Oelwein Community School District

Application Information

Applicant Serving as Fiscal Agent (Applicant Agency):

Oelwein Community School District

County:

Fayette

Amount Requested:

$162,000

Director of Agency:

Contact Name:

Joshua Ehn

Agency Name:

Oelwein Community School District

Phone:

319-283-3536

Fax:

Email:

Grant Contact/Project Director: 

These fields will appear blank of the previous question was answered "Yes" and the Grant Contact/Project Director is the same as the Director of Agency. 

Contact Name:

Barb Schmitz

Agency Name:

Oelwein Community School District

Phone:

319-283-3536

Fax:

Email:

DUNS Number:

034638189

Is the Grant Contact/Project Director the same contact as the Director of Agency?

No

307 8th Ave. SE, Oelwein 50662

Address:

307 8th Ave. SE, Oelwein 50662

Address:

Data Collection and Evaluation Contact:

Contact Name:

Liz Hollingsworth - University of Iowa

Phone:

319-384-3543

Fax:

Email:

210F Lindquist, Iowa City 52242

Address:

Fiscal Contact:

Contact Name:

Michael Rueber

Phone:

319-283-3536

Fax:

Email:

307 8th Ave. SE, Oelwein 50662

Address:

Iowa 21st Century Community Learning Centers Request for Applications FY22

Past Grantee Supplemental Application Information

Have you ever been in non-compliance (received a letter notice from Iowa Department of Education stating non-compliance) with 21CCLC rules and regulations in the past three years? 

No

Did you meet your attendance goals for the past two years? (21CCLC funded sites are required to meet their attendance goals at a rate of 70% in year one and 80% by year three)

No

Please provide your enrollment numbers for the last three years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

2017-18: 363
2018-19: 365
2019-20: 353

Please provide your average daily attendance for the last threes years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

2017-18: 18
2018-19: 19
2019-20: 23

Did you meet your academic goals for the past two years?

Yes

How many of your local evaluation goals did you meet over the past two years?

75%

How much have office referrals been reduced over the past five years of your grant?

Less than 50%

After 5 years, how many community partners for sustainability have been recruited?

More than 10

Have you exceeded the snack requirement, by providing a full meal?

Yes

Have you participated in required committee work in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

Have you attended required Professional Development in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

How many parent engagement meetings did you have in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

2

How many field trips did you provide in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

11

Have you provided children with the required snack?

Yes

Are you charging program fees to families?

No

Form Documentation

Legal Status of Applicant
Request for Competitive Priority
Minority Impact Statement
Private School Consultation Meeting Log
Sustainability Plan
Past Grantee Sustainability Form (if applicable)
Community Partner Official Notice
View Document
Assurances & Agreements Required of All Applicants
Collaborative Signatures

MOUs

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Proposal Narrative

Abstract (Not scored)

The number of students served:

150

The total amount requested per year:

$162,000

The total amount per student:

$10.00

Request for funding: $162,000

Free and Reduced for Oelwein High School: 64%

Total Number of Students at Oelwein High School: 150

Before and After School: 90

Summer School: 60

 

The Oelwein Community School District and 21st Century Community Learning Center project will serve students in the Oelwein High School. The project will include all students but targeting students who need assistance in academic or social emotional development.

This project aims to operate a before and after school program, as well as a summer program that will include 45 days. The program will include healthy snacks and summer breakfast and noon meals for the students. Oelwein has successfully run the 21st Century project in the past and has seen growth in student achievement that includes attendance, academic achievement and social emotional growth.

Our research is evidence based in reading and math interventions, student learning, assessment and out of school program framework. The whole child will be supported through interventions with individual and small group instruction. Before and after school study tables will be supported by teachers and paraprofessionals to help with tutoring and mentoring in academic support. Summer school offers enrichment, credit recovery, field trips and alternative learning opportunities.

 

Various outreach strategies are used to share program information. All communication to students and families, such as paper materials, email contact, phone calls, social media and local newspaper will aid in the information chain to families. Classroom teachers will have access to all communication information to help students sign up for programing.

Partnerships are vital to the success of the program. In a smaller community, partners are limited. Oelwein has active partnerships and continues to build relationships with our community college, NICC, Upper Iowa University in Fayette, Iowa and Iowa State Extension. With other local partners we are able to receive many in-kind donations and volunteers.

 

Oelwein School district is requesting $162,000 to support programing that will be 5-7 days a week. Some programing will be on week-ends, for example; field trips, archery, robotics to name a few. The 21st Century Grant is an opportunity for our free and reduced lunch students who have limited access to enrichment to experience college visits, career exploration, and relationship building with staff with a 1:15 ratio.

Student Needs Assessments (20 possible points) 

Enrollment - Special Education - Free and Reduced Lunches

Oelwein Comm Sch - 1,325 - 294 - 64%

Oelwein High School - 376 - 58 - 64%

 

Academic and Enrichment Needs

Poverty continues to be a limiting factor in the education of Oelwein students. Students in our district often lack the funds to purchase basic necessities such as food, clothing, and hygiene products. This prevalent poverty severely limits many of our student’s life experiences as well as limits their ability to see beyond our small community. Students often work one or more part-time jobs to support themselves and their families while sharing childcare responsibilities for the family, putting strain on their academic development, socio-emotional health, and their opportunities to enjoy all of the different options high school has to offer. A recent survey found that approximately 60% of our students have a regular job or childcare responsibilities. Of that group of students, 20% of students are working more than 15 hours a week. This outside commitment takes time away that could be used participating in school activities with just over 19% of working students self-reporting that they don't participate in school activities due to their work schedules. One in five families are on food stamps and one in eight are below the poverty level. By providing enrichment, a nutritious meal, and support opportunities at varying times of the year we will increase the availability of academic, physical, and socio-emotional support to our students, and increase their overall academic performance and future life outcomes.

