginative way. BTB proposes to serve 75 students with before school and after school programming for 180 days during the school year and 30 students during the summer for 39 days. Loess Hills Elementary is currently a non 21CCLC site that operates on a parent funded fee schedule. According to the needs assessment, many families do not have reliable transportation and are not able to afford fee-based programming creating barriers. Without 21CCLC funding at this location a BTB program will continue to serve a minimal number of students that can pay for programming, current average enrollment is 20 students.

WMS BTB will serve 60 students with afterschool and summer programming. The programming at this site will be club based, and the activities or clubs will be selected by the BTB WMS student leadership group. Homework help and academic fundamentals will be offered daily by staff along with a mentoring program with Loess Hills 5th grade students. Programming at WMS will offer a safe environment for students to go afterschool to participate in club activities that are consistent with the school day. The biggest need at WMS is to have a safe environment for students to go until their parents are off work and have academic support.

Academic Need: According to Loess Hills principal, Ms. Voegeli, it has become increasingly hard to find a way to fit all the computer programming aspects of their curriculum in to the school day. Having the ability to have BTB programming would allow us to implement some of the curriculum into the afterschool program. Loess Hills vice principal, Mr. Davis, also stated that being able to provide academic tutoring and computer programming would significantly benefit the students and staff during the school day. Some of the examples of using computer programming within curriculum is: Read a book with a computer science focus and discuss how the characters are using the technology to advance the world, write a string code using basic math formulas, or build a virtual zoo to learn about animals in science class, all things that could be implemented into the after-school program with BTB. Ms.Voegili, also stated that the students at the school currently do not have access to transportation to be able to participate in afterschool activities. The parents either do not have reliable transportation or are working and unable to pick their student up at the designated time. BTB becoming a 21 CCLC site would help eliminate barriers for these circumstances by giving opportunity for students to work on their academic skills, build positive peer relationships, join student leadership, start Lego leagues, and continue computer programming into the afterschool program.

At WMS a need for a safe place to go after school so the students are not left on their own with the addition of being able to stay current with their academic goals is the largest need. With a FRPL percentage above 70% a monthly food pantry partnered with the Siouxland Food Bank along with a caring closet would benefit the students and families of WMS. Loess Hills principal and WMS staff have also stated that parent participation is essential in helping support the students. It is seen during conferences and other parent/teacher meetings, parents need support in the areas of accessing health care, mental health services, in home BHIS services, and access to healthy food. Many of these areas of need overflow into the school day causing many of the students to fall behind in their schoolwork. BTB allows the children a safe place to go before school and after school so they are not left on their own and can help stay current with their academic goals. The ELL population within the SCCSD is high and Loess Hills Elementary is 20.80% and WMS is 13.5% which means there is a significant number of students whose first language is not English. BTB will use our bilingual staff members along with the SCCSD certified ELL teachers to meet this need.


Overall Proficiency State Average Loess Hills Elementary West Middle School

Reading 69.81% 67.36% 60.91%

Math 70.16% 70.83% 60.13%

ELP 60.75% 62.86% 38.79%

Social-Emotional Need: Loess Hills Elementary students continue their middle school educational career at WMS. Both schools serve a diverse population with significant economic and academic needs with a free and reduced lunch rate of 55% and 72.1%. According to the needs assessments and staff meetings some of the most important benefits of BTB are the opportunities that students have to continue to build positive peer and adult relationships outside of school. BTB offers families a safe and caring environment for their students to try new things, get access to physical activity, and interact with others instead of potentially spending time home alone or in front of video games. Beyond the Bell will also be serving students at both sites an evening meal, to address food security, every day that school is in session.

Student Poverty: Free and Reduced-Price Lunch Eligibility for Targeted Schools

School 2021 Eligibility- % of total student population

Loess Hills Elementary 55%

West Middle School 72.1%

All SCCSD Elementary Schools 70.5%

Source: 2020-21 Iowa Public School K-12 Students Eligible for Free or Reduced-Price Lunch by District.xlsx (live.com)

Family Engagement: The needs of each school and student are diverse and BTB understands that in order to serve the family as a whole they need support academically, social/emotionally, culturally, and from community resources. According to the needs assessment the information shows that Loess Hills families need to have access to transportation home and community resources to help strengthen their family unit. BTB would help bring these community resources along with food access to Loess Hills and WMS families by hosting family nights every month from September-May. Each of these family engagement nights will provide a meal and will either spotlight a specific community resource that has been picked by the student leadership team and parent board or discuss and display projects that their child has been working on. The community resource will be conveniently housed either at Loess Hills Elementary or WMS for that evening or BTB will offer transportation for the student and family to the place of business. Examples of these resources will be: Siouxland Community Health to have child well checks, District Health to be able to answer questions regarding immunizations, a local dentist to offer dental screening, a local optometrist to offer vision screenings, Community Action Agency and/or Mary Treglia to help answer tax questions, etc. BTB will also provide an activity for the families to work on together will help parents understand the importance of adult engagement in education. Transportation, Access, Safety: Poverty is a continuous barrier for these students and families causing them to face several roadblocks in achieving success. Many of these parents experience extended work hours making it harder for them to support children’s educational success at home. BTB is conveniently located within the students’ school day building allowing for safety and convenience for parents, and consistency for the students. This also allows for constant interactions between BTB and school day staff to discuss daily needs of students in our care. All BTB sites meet all city, state, and federal guidelines and regulations related to fire, health, natural disaster, emergency responses, and general safety. BTB programs are licensed by the Iowa Department of Human Services (DHS) providing regulation on many safety measures such as sign in and out procedures, cleaning procedures and sanitization, adult to student ratios, credential minimums for staff, and overarching best practices in caring for school aged children.

2.2 Evidence of Stakeholders: To help continue planning of 21CCLC grant development, BTB met with administrators of the SCCSD, principals, and the BTB administrative team to develop which school or schools have the largest barriers of access to programs. The guidance provided by the stakeholders led to Loess Hills Elementary and WMS being the highest need schools due to their high FRLP and accessibility of a mentoring program. BTB held an individual meeting with the principal, student surveys and parent surveys. BTB was able to reflect on the data that was received and many of the ideas and activities are represented in this application.

21CCLC programming will help fill a gap that the school day does not allow time for. This program will focus on academic enrichments, social emotional development, healthy choices, and family engagement.

