Des Moines Independent Community School District

Application Information

Applicant Serving as Fiscal Agent (Applicant Agency):

Des Moines Independent Community School District

County:

Polk

Amount Requested:

$298,800

Director of Agency:

Contact Name:

Dr. Thomas Ahart

Agency Name:

Des Moines Independent Community School District

Phone:

(515) 242-7766

Fax:

NA

Email:

Grant Contact/Project Director: 

These fields will appear blank of the previous question was answered "Yes" and the Grant Contact/Project Director is the same as the Director of Agency. 

Contact Name:

Heidi Brown

Agency Name:

Des Moines Independent Community School District

Phone:

(515) 242-7561

Fax:

NA

Email:

DUNS Number:

78072899

Is the Grant Contact/Project Director the same contact as the Director of Agency?

No

2100 Fleur Drive, Des Moines 50321

Address:

1000 Porter Ave, Des Moines 50315

Address:

Data Collection and Evaluation Contact:

Contact Name:

Jocelyn Sturgis

Phone:

(515) 242-7838

Fax:

NA

Email:

1000 Porter Ave, Des Moines 50315

Address:

Fiscal Contact:

Contact Name:

Kevin Oleson

Phone:

(515) 242-7834

Fax:

NA

Email:

2100 Fleur Drive, Des Moines 50321

Address:

Iowa 21st Century Community Learning Centers Request for Applications FY22

Past Grantee Supplemental Application Information

Have you ever been in non-compliance (received a letter notice from Iowa Department of Education stating non-compliance) with 21CCLC rules and regulations in the past three years? 

No

Did you meet your attendance goals for the past two years? (21CCLC funded sites are required to meet their attendance goals at a rate of 70% in year one and 80% by year three)

Yes

Please provide your enrollment numbers for the last three years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

2020-21: 1,096 – due to Covid-19 pandemic
2019-20: 1,936
2018-19: 1,897

Please provide your average daily attendance for the last threes years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

2020-21: 530/day
2019-20: 829/day
2018-19: 804/day

Did you meet your academic goals for the past two years?

Yes

How many of your local evaluation goals did you meet over the past two years?

100%

How much have office referrals been reduced over the past five years of your grant?

Less than 50%

After 5 years, how many community partners for sustainability have been recruited?

More than 25

Have you exceeded the snack requirement, by providing a full meal?

Yes

Have you participated in required committee work in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

Have you attended required Professional Development in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

How many parent engagement meetings did you have in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

4

How many field trips did you provide in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

4

Have you provided children with the required snack?

Yes

Are you charging program fees to families?

No

Form Documentation

Legal Status of Applicant
Request for Competitive Priority
Minority Impact Statement
Private School Consultation Meeting Log
Sustainability Plan
Past Grantee Sustainability Form (if applicable)
View Document
Community Partner Official Notice
View Document
Assurances & Agreements Required of All Applicants
Collaborative Signatures

MOUs

Applicants were required to upload at least 5 and up to 10 MOUs. Not all buttons below will have an MOU attached. 

MOU Upload 1
MOU Upload 2
 MOU Upload 3
MOU Upload 4
MOU Upload 5
MOU Upload 6
MOU Upload 7
MOU Upload 8
MOU Upload 9
MOU Upload 10

Proposal Narrative

Abstract (Not scored)

The number of students served:

249

The total amount requested per year:

$298,800

The total amount per student:

$1,200

Students Needs Assessment: Des Moines Public Schools (DMPS) conducted an extensive needs assessment of student risk factors for academic failure (low achievement, low income, high absenteeism, behavior referrals, English Language Learner status, and minority race) at Madison, Oak Park, and Windsor Elementary schools. Results indicated pronounced achievement gaps in reading and math, a high percent of students who are chronically absent, and a high percent of students who do not feel a sense of belonging at school. Several students have received two or more Level 2 referrals for behavior. All three schools are Title I eligible and Oak Park is designated "targeted" on the Iowa School Performance Profile. To address these risk factors, DMPS proposes to implement the 21st Century Community Learning Centers afterschool program at each site. The Project Coordinators collaborated with community partners, principals, and other stakeholders for their input on program design. Parents and students were surveyed to determine activities of interest, best hours for programming, transportation needs, and other feedback. Results indicate high interest in afterschool programming that offers academic support and a variety of educational enrichment activities, as well as family literacy events.