 

This poverty also limits students early on from participating in the different youth activities that many more affluent students have easy access to. Basketball, baseball, dance, etc., are all started at young ages and if a family does not have the funds for essential items it is highly unlikely that students will have the opportunity to participate in these more traditional activities. It should come as no surprise that when students at Oelwein High School were surveyed, almost 31% of students felt that the traditional activities offered did not reflect their interests. This leaves a large part of our student body disconnected from the school and this is reflected in our Conditions of Learning Results. The high school scored lower in both “Emotional Safety” and “Physical Safety” when compared to state averages. Part of this deficiency certainly can be attributed to students feeling disconnected from the goings-on of the district.

 

Academically, Oelwein High School also struggles in several major areas. In both reading and math, the scores for OHS are less than the state average and the graduation rate, when compared to the state average, is nearly 8% less. When looking at just the results for our lower socioeconomic students the picture is even more bleak; the graduation rate is over 10% lower than the state average. Once again the major culprit could be higher rates of poverty in our district. Students aren’t participating in activities and are unable to spend time focusing on academics as they are working to support their families or to look after siblings for parents that are at work.


While these statistics and observations may seem discouraging, a dive into some of our district testing data provides encouragement. In the last few years, through programs funded with this grant, our district increased the scores for students that participated in the support programs significantly more than students that did not. For students that participated and were in attendance 30 or more times, they, on average, saw higher rates of growth on both their reading and math scores on the Measure of Academic Progress adaptive test. With continued funding, our district can continue to innovate and create sustainable systems that will continue to bridge the gap between our students affected by poverty and those that are not.

 

Community Resources & Evaluation of Resources

Oelwein Public Library

  • Computers available after school hours, programs from various museums and guests, summer reading program: Academic, Enrichment

Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)

  • Community volunteers work with students, providing one on one assistance where needed: Academic, Enrichment

Biking/Hiking trails

  • Trails connect school and parks for fitness needs: Academic, Enrichment

Northeast Iowa Community College (NICC)

  • STEM Courses, CTE activities, Jobs Training: Academic

Oelwein Parks and Rec

  • Sports teams, recreation for fitness and leisure: Enrichment

ALl Families Matter

  • A support group for diversity issues for behavior/social needs for both students and parent literacy: Enrichment, Parent Lit.

Trap/Shooting Archery

  • Facility for instruction for hunting/safety needs: Enrichment

Northeast Iowa Dance Academy

  • Private lessons for all ages: Enrichment

Aquatic Center

  • Outdoor community pool for fitness, summer swimming: Enrichment

Regional Math and Science facility (RAMS)

  • OCSD and Northeast Iowa Community College (NICC) collaboration for STEM programs for academic needs: Academic Enrichment

Industrial Technology Cutting Edge Center

  • Separate facility located adjacent to the RAMS Center with cutting edge industrial technology equipment for CTE and practical arts projects operated in partnership with NICC: Academic Enrichment

Oelwein Wellness Center

  • Before and after school physical fitness in partnership with the City and Hospital for fitness clubs: Enrichment

Safe and Supportive Schools

  • A program of education and activities to develop positive behaviors in youth to meet needs in behavior/safety: Enrichment

Food and Fitness

  • Coordinator works with students to promote good health, parent/child interaction opportunities, and provide dinners:Enrichment, Parent Lit.

Activities Booster Club

  • A group to promote involvement in activities.: Enrichment

Fine Arts Guild

  • A group to promote involvement in the arts.: Enrichment

ISU Extension

  • Programs for developing leadership and team building.: Enrichment

Churchill Williams Athletic Performance Center

  • State of the art athletic facility attached to the Oelwein Middle School.: Enrichment


Documentation of how proposed program will address student needs (including working families)

The project and site directors will address identified student needs by the following:

  • Academic needs will be met with an hour of study time and tutoring before school and 90 minutes after school. Paid staff and volunteers will be available to assist students.

  • Enrichment clubs and activities targeting the interests of students through survey results will be scheduled by the Site Director to fit within students’ available time with an emphasis on “non-traditional” times to attract students with work schedules. These enrichment opportunities will be provided in collaboration with community partners.

  • Parent literacy activities will be provided to engage families and increase positive family/student/school interactions. These activities will be scheduled at convenient times for families to hopefully encourage participation.

At all times the program will monitor data and seek out student and parent input for the best ways to address the needs of students. The site director will be responsible for documentation of the number and types of activities provided to meet each identified need and work to ensure balance in the programs and activities available.






Transportation, Safety, and Accessibility Needs

The majority of students in the Oelwein School district live in town and have easy access to the school. If high school students don’t live within walking distance of the school, many others have the ability and means to drive to school. Students unable to walk or drive will have access to the bus system which will make use of its regular school drop off sites. Transportation to off-site activities will be provided through our program. Safety for students will be handled by regular school personnel assisted by responsible community members. Instructors will carry their cell phones in case of emergencies. Accessibility needs of students or parents with disabilities will be handled on an individual basis by the site director.

Project (24 possible points) 

Oelwein Community School District requests funding in the amount of $162,000 for the 21st Century Before/After and Summer Program at the Oelwein High School. This funding will provide programming for approximately 150 at risk students who depend on the school environment for their academic and social needs. The Oelwein High School has a strong history of providing academic support in a safe and supportive environment. The before/after and summer program will be called Husky Edge. The program at the high school will provide educational enrichment activities, mentoring and advocacy for at-risk students, and will provide support in the emotional and physical needs of our students. Husky Edge will provide a safe and stimulating environment for students at the high school during all programming.