Project (24 possible points) 

3.1 Link to Student Need: The student needs assessments at Loess Hills Elementary and WMS showed that families are in need of academic assistance, access to transportation, social emotional resources, community assistance, and access to programming. BTB provides a safe and stimulating environment that responds to family, school and community needs along with mentoring and advocacy that engage and support the students. BTB’s programming is housed in each SCCSD day school which allows BTB to work closely with school day staff to address the needs of students. Areas of need have been identified as: academics, access to transportation, social and emotional skills, family engagement, high ELL population, and food security. To begin to meet the needs of these students and families BTB proposes the following:

  • To increase academic achievement, BTB staff will support students by providing individual and small group homework assistance. (Academic Need)

  • Iowa certified teachers assess each child individually and deliver small group skills-based instruction at no more than a 1:6 teacher to student ratio. BTB aligns this instruction with the school day curriculum using Journeys and Lexia Core 5, and small group skills-based instruction with the Iowa Core Standards for reading and vocabulary instruction and INTO Math for math instruction. All certified classroom teachers have been trained in this curriculum and are provided ongoing support in its delivery by the SCCSD. This targeted tutoring and academic support will help BTB achieve academic goals of ensuring regular attendees will achieve greater growth in reading and math as measured by performance on Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) measures survey. (Academic Need)

  • BTB will have one certified teacher who specializes in ELL to be culturally responsive and link the language throughout the curriculum and small group tutoring. (Academic Need)

  • BTB will provide transportation home, as needed, by SCCSD bussing at the end of program every day school is in session. (Access to Programming)


  • BTB staff will attend Positive Behavior Support Training (PBIS) provided by the Northwest AEA to implement during BTB program hours. (Social-Emotional Need)

  • BTB will provide the opportunity for BTB staff to complete their para-educator certificate. (Social-Emotional Need)

  • BTB will support a monthly food bank at WMS and help stock the caring closet by providing additional toiletries, clothing, and non-perishable food to students in need. (Community Assistance Need and Access Need)

  • BTB will host a food bank at Loess Hills Elementary September-May. (Access Need)

  • BTB will host family engagement nights monthly to provide academic enrichment activities and access to community resources. (Family Need)

3.2 Academic, enrichment, family engagement, and snack. BTB offers before school programming, Monday-Friday beginning at 6:30 A.M. until the start of school at Loess Hills Elementary. The afterschool program is offered Monday-Friday from the end of school until 6:00 P.M at both Loess Hills and WMS. Program starts early on every Monday for school day staff development, and program is located in the respective school buildings.

Before and after school programs rotate through a variety of high-quality enrichment activities, centers, and clubs that are guided by student voice and choice allowing the Site Leader to develop the lesson plans. These centers or clubs are focused on homework help, math, literacy, STEM, gross motor, fine motor and much more. Activities may range from yoga and mindfulness to a book club and creating their own garden. Students will attend field trips to the library, local nursing homes, museum, local colleges and Universities, and many other community businesses. As much as possible, BTB will align learning activities and field trips with what students are learning during the school day. BTB has shown how to begin to meet the needs of these student and families through a chart that proposes how BTB will meet the needs through eligible federal activities. The chart is attached at the end of the application.

* Please see attachment of Student Needs to Eligible Federal Activity*

3.3 Family Engagement. Family engagement nights will consist of community partners and resources that BTB can help make accessible to families. Loess Hills Elementary and WMS will provide a family event every month September through May. These events will consist of educating parents on resources provided by Siouxland Community Health Center, Siouxland District Health Department, filing tax forms, DHS assistance, and WITCC for adult education classes.

A parent advisory board will be developed for the BTB each location, and meetings will be held monthly. One representative from each location will be asked to sit on the overarching BTB advisory committee that meets quarterly. This parent advisory will help BTB staff understand the needs of the students involved in programming along with continued support and connection to the families.

3.4 Goals and objectives. Mentoring and advocacy by BTB staff will be emphasized to engage and support children with high academic and/or economic needs. BTB works closely with the SCCSD to address student needs in three areas: academic assistance, enrichment services, and family engagement. Evaluation goals and objectives will include:

Goal 1: Provide high quality activities to help students meet and/or succeed proficiency goals in reading and math with additional support for ELL students.

· BTB will meet or exceed all IDOE and GPRA measures required by the RFA.

· At least 50% of students at each site participate in the annual Service-Learning Challenge.

· 80% attendance rate will be achieved for all regular attendees.

· BTB will operate 39 days during summer.

Measure of Effectiveness: BTB will provide tutoring, including ELL tutoring, at each location through SCCSD certified teachers. Students will be assessed during school year and summer program. Data will be compiled for 21CCLC reporting requirements.

Goal 2: Increase student, parent, and school staff communication to improve student success.

· At least 50% of students will demonstrate increased school engagement and positive behavior as evidenced by the student and teacher survey.

· At least one school staff member participates in the BTB Advisory Committee.

· In annual surveys, at least 50% of BTB parents report being satisfied with the level of communication they receive from BTB.

Measure of Effectiveness: Surveys will be distributed to students, teachers, parents, and community partners throughout the year.

Goal 3: Provide opportunities for parents and families to be a part of the parent advisory board. Provide community resources that will support family academic success and access to resources.

· A majority of regular BTB families will participate in Family Literacy events.

· At least one BTB parent participates in the BTB Advisory Committee.

· 80% of parents will indicate via a survey that the program has had a positive impact on their ability to help support their child’s educational and social achievement.

Measure of Effectiveness: BTB will assess opportunities through surveys and attendance of family nights.

3.5 Align with the school day. BTB is in the student’s school day building which allows for the program to be an extension of the SCCSD by using the same academic programs, standards, curriculum, discipline, and vision. Being in the same location also results in constant communication with school day teachers and staff. Certified classroom teachers will tutor BTB students using the same skill-based instruction and curriculum that is used during the school day. Site Leaders, Multi Site Managers, and the Community, Family, and Student Liaison will meet monthly with each school principal to let them know what has happened in the program during the month and what they can expect for the upcoming month. School day staff will help BTB recruit and communicate with parents of students who need to be in the program based on academic or economic need. The Site Leader and Community, Family, and Student Liaison will help connect school day and afterschool by being not only a key component in the implementation of programming but also by planning and providing professional development regarding programming. BTB will participate in Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS) consistent with each school and will attend SCCSD professional development for the intervention.