 

Project: DMPS will use the Needs Assessment results to inform the proposed afterschool program plan. Aligned with ESSA's Measures of Effectiveness, the program will include evidence-based academic support, educational enrichment, and family literacy activities to improve academic performance in core areas (reading and math) and to improve behavior and attendance. The program will align with daytime classroom instruction (district and state standards; CSIP) and be differentiated to meet students’ needs. Three hours of academic support (tutoring, English language acquisition, small group instruction, homework help) and educational enrichment activities (high-interest, challenging activities that complement academics) will be offered to help students develop academic skills and social-emotional skills. Overall goals will focus on increasing reading and math achievement, decreasing absenteeism, and increasing students’ sense of belonging at school. The goals of family literacy events are to encourage positive parent-child interactions and improve engagement in support of students’ academic success, with activities focused on students' reading and math literacy. Parents in need of adult literacy classes will be referred to Des Moines Area Community College adult literacy classes (through Evelyn K. Davis Center). DMPS currently implements successful 21stCentury Community Learning Centers programs at 15 schools, evidenced by students' increases in academic performance and proficiency levels.

 

Research Base: Past evaluation of other DMPS grant cohorts have shown positive results. Combined successes include: 42% of regular attendees met benchmark goals on reading assessments, 43% of regular attendees met benchmark goals on math assessments (which exceeded the district average of 38% meeting benchmark on math assessments). 6% of students who regularly attended 21CCLC programs received greater than 2 level 2 or higher behavior referrals, while 7% of non-participating district students received greater than 2 level 2 or higher behavior referrals over the course of the school year. Evidence-based curriculum aligned to district and state standards will be implemented (EL Literacy, IM Math, WRiTE BRAiN, Restorative Practices).

 

Management and Sustainability Plan: Each school will have a full-time site coordinator (Community School Coordinator) who will oversee day-to-day programming and collaborate with parents, staff, and community partners toward program goals. Each site will be supported by district Project Coordinators, Director of Community in Schools, Bilingual Family Liaison Specialist, Community Partnership Coordinator, and Executive Director of Student and Family Services to ensure activities are pedagogically sound and aligned with school day instruction. 21CCLC staff will attend at least eight hours of professional development each year on topics such as: ELL, YPQA, reading, math, and equity. Volunteers, including senior citizens and Silver Cord students, will assist with program activities. DMPS will provide bussing to and from the program, as needed. A Leadership Team will serve as an advisory council and meet monthly to evaluate ongoing program results and needed modifications. The Team will also raise visibility of successes to garner community support and identify partners for program sustainability.

 

Communication Plan: Outreach activities will convey program successes publicly, in a reader-friendly format, published on the DMPS 21CCLC website (monthly updates), stakeholder reports, DMPS-TV and social media, community presentations as well as state and national conferences.

 

Partnerships: As evidenced by the attached MOU's and letters of support, DMPS will partner with five full partners: Afterschool Arts Program (ASAP) (programming), Iowa State University Extension-Polk County (programming); Build Lincoln Higher (programming), Primary Health Care (physicals, health services); and YMCA (programming). Families will be referred to Evelyn K. Davis (EKD) to access adult literacy courses through DMACC. With Advisory Committee and stakeholder input to identify other prospective partners, Project Coordinators will develop new partners throughout the grant cycle (programming, volunteer opportunities, funding, etc.). To retain partners, DMPS will foster open, ongoing communication with partners and a continuous feedback loop to guide program modifications and ensure joint goals are met.