 

Husky Edge will also support other programming that will include enrichment opportunities with technology, broadcasting, physical activities, trap shooting, archery, robotics, cooking, business clubs, mentoring and career exploration. The program will make college visits available for both students and parents. Field trips will be planned in the areas of music, art, drama, museums, and other cultural opportunities that rural communities do not have access to. Field trips will be a priority for students as access for enrichment activities are very limited. Students will have the opportunity to visit not only traditional educational field trips but also parks for geocaching, hiking, and even learning simple camping skills. The closest metropolitan area to Oelwein is 50 minutes away. The opportunity of field trips to larger communities is very valuable to our students. The students will also be taken to larger communities for exploration of colleges and universities. These trips will include parents/guardians and meals on campus with tours of the respective college campuses. This is not only a great way for students and their families to see different college campuses but also a way to expose students to opportunities that they might not typically be afforded. Exposing students to different types of programming is the best way for them to find their passions and their niche.

 

Oelwein School district has a rate of 64% free and reduced lunch. Many of the students are dealing with food insecurity and limited access to enrichment. Both of these factors increase the dropout rates for our district. According to the Fayette County Census, students who attend Oelwein High School have parents who have achieved less formal education compared to other high schools in our county. This statistic has a direct impact on parents' ability to help with homework or encourage homework completion.

 

Husky Edge will provide appropriate instruction at a 1:15 student teacher ratio. The school principal, Tim Hadley, along with teaching staff will design academic programming to help all students achieve academic success. The programming will align with the school day instruction and teachers from various disciplines, Math, English, History will facilitate the study tables for students before and after school. These tables offer students the opportunity to work with a teacher and in small groups or individually in a calm environment. Healthy snacks will be served.

 

All programs utilize a curriculum that is hands-on that will engage students in high interest and motivational learning. Iowa State Extension is a partner that offers babysitting curriculum and parenting classes for our students. Oelwein has an active community partnership with the City of Oelwein that enables community service opportunities that help our students invest in the community and develop a sense of pride. The Williams Wellness Center, a partner that is physically connected to our high school, offers an open gym and weight lifting for our students at various times throughout the week.

 

Students involved in Husky Edge also have access to the Oelwein School Nurse who teaches classes in health with our partner college, Northeast Iowa Community College, (NICC). The school nurse provides guidance in health and healthy living for students. The presence of a health professional will be an asset for the program.

 

Husky Edge will also work directly with the Special Education Department to engage students in programming that is offered to all students. This will allow more students to not only participate but build relationships within the school community. All students will be informed and invited to participate in Husky Edge.

Husky Edge will be open 7:00 AM to 8:00 AM five days a week and 3:20 to 5:30 PM 4 days a week. Summer school will be 45 days and will provide both breakfast and lunch for students.

The requirement of having the program of 60 hours per month will be met.

The goals for the Husky Edge program will include:

GOAL ONE: Increase student, parent and staff participation with the school.

GOAL TWO: Increase student attachment to education, to their peers, school activities, academic engagement and community.

  • Oelwein will address these goals by;
  1. Have a safe, consistent and positive learning environment in all of the programming.
  2. Provide before/after and summer study tables that include tutoring that is available to all students.
  3. Provide educational opportunities that include: career education, mentoring, field trips, physical education that is connected to life long healthy choices and academic support.
  4. Model and supply mental health programs that include social emotional learning, counseling services, healthy snacks and meals.
  5. Encourage family literacy through family engagement.

The Oelwein High School will support students by using the Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports, (PBIS), Programs. When possible students will receive direct instruction from teachers and qualified support staff on team building and physical activities. These components will create community and develop relationships among our at-risk students. Healthy snacks and meals will be served to ensure that all students are given the opportunity to benefit from healthy nutrition. These snacks and meals will also model life choices for better overall health.

 

The Oelwein Community School District’s motto is HEALTHY, HAPPY and AWESOME. All the programming will include this motto and work toward developing career ready students. The program will be offered 160 days per school year and 45 days in the summer. The Husky Edge program is free from discrimination and provides equal opportunities for all students. The program provides transportation for students to and from their homes by using all the bus stops and to small rural towns that are within the school district (Hazleton and Stanley). A large portion of the students are from these small communities that lack any youth facilities within their town limits and/or the access to transportation to travel to the metropolitan areas that do.

 

Information about the program will be provided through the school webpage, flyers, school announcements, school social media and direct communication with students, families and school staff. The school will also use the local media outlets, school concerts and sporting events where large groups of students and their families gather.

 

Husky Edge will have a program director and site director to oversee the daily operation of the program. The budget will reflect all the requirements by the state for materials, professional development, evaluation, administrative, and transportation. The school district's financial manager has extensive experience managing grants and works closely with the Iowa Department of Education.

The program will recruit, hire, and will train highly-qualified staff and provide staff with on-going professional development by partnering with Keystone AEA and the Oelwein School District. The program will report directly to the district Superintendent, Josh Ehn, the school board and advisory board developed by the program.

Research Base (5 possible points)  

Close Achievement Gaps: New research from Dr. Deborah Lowe Vandell and her colleagues at the University of California-Irvine School of Education shows that consistent participation in afterschool programs for older students decreases risky behaviors, leads to lower dropout rates, helps close achievement gaps, and students gain the skills needed for career and college readiness. More time in an afterschool program is linked to better work habits, improved academic performance, gains in self efficacy, improved GPA, increased attendance, and a reduction in behavior referrals. Vandell also found that engagement in fun activities that require focus build the competencies needed for academic learning including concentrations, motivation, and intrinsic reward. Thus increasing performance in reading and math scores (Vandell, 2016). We plan on offering a variety of activities and camps to spark motivation and increase consistent camp attendance.

 

Social and Emotional Learning (SEL): Evidence suggests that academic learning is connected to social and emotional development. According to a survey by the Riley Institute, “The top 5 skills developed by afterschool programs are teamwork, communication, problem solving, self-confidence, and critical thinking.” These skills are required for work and life in the 21st century. After School programs that target SEL outcomes see a wide-range of positive outcomes including: improved self-confidence and grades, increased positive attitudes toward school, higher attendance rates, and increased standardized test scores(Wallace & National Conference of State Legislature, 2018). Our program will address SEL needs by offering a variety of engaging activities that appeal to a diverse range of students.