Alignment with School Improvement Plans. The SCCSD goal areas are the following: provide relevant, rigorous, and innovative academics, provide safe, healthy and supportive learning environments; attract and support highly effective teachers, leaders and staff; practice effective, efficient and sustainable business practices; and strengthen school, family and community engagement. The mission of BTB aligns with this strategic plan. BTB fulfills Focus 2022 goal areas by providing before and after school academic enrichment, ensuring a safe, healthy learning environment, partnering with SCCSD certified teachers, and providing a robust communication plan for successful engagement with students, parents, school, and community partners.


3.6 Experience. BTB has over 20 years of experience in providing out of school time programming that positively impacts academic performance, school day attendance, and social and emotional development. BTB has grown to operate 25 sites across two states and three school districts, serving on average over 2,000 students in PreK-8th grade. Currently, four sites are funded by Iowa 21CCLC grants, and five sites are funded by Nebraska 21CCLC grants.

BTB has demonstrated through years of successful programming the ability to manage 21CCLC grant funding and have completed all necessary evaluations, assessments, financial and administrative requirements. BTB maintains numerous longstanding formal partnerships to support programming as documented by MOU’s. In addition, BTB maintains an advisory group of partners and parents who advise the program on priorities, goals, and quality assurance. Feedback from students, parents, BTB staff, community partners, and school day staff consistently endorses:

· According to BTB surveys, BTB fulfills a critical unmet school and community need in Siouxland by providing before and after school programming with most respondents indicating the program is “extremely important” or “important”.

· BTB is trusted for its safe, respectful, and child-centered before and after school program.

· BTB adapted and continued to provide engagement and support to families during the COVID-19 pandemic resulting in over 100 families being delivered age-appropriate learning enrichment kits.

Research Base (5 possible points)  

Research Base: BTB is dedicated to high quality out of school programming and keeps current with curricula and research in order to design, modify, improve, and enhance programming by using the research to help plan, implement, and guide program options. Research studies around the importance of out of school time is a driving force behind what BTB implements in their day-to-day programming. Academic Need: BTB focuses on academic performance and decreasing learning loss. Research shows that high-quality afterschool programs improve students’ educational outcomes, school attendance, and social and emotional learning. Research shows that consistent participation in afterschool programs has shown lower dropout rates and has helped close achievement gaps for low-income students.

(Source: NCSL National Conference of State Legislatures https://www.ncsl.org/research/education/expanding-learning-opportunities-through-afterschool-programs.aspx ). Early intervention is critical: Students struggling in reading as 8th graders only have a 10% chance of catching up (Source: ACT research on early reading:http://www.act.org/content/dam/act/unsecured/documents/ImportanceofEarlyLearning.pdf) BTB students are assessed on fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary as well as math concepts. BTB tries to match the SCCSD’s curriculum plans throughout our school year tutoring and summer program. The SCCSD has switched to Small Group Skills Based Instruction format during the school year that BTB implements as well. Students are put in small groups with other students who have similar skill sets the BTB teachers then differentiates their instruction to meet the needs of these students through skills-based instruction in the areas that each group needs to focus on. Research has shown that by teaching the specific skills needed to each different group of students, fluency will increase as well as their comprehension. Social-Emotional Need: According to, https://www.strongnation.org/articles/930-from-risk-to-opportunity-afterschool-programs-keep-kids-safe, analyzed school-day crime rates for youth in 46 states. We found that the majority of states for which we had data, had a spike in crime during the after-school hours from 2 to 6 p.m. The Sioux City Police Department (SCPD) over the last few years has become a very valuable partner with BTB. They have been able to see the importance of afterschool programming and the effect it has on their job. In Sioux City, the Police Department reported a 37% reduction in youth crime (Marie Davis, Crime Analysis Unit, Sioux City Police Department).BTB also uses the same PBIS as the SCCSD uses during the school day. According to the National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention “Schools that have implemented PBIS are experiencing reductions in disciplinary incidents and increases in instructional time. Students also learn skills for managing their own behavior and self-monitoring. Because PBIS is a framework for implementing various levels of prevention, it can act as scaffolding that supports all other school-based initiatives.” (http://www.promoteprevent.org/sites/www.promoteprevent.org/files/resources/PBIS_guide_0.pdf) Family Engagement and Access Need: A large part of the achievement gap between advantaged and disadvantaged students may be due to greater vocabulary and content learning by students in advantaged home environments. A study found that kindergarteners’ general knowledge of the world was a better predictor of those students’ fifth-grade reading ability than were early reading skills. (College and Career Readiness: The Importance of Early Learning (act.org).Not only is there a need for a safe and structured environment for school age children due to parents being in work force, but it also gives them positive role models.

Management and Sustainability Plan (20 points) 

5.1 Staffing, Professional Development, Leadership, and Volunteers Staffing and Retention: BTB recruits, hires, trains, and works to retain effective and highly qualified staff who believe in BTB’s mission: helping children and families reach their full potential by providing a safe place to play, creating a quality learning environment and promoting growth. BTB looks for staff that will treat all students and families with respect, advocate for them, and be a positive role model. The Multi-Site Manager, who is directly overseen by the Program Director, along with the Employee Development Specialist prepare a staffing plan for each site to identify the number of staff that will be needed to maintain DHS appropriate staff-student ratios. BTB uses existing job descriptions and standard SHIP hiring procedures to secure highly qualified applicants for all positions.

The Multi-Site Manager, Site Leader, and Community, Family and Student Liaison will meet at least once a month with each site’s administrative team, including the building principal, to ensure the program and the school are collaboratively providing academic and social-emotional experiences that are consistent and complimentary. Beyond the Bell will strive to ensure that what students are learning in class during the day are being mirrored through activities and experiences at program. One example: BTB utilizes the SCCSD’s PBIS curriculum, so that students and parents know the expectations around behavior, reward and consequences. BTB will also encourage positive communication between program staff and classroom teachers through a form that will be given to the principal and distributed to teachers on a weekly basis – this will ensure that any student having issues during class can work on these issues with staff at program.


Multi-Site Manager

· Ensure adequate staffing to meet all DHS required staff-to-student ratios, oversee youth workers, create and implement lesson plans, purchase supplies, oversee site budget, help monitor student progress.

· Lead regular staff meetings, asses and review site staff, and schedule staff development.

· Record daily attendance and activities at site

· Regularly communicate with school day staff

· Constant communication with families regarding their students

· Provide support for all activities at site and participate in any needed committees and conferences

· Recruit, train, engage, and supervise site volunteers

Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree preferred in education, early childhood, or discipline related to BTB programming; ability to work within established budgets, meet deadlines, and communicate effectively; experience working with school aged children; pass background check and all DHS licensing requirements, bilingual skills preferred.