 

Evaluation: A comprehensive, rigorous external evaluation of qualitative and quantitative measures will assess the effectiveness of the 21CCLC program. An external evaluator (FDSG Consulting) will collect and analyze quantitative (formative and summative data, behavior and attendance data) and qualitative data (parent and student survey data) to ensure outcomes are met. Data will be housed 


in the Infinite Campus database system. The Youth Development Program Quality Assessment Tool, implemented by Community Youth Concepts, will gauge program effectiveness yearly. Annual APR reports will be completed using the federal database. Using external measures and internal measures, evaluation results will be reviewed by Project Coordinators and the Leadership Team for areas of needed modification to strengthen the program. Required annual reports to the funder will be completed. The summative local evaluation report will include annual measures that provide external criteria of success. DMPS will provide all required state and federal data collection, reporting, and monitoring.

 

Budget Narrative: The funding formula is based on the number of students served times the number of days of programming times the cost of programming per student, per day: 249 students x 160 days x $7.50/student/day = $298,800/year ($99,600/site), detailed in section 9.

 

Documentation of Competitive Priority Status:The three selected schools are all Title I eligible and Oak Park is designated "targeted" on the Iowa School Performance Profile. DMPS is submitting this application in collaboration with Iowa State University Extension- Polk County, the YMCA, Primary Healthcare, Build Lincoln Higher, and Afterschool Arts program, as evidenced by the attached MOU's and original signatures on Form C: Collaborative Signatures.

Student Needs Assessments (20 possible points) 

2.1 Demographic data demonstrating student need

The Des Moines Public Schools (DMPS) 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21CCLC) program aligns with ESSA's Measures of Effectiveness, based on a needs assessment for before and after school programs using objective data. The assessment examined students, schools, and community resources, focused on risk factors for academic failure: achievement, low-income (FRPL), attendance (ADA), behavior, race/ethnicity, and English Language Learner (ELL) status. Objective data results are shown below, indicating a high need for afterschool programs to address risk factors at Madison, Oak Park, and Windsor elementary schools. All schools are Title I eligible and Oak Park is designated "targeted" on the Iowa School Performance Profile. Each of the identified schools will serve 83 regular attendees per year.

 

SITE ELIGIBILITY:

MADISON: Title I eligible, designated “acceptable” on the Iowa School Performance Profile. FY22 Enrollment=239, ELL=47%, and Minority=77%. FY21 FRPL=88.3% (Community Eligibility Provision) and ADA=92.3%.

OAK PARK: Title I eligible, designated “targeted” on the Iowa School Performance Profile. FY22 Enrollment=304, ELL=34%, and Minority =74%. FY21 FRPL%=86.5% (Community Eligibility Provision) and ADA=85.1%.

WINDSOR: Title I eligible, designated “acceptable” on the Iowa School Performance Profile. FY22 Enrollment=285, ELL=23%, and Minority=42%. FY21 FRPL=60.7% (Community Eligibility Provision) and ADA=92.1%.

 

LITERACY AND MATH DATA: A high percent of students are not proficient or meeting benchmarks in literacy and math, shown below. The achievement gap is pronounced when broken down by income, race/ethnicity, and language, showing the need for afterschool programs.

 

LITERACY: Grades 3-5 ISASP 2020-21 (% Proficient and Advanced)

MADISON: Total # assessed=122. Total proficient=31.1%. Proficiency by sub-group: Non-FRPL=31.3%, FRPL=31.1%, Non-minority=38.9%, Minority=29.8%, Non-ELL=44.7%, ELL=8.7%.

OAK PARK: Total # assessed=147. Total proficient=36.7%. Proficiency by sub-group: Non-FRPL=68.4%, FRPL=32.0%, Non-minority=52.8%, Minority=31.5%, Non-ELL=48.0%, ELL=12.8%.

WINDSOR: Total # assessed=124. Total proficient=58.9%. Proficiency by sub-group: Non-FRPL=87.9%, FRPL=51.5%, Non-minority=65.7%, Minority=49.0%, Non-ELL=65.8%, ELL=0%.

 

MATH: Grades 3-5 ISASP 2020-21 (% Proficient and Advanced)

MADISON: Total # assessed=122. Total proficient=39.3%. Proficiency by sub-group: Non-FRPL=37.5%, FRPL=39.6%, Non-minority=55.6%, Minority=36.5%, Non-ELL=51.3%, ELL=19.6%.