 

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM): According to an article by the Afterschool Alliance, 80% of student learning takes place outside of school hours. Afterschool STEM can almost double the hours that students would normally have to engage in STEM activities, exploration and exposure to various topics, and careers. Afterschool STEM engages students in hands-on, real world projects that offer innovative ways to practice STEM skills in an informal space. This makes STEM more accessible and engaging for a diverse range of students. STEM jobs are expected to grow by 13% by 2027, but there aren’t enough qualified candidates to fill them. By 2025, more than 2 million STEM jobs will go unfilled due to the lack of skilled candidates (Afterschool Alliance, 2019). After School programs can help close that gap. We offer programs such as trap shooting, archery, Husky productions and broadcasting as well as activities incorporating art and business.

 

Family Engagement: Harvard research shows that family engagement in after school programs can lead to increased family involvement in children’s education, improved relationships between parents and children, and improved after school programs. This study identified three principles for effective family engagement. It’s a shared responsibility with a meaningful commitment to supporting children’s learning. It must be continuous and it must promote learning anytime, anywhere (Lopez & Caspe, 2014). This supports our plan to engage parents throughout their child’s public educational journey from birth to high school. Our plan provides out-of-school time with school and community partners to attract and engage parents in learning effective strategies to assist their children. Research shows the following strategies produced the highest effects for encouraging family engagement: family activity nights, night/weekend classes where food is provided, chaperoning field trips, showing youth’s work in academics and performances, increasing parent communication and offering adult education.

 

 

Management and Sustainability Plan (20 points) 

MANAGEMENT PLAN

Effective Staffing: Recruitment, Retention, Professional Development, Alignment with School Day, Volunteers

Ensure Effective Staffing:

The OCSD superintendent and the high school principal will serve as the administrators for the project. The district financial officer will be the fiscal agent with grant administration responsibility. This team will work with the project Director to insure compliance with both grant and fiscal administration. The superintendent, Josh Ehn, has worked with the 21st Century Edge grant program for 5 years. The High School principal, Mr. Tim Hadley, has enthusiastically endorsed the goals of this program and offers his complete support. Our K-12 Husky Adventures (the 21st Edge program) Program Director, Barb Schmitz, holds a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling and has been employed as the elementary counselor in Oelwein for 25 years. She has supervised the growth of this program, recruited high quality paid staff, volunteers, community partners, and effectively managed the budget. The Site Director for this project, Kelli Roth, served as the Safe Schools Project Director for three years.

Recruitment of Highly Qualified Staff

In the event present paid staff leave and must be replaced, the school district will follow typical hiring procedures to attract the right people for these positions. Staff must have the vision and the commitment to work in this program in addition to necessary qualifications. To recruit staff to work with students, principals explained the program, hours, and responsibilities to staff and many have already enthusiastically agreed to work with the program. Other Paraprofessionals will be recruited by following the same procedure as with the faculty. Recruitment of volunteer staff from the community is handled by personal contact with the Site Director and/or Project Director. Contacts with Upper Iowa University, NICC, and UNI connect Husky Edge with college mentors.

Retention of highly qualified staff

  • Pay. Our paid staff are offered a contract that is consistent with other employees with the same background and experience. Teachers for the program are offered $20 for each Club they lead.

  • Value: Personnel must know they are making a difference for students and their work is respected and valued. Feedback will be sought and given by the Site Director.

  • Time: Scheduling is also a positive factor in retention of teachers and volunteer leaders. They are able to work or volunteer for 8 weeks at a time or perhaps once per week for a longer time frame. This allows the leader to lead an activity that fits within their personal schedule.

  • Leadership: The Administrators, Program and Site Director will be essential leaders in retention of staff by stressing clear goals, open communication, consistent expectations, and positive relationships with staff and students. It is our intention to hire the right people, people who are committed to students and who enjoy making a difference in their lives.

  • Reputation: Our 21st Century Grant (Husky Adventures and Husky Edge) program K-12 has been successful with only two teachers in the beginning, rising to a total of 50 at present. Because of the established, successful reputation of this program we have seen improvements in attendance, partner growth, and decrease in office referrals district-wide.

Professional Development

Staff training will include the 21st Century grant expectations, data and reporting requirements and provided by paid Husky Edge staff and school administrators. Specific program training that is needed or required will be provided by Keystone AEA. Teachers now have the opportunity to participate in numerous virtual trainings and conferences.

Strong Program Leadership and alignment with school day instruction The Site Director will have daily contact with school personnel. Meetings with school and non-school personnel will be arranged to clarify the program, school policies, schedules, staff, curriculum, district non-confidential data, and parent programs. The building principal will approve activities to ensure alignment with school instruction. An implementation team with a representative from each grade level will review activities to ensure they are aligned with school day instruction.

Sustainability with our current Clubs and Summer School

We are running our summer program for 8-9 weeks (45 days) from 8:00-12:00 p.m. 5 days a week. We provide breakfast, lunch, and transportation within the school district. We provide face-to-face and virtual camps and tutoring. Counseling is offered with a professional therapist both virtual and face-to-face. We will continue college visits with parent involvement, field trips, and enrichment activities. The Farm Club is a popular activity in the summer because students take care of the greenhouse located at the high school. Our summer Band camp contains team building and social emotional components. From 8-10a.m., any student is invited to come to our Fitness program and work with certified coaches. This program includes a nutritious breakfast and is one of our most popular summer program offerings.

How the program will use volunteers to support high quality programming

The Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) program recruits over 50 people, ages 55 and older, each year to work one-on-one with students who need academic assistance. The RSVP supervisor works closely with 21st Century personnel and assists in recruiting and matching volunteers to programs.