Site Leader

· Work in the staff-to-student ratio to engage, support, and mentor students

· Help lead regular site staff meetings

· Communicate effectively with student and parents

· Meet with school administrative staff monthly

· Lead family engagement nights

Qualifications: Pass all the DHS licensing requirements including background check and fingerprint results. Experience working with school age children including babysitting, mentoring, volunteering or other job history. Youth Workers need patience, persistence, and the ability to find and build on the students’ strengths. BTB recruit’s youth workers at four local colleges and the SCCSD by using recommendations from professors, counselors, administrators, and student organizations.

Youth Enrichment Coordinator

· Supervise students at no more than a 1:15 staff/student ratio.

· Assist the onsite coordinator with planning site activities and help to implement

· Communicate effectively with student and parents

Qualifications: Pass all the DHS licensing requirements including background check and fingerprint results. Experience working with school age children including babysitting, mentoring, volunteering or other job history. Youth Workers need patience, persistence, and the ability to find and build on the students’ strengths. BTB recruit’s youth workers at four local colleges and the SCCSD by using recommendations from professors, counselors, administrators, and student organizations.

Iowa-certified teachers

· Tutor students for three to four hours per week at no more than a 1:6 teacher/student ratio

· Confer with school day staff regarding student need, and report on students’ academic progress. Qualifications: Iowa teaching certificate and teaching experience; prefer experience at the site where they will work.

Volunteers.

· Current high school silver cord students who are required to meet volunteer hours

· Local colleges for students who need to complete practicum requirements.

Qualifications: Must pass a criminal background check

Interns

· Morningside University partners with BTB for students in need of internships in the education, non-profit, and/or childcare career path.

Qualifications: Must pass a criminal background check.

BTB also recruits parents and qualified senior volunteers, including grandparents, retired teachers, and others from retirement organizations. Qualifications: Pass a criminal background check; be interested in and have experience working with school age children.

Training/retention. BTB holds orientation for new staff and volunteers during the beginning of the school year and summer program. Staff complete mandatory trainings such as CPR/First Aid, mandatory reporting, universal precautions, child development, and other training pertinent to their jobs. BTB staff are required to complete 6 to 10 hours of continuing education. As quality control, BTB administrators assess staff and volunteers’ work regularly, based on input from school and BTB staff, volunteers, parents, students, and survey results, to determine areas for future development. Full time staff attend local, state, and national conferences and are a part of 21CCLC committees and attend best practice webinars. The full-time staff are then able to share information that they have acquired at these trainings to their staff. SCCSD in service trainings also supplement BTB professional development. BTB retains effective staff by tending to their individual needs and concerns, seeking their input in planning, and generally promoting their investment in and ownership of the site programs. BTB staff also have the opportunity to earn their paraeducator certificate through BTB. BTB continually assesses wages and benefits in the community to ensure that staff wages and benefits match or exceed other employment opportunities.

Leadership. BTB’s senior staff includes the Program Director who coordinates all aspects of BTB, Director of Finance and Compliance who oversees budgets and compliance with the district, state and federal regulations, and Multi-Site Managers. Senior staff report to and confer quarterly with the BTB Advisory Committee.

5.2 Student transportation, safety, and inclusion. BTB sites are in public school buildings that meet code for school programming and are within Special Education and ADA Compliance. This assures that the programs take place in a safe facility that is easily accessible to students and their families, including those with disabilities. BTB uses SCCSD busses to transport students on field trips and bus routes home when and if they are needed. BTB staffs each bus route to ensure essential supervision and a parent/guardian is home before child leaves our care. Each student must be signed in and out of BTB by a parent or guardian. BTB requires the parent to list adults who are designated to pick up their child from BTB programming. Designated adults who come to pick up a student at BTB must have a form of identification and must be listed on their registrations form. BTB assists families in making these arrangements and communicates their policies to parents during the registration of their student. At sites where a significant number of students and their families speak languages other than English, at least one BTB staff member is bilingual. Although BTB targets students with academic deficiencies, all BTB programs are free from discrimination, and all have equal opportunity. BTB consults with the Northwest Area 


Education Agency and the Special Education Department of SCCSD to ensure best practice for the student. Understanding school day accommodation strategies that special education teachers, paraprofessionals, or aides use ensure consistency and creates a comfortable environment for students with disabilities. BTB also recognizes that parents are typically the most important resource, and they can help to prepare staff properly for most effective accommodations for the student.

5.3 Sustainability of leadership structure and stakeholder advisory group engagement. BTB programs are led and organized by the BTB administrative team. Philosophies and practices are in place at BTB to create a culture that upholds the overarching mission, vision, and values which is inviting and appealing to employees. The belief is that in order to effectively and positively take care of the students and families within the program, BTB must take care of the employees who are gifted with this responsibility. Professional development, annual reviews, and growth opportunities are utilized to promote personal growth and organizational expansion.

BTB will have site-based leadership teams that meet monthly to discuss site specific information regarding programming, staffing, curriculum, and communication. This team consists of the Multi-Site Manager, Site Leader, Community, Family, and Student Liaison, school principal, and school day staff. Each site will also have a site based advisory team consisting of parents, partners, Multi-Site Manager, and Site Leader that meets monthly to discuss student and family needs at each site. The information from each of these meetings will be presented to both the SHIP Board by BTB’s Program Director, and to BTB’s Advisory Committee quarterly.

5.4 Sustainability plan, continuous program improvement. Based on the need’s assessment, it was determined that with the economic hardships the families of the students at these locations face, that the vast majority of households could not access a program that is maintained by parent fees. BTB has been able to establish, maintain and sustain community partnerships over the years to be able to provide services and in-kind resources to the BTB program. As stated previously the FRLP and economic instability has increased since the pandemic creating an even stronger need for BTB to continue to serve and meet the needs of this student population. BTB is requesting new 21CCLC funding for WMS consistent with what is allowed per the RFA, “to support previously funded programs and services for before school, afterschool, and summer programs” to continue to serve our current students and meet the needs of new students.

To ensure sustainability several efforts occur. BTB will expand current partnerships, at a minimum of two per year, to increase in-kind services and goods. BTB will also continue to use their fundraising to raise awareness publicly regarding the BTB program. BTB will also use the parent and advisory committees to help think of new ideas to support sustainability.