OAK PARK: Total # assessed=147. Total proficient=24.5%. Proficiency by sub-group: Non-FRPL=52.6%, FRPL=20.3%, Non-minority=41.7%, Minority=18.9%, Non-ELL=33.0%, ELL=6.4%.

WINDSOR: Total # assessed=124. Total proficient=62.1%. Proficiency by sub-group: Non-FRPL=69.6%, FRPL=55.9%, Non-minority=65.8%, Minority=56.9%, Non-ELL=66.7%, ELL=23.1%.

 

BEHAVIOR AND ATTENDANCE DATA: The tables below show behavior and attendance data. The behavior data shows a high percent of students do not feel a sense of belonging at school, an important indicator of engagement, and several students have received two or more Level 2 referrals for behavior at each school. The attendance data shows a high percent of students chronically absent at the three locations.

 

SEL: FALL 2021 PANORAMA – PERCENT FAVORABLE FOR “SENSE OF BELONGING.”

MADISON: building wide % favorability: 74% Broken down by sub-group: Non-FRPL=74%, FRPL=75%, Non-minority=76%, Minority=72%, Non-ELL=73%, ELL=77%.

OAK PART: building wide % favorability: 65% Broken down by sub-group: Non-FRPL=71%, FRPL=64%, Non-minority=56%, Minority=67%, Non-ELL=63%, ELL=69%.

WINDSOR: building wide % favorability: 65% Broken down by sub-group: Non-FRPL=66%, FRPL=64%, Non-minority=62%, Minority=68%, Non-ELL=66%, ELL=62%.

 

FY2020-21 BEHAVIOR DATA:

MADISON: Total # of 2 or more Level 2 referrals=13.

Percent of students with 2 or more Level 2 referrals: 4.7%. Broken down by sub-group: Non-FRPL=0.0%, FRPL=5.2%, Non-minority=5.7%, Minority=4.4%, Non-ELL=6.0%, ELL=1.7%.

OAK PARK: Total # of 2 or more Level 2 referrals=16.

Percent of students with 2 or more Level 2 referrals: 4.5%. Broken down by sub-group: Non-FRPL=2.0%, FRPL=4.9%, Non-minority=3.2%, Minority=5.0%, Non-ELL=5.7%, ELL=1.8%.

WINDSOR: Total # of 2 or more Level 2 referrals=7.

Percent of students with 2 or more Level 2 referrals: 2.3%. Broken down by sub-group: Non-FRPL=0.0%, FRPL=3.52%, Non-minority=2.8%, Minority=1.6%, Non-ELL=2.4%, ELL=1.8%.

 

FY2020-21 ATTENDANCE DATA:

MADISON: Percent of students chronically absent: 27.4%. Broken down by sub-group: Non-FRPL=4.0%, FRPL=29.8%, Non-minority=24.3%, Minority=28.5%, Non-ELL=31.1%, ELL=21.8%.

OAK PARK: Percent of students chronically absent: 61.0%. Broken down by sub-group: Non-FRPL=40.0%, FRPL=62.6%, Non-minority=50.5%, Minority=64.7%, Non-ELL=61.3%, ELL=60.2%.

WINDSOR: Percent of students chronically absent: 29.5%. Broken down by sub-group: Non-FRPL=15.1%, FRPL=36.2%, Non-minority=21.1%, Minority=41.5%, Non-ELL=24.7%, ELL=50.9%.

 

SCHOOL/COMMUNITY RESOURCES: While several other community organizations provide afterschool activities for youth, they are not necessarily available to Madison, Oak Park, and Windsor students due to barriers such as transportation, cost, and/or intermittent offerings.