Transportation-Safe Student Transportation To and From Program. Many High School students drive their own vehicles, but those needing transportation may board the school bus at the high school. Bus drop off points will include the regular in-town sites at the elementary buildings, Hazleton, a community two miles south of Oelwein, and Stanley, a community three miles east of Oelwein. Bus schedules will be distributed to students and parents and will be posted on the district web site. If needed, rides will be arranged for families to access to the Family Literacy goal. Students with disabilities will be provided the same kind of transportation they use for the regular school program ensuring adequate access to transportation. If needed, an aide can accompany a student with a disability. The Site Coordinator will work with the district transportation director to ensure that student needs are met. Translation services are normally provided for students who need it by paraprofessionals hired by the school district; however none are needed at the high school at this time. If that changes, paraprofessionals will be hired for translation. If needed, a translator can ride the bus with the student requiring this service. The Site Coordinator will work with parents and teachers to ensure translation needs are met.


Safe and accessible facilities:

Most programs will be held at the high school which is a safe and handicapped accessible facility. Some programs might be held in the Regional Academy for Math and Science or the Regional Tech Complex. Those facilities are also safe and handicapped accessible. Rooms have computer access, telephone access, first-aid supplies, and sufficient restrooms.

Organization and program leadership

The Superintendent, Principal, Business Manager, and Project Director work as a team to ensure grant and fiscal obligations are met. The Project Director is responsible for data collection, social media, attending state meetings via webinar, Advisory Board leadership, data collection for state review, creating and submitting state and federal reports, recruiting partners, articulate the program’s vision, mission, and goals of the afterschool program to staff, administrators, students, families, and community leaders to generate support, communicate the program progress to the community, ensure after school program compliance and quality, support strong, effective partnerships between schools and community youth development providers, support alignment between afterschool and school day; and alignment with the school district goals, work with administration to plan and implement appropriate staff development. The Site Director will maintain collaborative relations with staff and assist in recruiting needed personnel for the program. The Site Director will work to ensure that students receive after school learning experiences that support their academic and social emotional growth, health and well-being, college/career readiness, and school engagement/attendance. The Site Director will oversee the daily organization of clubs and other remedial activities, Work to ensure two-way communication with staff and to attend to staff needs for implementation of the program.

Advisory Board members will represent the K-12 program, including both the present Husky Adventures and the Husky Edge. This helps to ensure coordination between school sites. The present K-12 Advisory Board has established itself as a valuable team where members are engaged and committed. It consists of school administrators, teachers, project staff, 4 partners, parents, and student representatives. This board will meet six times per year with the Project Director serving as the chairperson for this group. This group will provide advice and support based on the non-confidential data and narrative reports provided to the board and will continually work to support the goals and objectives of this program.

Scope of Operations

The Husky Edge will operate for 60 minutes before school from 7:00 – 8:00 a.m. five days per week and from 3:20 p.m, 5:30 p.m. Monday – Thursday. Two family nights will be scheduled 2 times for year, averaging 2-3 hours for dinner and a family or parent education activity. (6 hours). The average monthly total will equal 60 hours per month. The program will run all year when school is in session. Summer School will be offered for 45 days in the summer, four hours per day including breakfast and lunch.

Continuous Program Improvement

The Oelwein Husky Edge will use the quantitative and qualitative evaluation reports from the evaluators to determine which goals are being met and which need additional emphasis. Recommendations for changes for improvements will follow this analysis and interpretations. Student interest in the program will be determined by analyzing the attendance patterns. Surveys and conversations with students and parents. The Site Director will be responsible to make program changes or locate suitable programs.

Sustainability:

A. Community Partners: We have worked with partners to maintain the sustainability of other projects and will continue to work with them for sustainability partners for the Husky Edge: Oelwein Public Library, United Way, Northeast Iowa Charitable Trust, MercyOne Hospital, Churches, Fareway, Alliant Energy, Norby’s, HyVee Dollar Fresh, Community Foundation of Fayette, Co., The City of Oelwein, Chamber of Commerce, and Northeast Iowa Community College. The strong community partnerships we have built helps to ensure that community partners invest in the programs, not only from a human resource perspective but also from a financial perspective whenever possible.

B. Each program is designed with long term sustainability in mind. To bring in therapy dogs and start a trap club we partnered with a local accounting firm to start independent 501(c)3 organizations to oversee their implementation. Husky Productions, Husky Broadcasting, and Husky Archery have all created and sustained their own fundraising within local Activities accounts to build independent sustainability. To develop and maintain strong community support for the Husky Edge Program we will make every effort to inform the public through local media resources of the activities and successes of the Husky Edge programs. The program will utilize Facebook and our District website houses our Husky Edge page which contains our yearly evaluation. All marketing efforts will be evaluated annually for their effectiveness in procuring community support. Sustainability planning must be creative, flexible, and rely on strong partners and internal support. As the grant matures and ultimately ends, other funds will have to be phased in which might include a fee-based program with a sliding fee scale, scholarships, applications for other grants and funding streams, and shifting of some resources.

Coordinated Resources. The school district provides spaces, office equipment, and custodial services. RSVP recruits volunteers. Title 1 programs will be coordinated with Husky Edge Program. Northeast Iowa Community College (NICC) and the Oelwein Public Library coordinate summer school activities with the Husky Edge programs. Federal nutrition program provides healthy snacks. Oelwein community gardens provide fresh produce to the schools.

Communication Plan (5 possible points)

Partnerships (10 possible points) 

Partnerships

Existing partners and their role. Each partner, as described below, has agreed to a commitment of time and expertise in the implementation of Husky Edge. They are committed to quality programming including the staffing, delivery, and full implementation of their role in Husky Edge.