Continuous Improvement Plan. BTB will develop a Loess Hills Elementary and West Middle School Continuous Improvement Plan (CIP) to drive results and success. A CIP workgroup will be implemented with key stakeholders including but not limited to: Principal, Multi-Site Manager, Program Director, community partners, and parents. The CIP workgroup will be charged with reviewing survey results, prioritizing quality improvement opportunities, and possible program enhancements. The results of the workgroup will be shared with the BTB advisory committee quarterly for recommendations on new goals, improvements, and enhancements to implement. This effort will further support BTB in its sustainability planning efforts for when 21CCLC funding ends.

5.4 B Previously funded grant. BTB is a before school, after school, and summer program along with a past and current 21CCLC grantee. WMS was a 21CCLC grantee in cohort 9 from 2014-2018. BTB achieved and maintained all attendance and academic goals during their time as a grantee and continues to offer enrichment activities and academic tutoring.

When WMS was a 21CCLC grantee their average attendance was 70 students. Program currently exists, but a much- reduced capacity with an average daily attendance of 10 students. WMS is able to sustain programming at a reduced capacity due to the partnerships and relationships made through years of programming. The SCCSD allows us to use their school locations that is all in-kind to our program. Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts have found other avenues of funding to help scholarship their registration fee for BTB students. To be able to continue the much-needed program at WMS, a need to supplement the current program to reach a larger number of students and families, a 21CCLC grant is needed. Due to WMS being one of the most impoverished schools in the district with a very high FRLP, and the increase of cost of living, this program will not be able to continue at any larger capacity without federal funding. SHIP and BTB are continually working on formulating development plans for BTB sites that needs assistance in funding. This includes seeking alternate sources of funding from foundations, local businesses, fundraising, and DHS Child Care assistance, to ensure that families that cannot pay for the program have other funding streams to tap into so that they are able to access program.

* Previous grantee documentation of 5-year history with sustainability included in Form G Sustainability Plan and Previous Sustainability Form.

Communication Plan (5 possible points)

Partnerships (10 possible points) 

7. Partnerships

7.1 Partnerships and impactful role in programming and sustainability. BTB has established partnerships that have served to strengthen and support their endeavors by improving program quality and building stronger relationships with staff, teachers and principals. Partnerships are imperative to make the program successful for students, families and the community. Strong relationships with partners build a more positive relationship with the school, engages staff, and fosters high quality, engaging and fun activities.

Key partners, as indicated by attached MOU’s

Community Partner and Role/Area of Significant Impact

Sioux City Community School District (SCCSD)

For over 20 years, Sioux City Community School district provides in-kind space and other essential services for BTB programming including: classrooms, playground, gym, library, common areas, heating and air conditioning of the buildings. They also provide food service for snacks and lunch, and referrals for children and families. Additionally, an administrator of SCCSD is part of the Advisory Committee. The in-kind value of services provided by the SCCSD is $160,000

Siouxland Community Health Department

Siouxland Community Health Department will provide information for BTB families. The in-kind value of services provided is $500.00 per year


Catholic Charities Diocese of Sioux City

Catholic Charities will provide access to parenting classes, mental health programs, and community resources. The in-kind value of services provided is $1000.00 per year

Sioux City Police Department

Sioux City Police Department will provide a police officer 1x per month at each site location. The in-kind value of services provided is $1000.00 per year

Siouxland Food Bank

Siouxland Food Bank will partner with BTB to host a Food Bank at Loess Hills Elementary 1x per month September-May. The in-kind value of services provided is $900.00 per year

Morningside University

Morningside University partners with BTB by sending college students to BTB for employment, volunteer opportunities, and internships. The in-kind value of services provided is $8064.00 per year

7.2Meaningful and Engaging Partnerships. The BTB partnership plan focuses on the philosophy and approach that collaborative relationships expand and enhance how we can meet the needs of students and families. Meaningful and engaging partnerships will be developed and sustained through the following strategies:

· Consistent formal and informal communication. This strategy is focused on informal communication on an ongoing basis and formal monthly communication to check in on progress, needs, and highlights. Communication via phone, zoom, email, and social media support ongoing and consistent engagement with partners. This also includes a monthly schedule of meetings. BTB will ensure active engagement in community groups and boards that further the BTB mission.

· Securing feedback. Partner feedback is critical for success and is gathered from partners throughout the year. Examples include collaboration meetings with the SCCSD, survey administered with the teachers, parents, and partners that solicits feedback on the benefit, impact, and opportunities for program enhancement.

· Sharing data. Recommendations related to student enrichment interest areas and academic achievement from the ‘Student Leadership Group’ will be shared with parents, partners, school district, and BTB staff. For example, BTB service-learning activities will be planned and implemented based on the feedback of students and developed collaboratively with partners.

· Recognition and publicity. Ongoing publicity, through news releases, BTB website, social media, and newsletters will highlight activities, progress, and partner opportunities.

· Alignment with mission and sustainability. To support success, current and future partnerships will be reviewed and affirmed for mission alignment with the goal of 21CCLC priorities, BTB mission, partnership mission, and overall sustainability.

Development & Sustainability of Partnerships. BTB Program Director, along with the Multi-Site Manager of Loess Hills Elementary, Community, Family, and Student Liaison, Executive Director of SHIP, and BTB staff will be responsible for developing and expanding partnerships for all sites, implementing policies and procedures, and implementing approaches so all cohorts embrace an efficient shared partnership and sustainability model. New partners will be recruited through resource fairs, current volunteers, coalition participation, involvement in community workgroups, and the program. Existing partner relationships will be retained through effective communication, appropriate recognition strategies, activity/service rotation, and continual evaluation of programming efforts.

Beyond the Bell is a program of SHIP, which means it is governed by the SHIP Board of Directors. The Beyond the Bell program-wide Advisory Council will meet monthly and make motions/recommendations to the SHIP Board regarding Beyond the Bell programming, funding and future direction. The program-wide Advisory Council has administrative-level representation from all three school districts BTB serves, program partners, SHIP Board members and Beyond the Bell staff.

For the purposes of this grant, the Multi-Site Manager and Community, Family, and Student Liaison will meet monthly with each site’s administrative team (Principal and any staff they desire to include) as well as program partners to ensure that the program is moving in a positive direction and staying on track with the goals set forth in this application.
SHIP’s Executive Director and BTB staff attend professional development opportunities as they arise and will continue to serve on community boards and attend meetings to ensure constant connections to current or potential future partners. Meetings such as Growing Community Connections, Source for Siouxland, Healthy Siouxland Initiative, Brighter Futures, SACERS, NWEA Paraeducator classes, IMPACT conference and SCCSD PBIS professional development are examples of commitments that Multi-Site Manager will attend.