 

Oelwein Schools

The school district will assist in hiring, providing space, administrative and custodial services, office equipment and supplies. The district will integrate programming into the school culture and will work with the Site Director to align program initiatives with the school program. The district’s Food Service provides USDA approved snacks and meals for summer programs.

Northeast Iowa Community College (NICC)

The Oelwein School and NICC partner to offer STEM projects. This partnership is also providing Career and Technical Education opportunities for program students NICC is also a partner in the Industrial Technology program. NICC also provides academic support and tutoring in reading, math, and financial literacy.

RAMS Center

The RAMS center is operated in collaboration by NICC and the Oelwein Schools and provides summer STEM activities.

Fayette County Extension Office

The Food Service provides USDA healthy snacks for the program.

Fidelity Bank and Trust

Provide programming to support students with financial literacy skills as well as partner with area businesses to provide engaging educational learning support.

Oelwein Public Library

The library will offer an after school program for two Wednesdays per month that the school dismisses early. They will provide camps for various genres of youth literature.

MercyOne Medical Center

The hospital nutritionist will provide a 21st Century Cooking camp for students, including nutrition information. Students also get the opportunity to tour medical facilities.

Oelwein Chamber and Area Development

The Oelwein Chamber and Area Development will partner with Oelwein High School by connecting students with local businesses to provide hands-on expertise in business and industry.

Upper Iowa University Tutors

Partnership provides tutoring and supplementing instruction in basic skills, and gives students an opportunity to increase college awareness and preparation. Tutoring is held on campus so students gain experience of navigating college life.

Oelwein Police Department

Police officers provide safe learning opportunities and educational presentations that enhance community oriented development. This partnership also helps to build relationships with students so that officers are perceived as a resource and means of support rather than just an agency that gets involved when crimes occur.

Local Banks

Banks will offer 21st Century Camps in Financial Literacy and Entrepreneurship.

Americorp Food Corp.

21st Century Camps will focus on education and guidance in healthy food selection choices that are interesting for youth. The camps will partner with the Farm Club.

Knights of Columbus

Provides coats, mittens and clothing for high school students.

Local Churches

Provide programs and resources to help students facing homelessness and lack of appropriate winter clothing.

Northeast Iowa Dance Academy

Academy hosts dance camps and provides use of their facility to give students a beginning experience with dance as a form of art.

Pawsitively Oelwein

Coordinates and provides the incorporation of several comfort support animals in the high school. The organization also helps provide staff and animal training and necessary insurance.

Fayette County Conservation

The County Conservation supports the Oelwein Trap Shooting Team by providing club memberships, facilities, and supplies. Club members mentor students and make facilities available.

Fontana County Conservation

Provides classes and events on topics related to nature and horticulture to students .

Oelwein Fine Arts Guild

Provides food and snacks for music camps and events.

Oelwein Booster Club

Provides food and snacks for athletic camps and events.

Williams Center for the Arts

The Williams Center for the Arts provides use of facilities for activities, events, and camps. Additionally, they offer free student admission to performances featuring acts from around North America. They also provide students who enjoy working with technology opportunities to grow in this area by helping backstage at professional level musical performances.



Oelwein Rotary Club

Rotary members contribute by mentoring students.

Iowa National Guard

The National Guard offers a variety of services and mentoring to students. They provide facilities for all students interested in archery and help to mentor students.

Oelwein Farmers Market

The Farmers Market offers a free food stand available to students.

 

Engaging Partners, Recruiting New Partners, and Maintaining Relationships.

Engaging Partners Over Lifetime of Grant

The majority of our partners have been with us since the beginning of our program in 2014. Our partners have been involved in the planning and designing of Husky Adventures and have taken ownership in their part of serving all students. As part of their commitment to the project, partners sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) before they begin their partnership. Partnerships are collaborative with the common mission of increasing literacy in math, reading, science, enrichment, family life and personal well-being. The Project Director and the Oelwein Superintendent maintain communication with all partners via email, face-to-face contact, social media, and through personal contacts in other community organizations.

Recruiting New Partners

As time and conditions change, new partners may develop activities that would be helpful to students and families or perhaps present partners may need to be replaced due to partnership change of focus. It will be the responsibility of the Program Director, with the assistance of the Advisory Committee, to recruit a partner who can fill gaps or provide different services due to changing families. As we celebrate the successes of Husky Edge, we anticipate that new partners will want to join us.

Maintaining Relationships

Our partners have been working together for 20 years and are committed to collaboration with the school to make a difference in the lives of children and families. Over the years, they have been willing partners in School Based Youth Services, Family Resource Centers, School to Work initiatives, and others. Through their participation with the schools and in the Interagency meetings, they have built trusting relationships and are able to communicate honestly about needs, promises, and pitfalls. Based on evidence of past collaboration, partnerships with other agencies and with the schools will continue because of the commitment of all organizations to meet the needs of youth and families.

Quarterly Schedule of Meetings

Quarterly meetings are scheduled for partners to discuss and coordinate plans for student activities. The meetings are chaired and agendas prepared by the Husky Edge Project Director. A schedule of meetings with partners who will be active each quarter will be prepared by the Project Director and provided to each partner for planning and communication purposes. Partners are invited to quarterly meetings during the quarter to plan, coordinate, implement, and evaluate their camps, events, and involvement. It is important to be aware of the time constraints of partners while maintaining a high degree of expectations for student success. Meeting dates, times, agendas, project information, and upcoming events are communicated with partners via email, phone, social media, and face-to-face contact.

Evaluation (10 possible points) 

Evidence that an experienced evaluator is in place

University of Iowa Center for Evaluation and Assessment, a well-known state and national statistician and evaluator, has agreed to be the evaluator for our Before/After/Summer school program. They have worked with Oelwein in the evaluation of the School Based Youth Services Program for the last 3 years. The Center for Evaluation and Assessment (CEA) provides third-party program evaluation, assessment, and other research services to a broad range of clients working in multiple programmatic areas. Dr. Liz Hollingworth is the Director and our contact person at the CEA. All requested program data will be provided to the state.

Evaluation Results: Results Used To Refine, Improve, And Strengthen The Program and Build Community Support

Evaluation reports will include non-confidential quantitative and qualitative data summaries written in language that is clear, interesting, and easy to understand. Anecdotal reports will be included. Those reports will be shared with school personnel, the Oelwein Board of Education, the SIAC committee, community groups and the general public for their feedback and suggestions to refine, improve, and strengthen the program. The final results and trend data will be analyzed 2-3 times a year by the Advisory Committee to determine areas for improvement. The advisory board will recommend changes to be implemented by the Program and Site Directors.

Evaluation procedures aligned with project goals (alignment with objectives and activities is shown in Sections 2 and 3.)

Goals:

  1. Improve Academic Achievement: By June 2026 students who have attended Husky CLC for 30 hours or more will reduce the proficiency gap between Non-SES and SES students in reading and math between all students and the state average.

  2. Provide enrichment services that reinforce and complement the academic program. By June of 2026, students who participated 30 or more hours will have discovered new interests and acquired new skills.

  3. By June of 2026, 75% of parents who have attended 5 parent meetings will support their child’s educational growth.

Data to evaluate project goals and objectives:

  • Husky CLC attendance-number and characteristics of students served

  • Classroom grades

  • ISASP

  • # of students earning credit recovery

  • # of students completing homework on time

  • Student record of new interest and skills learned

  • # of students intending to pursue post-secondary education

  • Student Classroom behaviors: motivation, participation, volunteering, and attentive



Data Collection

Superintendent and Curriculum Director, will collect the following and share with CEA:

Student achievement data from ISASP, FAST & NWEA MAP Assessments, activity and attendance logs will be collected for each activity, grade level reports will be collected each quarter from Infinite Campus, survey information will be collected from teachers, students, and families, and Iowa Youth Survey data. The Site Director will administer and collect facilities, safety, scheduling, and consumer satisfaction data to monitor program implementation

 

 

Budget Narrative (10 possible points) 

In detailing the justification of form D2 and formulating the completion of the form, certain constants were assumed. Among these constants were the assumption that our entire funding request would be spent within the 2022-2023 school year (fiscal year 2023) and, for simplicity, that each quarterly claim was uniformly written as one-fourth (25%) of the total annual funding request.

 

In reality, the district claims 21st Century expenses as incurred. For example, when claiming for our summer program, we would anticipate the majority of claims to be made in quarters one and four, whereas the lion’s share of before and after school claims we would anticipate to be made in quarters two and three. Because of the way staff is paid for work, the fourth quarter claim is generally the most cumbersome, as we have work being completed in June that is paid in July payroll. To further complicate the matter, our district pays staff twice per month, with the second payment coming after the July 15th claim deadline. Therefore, we attempt to claim as timely as possible, but the underlying assumption for this phenomenon is that we have some leeway on these summer claims on expenses that straddle fiscal years (e.g. it is possible to see some fourth quarter expenses carry into first quarter claims of the subsequent fiscal year). With these assumptions in mind, here is how the district originated the budget for the 2022-2023 school year.

 

Form D1 outlines an anticipated number of students before and after school of 90 with 150 days of operation, for a total of $135,000 in funding being requested. The anticipated number of students attending summer programming is 60 with 45 days of operation, for a total of $27,000. The sum of both programming efforts totals $162,000 for our 2022-2023 funding request.

 

Form D3 then outlines the spending within the five major trenches of program operation. Within the Program trench, Oelwein intends to spend $90,000 on personnel (teachers, aides, coordinators, etc.), $22,500 on materials and supplies, and $9,000 on snacks and meals. Historical analysis of grant trench spending supports the Program trench being weighted most heavily, with no year seeing less than 77% of grant expenses being attributed to the Program trench.

 

The Professional Development trench has been budgeted at the minimum of 5% for the grant year, which equates to $8,100. With the exception of fiscal year 2021, which saw very limited professional development opportunities due to the pandemic, Oelwein CSD has spent a minimum of $2,900 each of the past five years on professional development. In addition, with the lack of professional development opportunities in fiscal year 2021, a budget of $8,100 is not unreasonable, as opportunities should be in abundance in fiscal year 2023.

 

The Student Access trench has been budgeted at the maximum amount of 8% for the grant year, which equates to $12,960. With the exception of fiscal years 2020 and 2021 (both impacted mightily by the pandemic), Oelwein CSD has seen minimum transportation/student access spends of $3,150 each of the fiscal years 2017 through 2019, with each year steadily increasing to the apex of $9,941.55 in fiscal year 2019, before falling sharply in fiscal year 2020. Again, with the lack of opportunities for travel impacted by the pandemic in fiscal years 2020 and 2021, we anticipate more opportunities for travel in fiscal year 2023.

 

The Evaluation trench has been budgeted at the maximum amount of 4% for the grant year, which totals $6,480. Given the historical spends of the district, and the impact of learning loss, this budgeted amount does not appear to be out of line.

 

Finally, the Other Admin trench is budgeted at the maximum of 8% for the grant year, equating to $12,960. With this trench as well, historical spends support the budgeted amount of $12,960 for fiscal year 2023.