Beyond the Bell will start this project with 6 partners, as evidenced by the MOUs included in this application. Beyond the Bell does have partnerships with WITCC to offer HiSet classes to parents who are interested and other entities like the Launchpad Children’s Museum where they provide discounted entry for BTB field trips and host a family night at their facility. Staff will maintain these partnerships and will add a minimum of 2 new partners each year. New partner connections will be made while out in the community, but student, family and school input will also be sought to find new partners.

Evaluation (10 possible points) 

8.1 Experienced Evaluator. BTB in partnership with its external evaluator, Consulting By Design LLC, shall collect and analyze data to measure the effectiveness of program goals, activities, and partnerships. This firm has provided evaluation and consulting services supporting community-based organizations with evaluation, non-profit development, and quality assurance since 2001. In its nineteen-year history, Consulting By Design LLC has served as the external and local evaluator on an array of federal funded projects in Minnesota, Nebraska, and Iowa to include Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Administration for Children and Families, Department of Labor, and Department of Education 21CCLC.

As the external evaluator since 2017, Consulting By Design LLC has demonstrated capacity to provide requested data and information to the Iowa Department of Education and is committed to attend local evaluator training hosted by 21CCLC. In addition, the firm maintains commitment to utilizing all evaluation tools and forms provided by the Iowa Department of Education. Contact information for the local evaluator is: Consulting By Design LLC, P.O. Box 2698, Sioux City, IA 51106; Email: consultingbydesign@yahoo.com; heidi_kammerhodge@yahoo.com.



Examples from previous local evaluations that demonstrate success. Feedback from students, parents, BTB staff, community partners, and school staff consistently endorses quality and effectiveness of BTB, with the following evaluation themes over the past three years:

  1. BTB fulfills a critical unmet school and community need in Siouxland by providing before and after- school programming with the vast majority of respondents indicating the program is “extremely important” or “important”.

  2. The satisfaction and quality rating for BTB is very high, with over 88% of cumulative feedback from students, parents, BTB staff, and the community being affirming of the program.

  3. BTB has focused on solidifying partnerships that strategically align with the mission of BTB and are sustainable. The partnership and communication between SCCSD and BTB is instrumental to the program’s success. Feedback from the SCCSD indicates a high level of value and satisfaction in the services provided by BTB to the students and community.

8.2 Evaluation Results Evaluation findings are key for program enhancement and quality assurance. The evaluation services shall ensure: review of student achievement data (academic, attendance, behavioral), meaningful analysis of teacher, staff, parent and youth surveys, and determination of progress toward program goals and objectives in a comprehensive, rigorous evaluation of effectiveness. The following outlines program goals, objectives, and activities.

Goals.

1. Provide high quality activities to help student meet and/or succeed proficiency goals in reading and math with additional support for ELL students. BTB will operate 39 days during summer program.

2. Increase student, parent, and school staff communication to improve student success.

3. Provide opportunities for parents and families to be a part of the parent advisory board. Provide community resources that will support family academic success and improve access to resources.

Objectives. Evaluation objectives will include:

· BTB will meet or exceed all IDOE and GPRA measures required by the RFA.

· BTB will provide ELL tutoring at each cohort

· At least one school staff member participates in the BTB Advisory Committee.

· At least 50% of students will demonstrate increased school engagement and positive behaviors as evidenced by the student and teacher survey.

All program activities will be examined, and recommendations will be made for continuous program improvement by the BTB Advisory Committee. The evaluation will examine how the program impacted students, families, and key stakeholders. Program staff receive the reports during their weekly multi-site meetings allowing for discussion and use of the information in program improvement. Program staff from each site inform stakeholders with the results through formal and informal communication including site newsletters and brochures, personal contact with families, school staff and administrators and future program updates initiated from the reports. This data is also shared with SHIP.

The following detailed timelines demonstrate how Beyond the Bell ensures data is made public and utilized for quality improvement. BTB disseminates local evaluation information systematically through posting evaluation reports on the BTB website (http://www.beyondthebell.us.com) by December 31 of each year.

Evaluation Strategy Purpose Method Timeline

Parent, teacher, student survey To collect quality feedback Written and Electronic Survey March-April

Partner/Stakeholder survey To collect feedback from the community Written and Electronic May

Local Evaluation To gather GPRA related data Annual Data request to SCCSD November

State Survey To provide 21CCLC specific data Information from BTB records December

APR To collect aggregate or general data APR data cohort specific data December

Community Impact Report To provide overall summary of programming Written narrative posted February

 

8.3 Measure of Effectiveness for previous grantees (ESSA). BTB meets the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) measures of effectiveness and is dedicated to consistently providing data about program success with attendance, behavior, literacy, and math through the annual performance report (APR), state survey, and local evaluation. Beyond the Bell is an experienced grantee with over 20 years of experience. Beyond the Bell has consistently met local evaluation objectives over the past years.

Examples from previous local evaluations that demonstrate success. Feedback from students, parents, BTB staff, community partners, and school staff consistently endorses quality and effectiveness of BTB, with the following:

Achievement of Local Evaluation Objectives.

· Increased Proficiency. Due to implications and modifications needed to for collection of data due to COVID-19, total attendance was utilized to assess grade level progress for each of the 2020-2021 21CCLC cohorts. A comparison of grade level at the fall of 2020 to fall of 2021 was utilized to infer and measure improvement and proficiency in GPRA measures. Success: Proficiency data for regular (at least 30 days) program attendees was provided and 166 out of 166 students progressed to the next grade level.

· Satisfaction with Services. In annual surveys, at least 50% of BTB parents report being satisfied or very satisfied with the level of communication they receive from BTB. Success. Over 90% of cumulative feedback from parents indicates satisfaction with communication from BTB.

· Community Involvement/ Field Trips. At least 90% of regular (at least 30 days) program participants attend at least one field trip to a community partner site. Success: 96% of all regular attendees attended at least one field trip.

Budget Narrative (10 possible points) 

Budget Narrative: BTB requests support for high-quality dedicated staff to support services to 75 elementary students at Loess Hills Elementary for 180 days during the school year and 30 students for 39 days in the summer. The elementary budget is $146,700.00. The WMS program will serve a total of 50 students’ afterschool during the school year, 40 students with 21CCLC funding and 10 students with DHS assistance and community partnerships, for 180 days and 20 students for 39 days during the summer. The total middle school budget is $75,300.00 - $13,500 (DHS and Partnerships) making the total request for 21CCLC funding for middle school $61,800.00. Each budget has been calculated separately but shown below as a total of $208,500.00. BTB used the funding formula as shown:

$10.00 per day x 75 students for 180 days before and after school= $135,000.00

$10.00 per day x 30 students for 39 days = $11,700.00 (summer Loess Hills)

$7.50 per day x 50 students for 180 days after school =$67,500.00

-$7.50 x 10 students for 180 days after school = $13,500 (DHS and partnerships)

$10.00 per day x 20 students for 39 days = $7,800.00 (summer WMS)

Total 21CCLC funding request: $208,500.00. Program: Personnel:Loess Hills Elementary will have a Multi-Site Manager who oversees 21CCLC grant site locations. This position has administrative duties such as entering attendance for activities, lesson planning, attending partner meetings, meeting with principals and school day staff, and planning family engagement nights. Site Leaders supervise daily at each site and part of the 1:15 staff-student ratio. The Site Leader helps with lesson planning, the student leadership committee, monthly newsletters, etc. Youth Enrichment Specialists are the front-line staff who supervise the students at no more than a 1:15 staff-student ratio, engage in enrichment activities, and communicate with parents. Certified teachers will tutor at no more than a 1:6 teacher-student ratio for 3 days per week. The Community, Family and Student Liaison will serve BTB families at all 21CCLC grant locations to help close the gap between school day and afterschool. This position will help plan family engagement evenings and be the contact for families who need assistance either academically, economically or culturally.

  • Loess Hills Elementary Multi-Site Manager @$19.50/hr + benefits for 4 hours/day for 225 day (.50 FTE)

  • Community, Family and Student Liaison @ $19.50/hr + benefits for 3 hours/day for 225 days (.45 FTE)

  • Certified Teacher @$30/hr for 128 hours during school year

  • Certified Teacher @$30.00/hr for 122 hours during summer

  • Site Leader @ $13.50/hr before school for 2 hours/day for 180 days

  • Site Leader @ $13.50/hr afterschool on Mondays for 3.5 hours for 36 days

  • Site Leader @ $13.50/hr afterschool Tuesday-Friday for 2.5 hours for 144 days

  • Youth Enrichment Specialist @ $11.50/hr before school for 2 hours/day for 180 days

  • Youth Enrichment Specialist @$11.50/hr for afterschool on Mondays for 3.5 hours for 36 days

  • Youth Enrichment Specialist @$11.50/hr for afterschool Tuesday –Friday for 2.5 hours/day 144 days

  • Youth Enrichment Specialists @$11.50/hr for summer program for 7 hours/day for 39 days. All salaries and benefits are standard for BTB. Fulltime positions receive 7.65% FICA, 9.44% IPERS, insurance (0.03% professional, 0.05% unemployment, and health/dental at $4,955.00 per year) and 1.38% workers’ compensation (WC). Teachers receive FICA, IPERS, and WC. Youth workers receive FICA and WC. SHIP charges a 5% employer of record fee on salaries and benefits to cover those costs. Total: $154,810.00 Volunteers and interns will contribute a total of 640 hours throughout school year, family engagement events and summer program @ the approximate cost of $10.50/hour. Total of contributed services for personnel: $8,064.00

Contracted Services: BTB has contracted services with multiple Siouxland Community Businesses like Launchpad Children’s Museum that give a discounted rate of admission, ISU extension where they give BTB a discounted rate on registration fees that we do not want to pass on to our families. The Food Bank of Siouxland is a contracted service to provide monthly food banks for our families of BTB. Total: $6,950.00

Many businesses and community partners that work with BTB give a certain % of their services to us at no cost. The total partner contributed service for contracted services is $5,900.00.

Materials and Supplies: BTB materials and supplies support enrichment activities, family engagement nights, and summer programming. The supplies and materials will include enrichment supplies for center-based learning, academic supplies for small group tutoring, supplies for student lead clubs, materials to restock caring closets, meals for family engagement nights and other materials. Total: $10,585.00

Local businesses donate supplies to the BTB program throughout the year like arts and crafts supplies, reusable bags for food bank, puzzles, games, etc. The total partner contribution is a total of $3,000.00

The program portion of the requested budget is 83.5%.

Afterschool snack and meals: The SCCSD Central Kitchen in kinds afterschool snack, evening meals, summer breakfast and lunch to the BTB program. The total partner contribution for this is a total of $ 39,210.00.

Professional Development: At BTB we believe in the investment of staff with high quality staff development in all areas of children and families. The Multi-Site manager will be required to spend 5 hours weekly dedicated to training of staff, researching new PD, staff orientations, managing staff PD files, and working on development materials. All staff are required to complete mandatory hours of DHS trainings annually. BTB staff also have the opportunity to pursue their paraeducator certificate through BTB. 21CCLC staff will also attend the annual IMPACT afterschool conference and committee meetings. BTB uses Professional Development to train and retain high-quality staff. This will support BTB staff attending SCCSD PBIS trainings, paraeducator classes, Bilingual language classes, speakers, development materials and attending the IMPACT afterschool conference. The professional development portion of the requested budget is 5%. Total Staff Development Budget: $ 10,425.00 BTB has a nurse consultant who volunteers her time for 1st Aid and CPR classes for staff. The total partner contribution for this is $1,500.00.

Student Access and facility safety: BTB has found that reliable transportation is vital to effective programming and child safety. The SCCSD charges BTB for the driver’s salary and hours driven. BTB requests transportation home during the school year every day school is in session from Loess Hills Elementary and multiple family engagement nights and summer transportation. BTB accommodates student and family language-interpretation needs by employing bilingual staff and collaborating when other translation services are needed. The student access and portion of the requested budget is 3%. Total: $7,900.00.The SCCSD provides in-kind space and other essential services for BTB programming including space in the buildings, and janitorial services. The total partner contribution for this is a total of $160,000.00. Evaluation: Evaluation is a key component and enables BTB to improve and sustain. BTB’s experienced independent evaluator has worked with BTB since 2017 and will provide 35-40 hours of work at $28/hour. The evaluation portion of the requested budget is .5%. Total: $1,150.00 Administration: SHIP acts as employer of record for BTB and provides payroll functions, grant and fiscal managment, and fiscal reporting. All are vital to a successful program and SHIP provides them for 8% of the requested budget. Total:$16,680. BTB provides data grant support for a total of $1406.00. With this request for 21CCLC funding, BTB will supplement, not supplant, current funding.