 

The district has struggled to continue with programming supported by the 21st Century grant in the 2021-2022 school year, as funding was not awarded. However, with other federal funding such as ESSER and ARP, which allow for spending on programs to combat learning loss, we have been able to keep certain programs previously funded by the 21st Century grant (such as our after school study tables) on life support. Fortunately with other programs, most of the supply costs were absorbed when 21st Century grant funding was available. The hope is to further enhance (supplement) budgets for those programs to allow continued growth and development (enhancements) for long-term stability and student engagement. A few of these programs include our archery program, which sees substantial community support and revenue generated through hosting tournaments; our Husky Productions program, which sees support from surrounding communities as well as our own for media coordination at events such as weddings, community celebrations, holidays, etc.; and our Big Dog Coffee Shop, which sees support from the community, our staff, and students when purchasing coffee and/or breakfast. All of these program examples would not have been possible without substantial start-up investment from the 21st Century grant funding. They are sustainable programs because of the initial investment made as seed capital to purchase equipment such as targets for the archery program or electronics equipment for Husky Productions. These programs have made a powerful impact on the students involved and helped bring positive momentum to our community. To ensure continued success and forward momentum, the programs will require maintenance and we are therefore seeking additional 21st Century grant funding.

 

Regarding partnerships with the district, our community is engaged with the school district. In terms of corporate partners, most of those opportunities are being sought by our Career Pathways Coordinator and that program (e.g. job shadowing, training, etc.). We have fostered partnerships with the City of Oelwein to offer younger levels swimming lessons during summer programming, perhaps something beneficial in the future would be to partner with the City of Oelwein or the Red Cross to see if some of our high school students would be a good fit for the lifeguard training for the local aquatics center.

Supplemental Materials

Before School (BS) Site Operations

Estimated Start Date:

August 23, 2022

Estimated End Date:

May 24, 2023

Total Number of Service Days:

178

Total hours of Before School services per typical week:

8

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

8:00am

8:00am

8:00am

8:00am

8:00am

1

1

1

1

1

Saturday

9:00

12:00

3

After School (AS) Site Operations

Total hours of After School services per typical week:

12

Total Number of Service Days:

144

Estimated End Date:

May 24, 2023

Estimated Start Date:

August 23, 2022

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

3:20pm

3:20pm

2:20pm

3:20pm

0

5:30pm

5:30pm

5:30pm

5:30pm

0

2

2

3

2

0

Saturday

9:00

12:00

3

Summer (SUM) Site Operations

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

8:00am

8:00am

8:00am

8:00am

8:00am

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

4

4

4

4

4

Saturday

0

0

0

Estimated Start Date:

June 5, 2023

Estimated End Date:

August 4, 2023

Total Number of Service Days:

45

Total hours of Summer services per typical week:

20

Adult Family Member Services

All 21CCLC programs are required to host a minimum of four family-centered events each year. A general rule of thumb is one per quarter. Examples of events include back-to-school celebrations, literacy nights, family game nights, recreational events, guest speakers, and so on. 

Describe Frequency, Duration, and Dosage:

A family engagement conference will be held twice a year.
Meals, Speakers, and breakout sessions are provided for 2 hours for up to 150 parents.

Estimated Total Number of Adult Family Members Served:*
Total Number of Family Events*
School Name

Oelwein High School

2

150

Form D1: 21CCLC Application Funding Request Summary
 

21CCLC TOTAL FUNDING REQUEST 

(Before and/or After School and Summer Program Funds) 

1

Number of program sites included in this application:

150

Total number of students being served (all sites for one year):

$162,000

Total first-year funding request (all sites):

Total three-year funding request (all sites):

$486,000

FUNDING FOR EACH SITE INCLUDED IN THIS APPLICATION 

NOTE: A program site may serve students from many schools. For example, a location that serves students from three (3) different schools would be considered one Program Site. 

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

Oelwein High School

$135,000

$135,000

$135,000

$405,000

90

School Year

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

Oelwein High School

$27,000

$27,000

$27,000

$81,000

60

Summer School

Form D4: Applicant Agency’s Fiscal Resource Information 

It is recommended that each applicant, including school districts, public entities, or government agencies, possess sufficient fiscal resources in order to start up and operate the program being requested for a period of up to three months. Please indicate if you are a public entity or a private/non-profit by checking the appropriate box below and then use the text box at the bottom of the page to answer the questions regarding fiscal resources for start-up costs and operational costs. 

Public Entity

In the textbox below, please describe your funding sources that can be used to start up and operate the program for up to three months. For example, public entities should include their budget line item number, account numbers, or any other applicable references. Private organizations should describe cash, lines of credit, emergency loans, etc. Fiscal resource information should be specific (e.g., bank or lender names; name of the holder of the account).

 

* Note: If you do not have the financial resources available equal to the amount of funding you are requesting, you do not have the financial capacity for this project. Agencies that do not have adequate fiscal resources on hand are eligible to participate in the application process. However, the applicant must describe in this section the agency’s plan to secure the necessary fiscal resources for this program application. 

$40,500 will be required from Oelwein School General Operating fund.

$25,000 - Salary
$5000 - FICA
$6000 - IPERS
$4500 - Supplies

To view Forms D2 and D3, click the "View Document" buttons below. PDF versions are included at the end of this document but the information may not be split into multiple pages. 
 

Basic Service Components

If location for the program is different from the school where children attend, list both below:

School or Site/Building Name:

Oelwein High School

School or Site/Building Name:

School or Site/Building Name:
Do you plan to provide any of the following to meet the nutrition/food access needs of students?

Full meal (best practice), Backpack program (https://www.foodbankiowa.org/backpack), Snack (required by federal statute)

Do you plan to follow best practices?

Yes, we will provide a free program to at-risk students in poverty as outlined in the guidance and consistent with the priority description in the application. All students on FRPL will attend for free. Best Practice is that applicants serve a minimum of 50% of FRPL children at each school in the application to receive the bonus points.

 
 

Site Information 

2022-2025 Site Profile 

Oelwein School District

School/Agency Name:

School Name
(can apply for up to 3 sites) 
School-Wide Information 

Grades Served by School 

Total Enrollment 

Free and Reduced Lunch Rate 

# Targeted Students 

Grades Served by Program 

BS

AS

SUM

Target Schools

Oelwein High School

9-12

353

64%

150

50

100

60

Total:

50

100

60