 

Supplemental Materials

Before School (BS) Site Operations

Estimated Start Date:

August 23, 2022

Estimated End Date:

May 31, 2023

Total Number of Service Days:

180

Total hours of Before School services per typical week:

10

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

6:30 am

6:30 am

6:30 am

6:30 am

6:30 am

8:30 am

8:30 am

8:30 am

8:30 am

8:30 am

2

2

2

2

2

Saturday

n/a

n/a

n/a

After School (AS) Site Operations

Total hours of After School services per typical week:

13.5

Total Number of Service Days:

180

Estimated End Date:

May 31, 2023

Estimated Start Date:

August 23, 2022

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

2:30 pm

3:30 pm

3:30 pm

3:30 pm

3:30 pm

6:00 pm

6:00 pm

6:00 pm

6:00 pm

6:00 pm

3.5

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.5

Saturday

n/a

n/a

n/a

Summer (SUM) Site Operations

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

7:00 am

7:00 am

7:00am

7:00 am

7:00 am

5:30 pm

5:30 pm

5:30 pm

5:30 pm

5:30 pm

10.5

10.5

10.5

10.5

10.5

Saturday

n/a

n/a

n/a

Estimated Start Date:

June 6, 2022

Estimated End Date:

July 29, 2022

Total Number of Service Days:

39

Total hours of Summer services per typical week:

52.50

Adult Family Member Services

All 21CCLC programs are required to host a minimum of four family-centered events each year. A general rule of thumb is one per quarter. Examples of events include back-to-school celebrations, literacy nights, family game nights, recreational events, guest speakers, and so on. 

Describe Frequency, Duration, and Dosage:

BTB will host monthly family engagement events during the school year for an average of 1-2 hours. Family engagement nights will consist of community partners and resources that BTB can help make accessible to families. These events will consist of students presenting projects they are working on at BTB, parent education regarding community resources, and a meal.

Estimated Total Number of Adult Family Members Served:*
Total Number of Family Events*
School Name

Loess Hills Elementary

9

60

West Middle School

9

30

Form D1: 21CCLC Application Funding Request Summary
 

21CCLC TOTAL FUNDING REQUEST 

(Before and/or After School and Summer Program Funds) 

2

Number of program sites included in this application:

165

Total number of students being served (all sites for one year):

$208,500.00

Total first-year funding request (all sites):

Total three-year funding request (all sites):

$625,500.00

FUNDING FOR EACH SITE INCLUDED IN THIS APPLICATION 

NOTE: A program site may serve students from many schools. For example, a location that serves students from three (3) different schools would be considered one Program Site. 

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

Loess Hills Elementary

$135,000.00

$135,000.00

$135,000

$405,000

75

West Middle School

$54,000

$54,000

$54,000

$162,000.00

40

School Year

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

Loess Hills Elementary

$11,700.00

$11,700.00

$11,700.00

$35,100.00

30

West Middle School

$7,800.00

$7,800.00

$7,800.00

$23,400.00

20

Summer School

Form D4: Applicant Agency’s Fiscal Resource Information 

It is recommended that each applicant, including school districts, public entities, or government agencies, possess sufficient fiscal resources in order to start up and operate the program being requested for a period of up to three months. Please indicate if you are a public entity or a private/non-profit by checking the appropriate box below and then use the text box at the bottom of the page to answer the questions regarding fiscal resources for start-up costs and operational costs. 

Private Entity

In the textbox below, please describe your funding sources that can be used to start up and operate the program for up to three months. For example, public entities should include their budget line item number, account numbers, or any other applicable references. Private organizations should describe cash, lines of credit, emergency loans, etc. Fiscal resource information should be specific (e.g., bank or lender names; name of the holder of the account).

 

* Note: If you do not have the financial resources available equal to the amount of funding you are requesting, you do not have the financial capacity for this project. Agencies that do not have adequate fiscal resources on hand are eligible to participate in the application process. However, the applicant must describe in this section the agency’s plan to secure the necessary fiscal resources for this program application. 

Siouxland Human Investment Partnership has been incorporated as a non-profit organization since 1999 and responsively uses funds to meet all financial responsibilities. Per SHIP's completed independent audit report as of June 20, 2020, SHIP maintains the financial capacity to maintain the programs of our organization through the annual net activity of -$201,418 (Total Revenue $6,398,308; Total Expense $6,596,726) and net assets totaling $2,764,160.
Security National Bank of Sioux City, Iowa, serves as SHIP's financial institution. The bank provides for the secure holding of SHIP's funds, and SHIP utilizes a sweep account that automatically transfers funds between SHIP's regular checking account and an interest-bearing account as needed. The bank recognizes the diverse funding sources with which SHIP does business and the resulting array of payment schedules. As a result, Security National Bank provides SHIP a line of credit when needed without any maximum dollar amount. SHIP's allocations and grants are reimbursable funding streams; thus, SHIP's accounts receivable balance serves as the security for the line of credit.
Bank Information- Security National Bank, 601 Pierce Street, Sioux City Iowa 51102
Cash & Cash Equivalents (as of June 30, 2021)-$3,479,011
Accounts Receivable Balance (as of June 30, 2021)-$996,931

To view Forms D2 and D3, click the "View Document" buttons below. PDF versions are included at the end of this document but the information may not be split into multiple pages. 
 

Basic Service Components

If location for the program is different from the school where children attend, list both below:

West Middle School

School or Site/Building Name:

Loess Hills Computer Programming Elementary

School or Site/Building Name:

School or Site/Building Name:
Do you plan to provide any of the following to meet the nutrition/food access needs of students?

Full meal (best practice), Snack (required by federal statute)

Do you plan to follow best practices?

Yes, we will provide a free program to at-risk students in poverty as outlined in the guidance and consistent with the priority description in the application. All students on FRPL will attend for free. Best Practice is that applicants serve a minimum of 50% of FRPL children at each school in the application to receive the bonus points.

 
 

Site Information 

2022-2025 Site Profile 

Sioux City Community School District/ Beyond the Bell

School/Agency Name:

School Name
(can apply for up to 3 sites) 
School-Wide Information 

Grades Served by School 

Total Enrollment 

Free and Reduced Lunch Rate 

# Targeted Students 

Grades Served by Program 

BS

AS

SUM

Target Schools

Loess Hills Computer Programming Elementary

K-5

629

55%

K-5

75

75

30

West Middle School

6-8

985

72%

6-8

0

40

20

Total:

75

115

50