The YMCA (John R. Grubb and Walnut Creek Family) offers recreational programs, but they are not offered consistently as an afterschool option. Memberships to access programming can be cost-prohibitive for the majority of DMPS families who are low-income, making open gym and programming inaccessible. (Note: as part of this grant, DMPS will partner with the YMCA to provide fitness programs at proposed grant sites, and they will provide bussing to take students to their site for “Safety Around Water” programming). Des Moines Parks and Recreation partners with DMPS to offer reduced cost programming to families who are low-income. Many of these programs are offered seasonally based on activity, rather than as a consistent afterschool program. Camp Fire Heart of Iowa offers a variety of youth development programming; however, afterschool programming is not offered. Highland Park Community Church offers a STEM-focused camp in the summer; however, it serves middle school students. Other barriers to existing afterschool programs include cost (Science Center of Central Iowa) sporadic offerings (Des Moines Public Library), and/or lack of alignment with school instruction. There are no options for students who have challenging behaviors. Specific to family programming, the Evelyn K. Davis Center for Working Families (EKD) offers a wide variety of programs for families focused on helping them achieve their education and career goals (e.g., financial literacy, digital literacy, workforce training, among others). In addition to partnering with the YMCA, DMPS proposes to partner with After School Arts Program (ASAP), ISU Extension, Build Lincoln Higher, and Primary Health Care for programming and services (full partners, in-kind). DMPS will also partner with EKD for family-focused programming. Programming will occur on-site at the three elementary schools to ensure families have access to the offerings, offering financial literacy boot camps for the entire family, focused on achieving financial self-sufficiency. Students will have the opportunity to practice math skills, and families will gain access to a free financial coach to help them achieve their goals. (see section 7 Partnerships for more details). Des Moines Area Community College offers HiSET testing and instruction online or in-person at EKD, and we will partner with them by offering referrals to parents of 21CCLC students who are interested in earning a High School Equivalency (HSE) diploma.

 

In response to the risk factors listed above, DMPS proposes the 21stCentury Community Learning Centers (21CCLC) afterschool program to offer academic support (reading and math) and enrichment activities to improve students’ academic growth and engagement. The program will be offered a minimum of 15 hours per week during the school year, open to all students in each school. Students will receive differentiated academic support (tutoring, small group instruction, homework help,) from certified teachers and community partners utilizing evidence-based curriculum aligned with classroom instruction. Students will be provided engaging educational enrichment activities (guided by student/ stakeholder surveys; provided by qualified staff and community partners) to gain social, emotional, and physical literacy skills via programs aligned to academic instruction. Monthly family literacy events will be held to increase parent-child engagement and promote academic success, accommodating working families’ schedules to the extent possible. The schools serve a high percent of ELL students who have transportation and language barriers and students who have disabilities or need special accommodations. DMPS Bilingual Family Liaisons provide translation services as needed for students and families. DMPS will provide safe transportation to and from the program and ensure accessibility to and safety of program facilities (specialized supports and modifications for students with disabilities or emotional-behavioral needs, ADA compliance, secured entries and classrooms, etc.) so that all participants have equitable access to participate (detailed in section 5.2).

 

2.2 Evidence of stakeholder engagement in needs assessment and program development

The 21CCLC Project Coordinators assessed the needs of stakeholders, while principals and site coordinators collected parent and student interest surveys to gather data that informed program design, indicating great interest in the 21CCLC program. DMPS staff collected feedback from families, indicating high interest in afterschool programs and family literacy events. The Project Coordinators collaborated with community partners to explore joint goals for the program, social-emotional learning (SEL), whole-student health (nutrition education, providing meals and access to community food pantries or other resources, and physical literacy), early literacy (phonics, sight words, emergent reading), a variety of engaging fine arts opportunities, and many others (detailed in Section 7, letters of support, and MOU’s). Staff will collaborate internally with SUCCESS, Counselors, Community Schools, Special Education staff and ELL staff for guidance on program design to meet identified student and family needs and for other services (translation, special needs, referrals to community providers, etc.), and Food and Nutrition Services staff for snacks and meals that meet USDA guidelines. Input from students and parents is vital to successful program design and implementation. Student feedback: 90% of students reported they 


wanted to participate in after school programs, 73% indicated they want to try new things (cooking, basketball, LEGOs, etc.), 70% want to make friends, 66% want to play sports, 61% want to be with adults who care about them, 29% want to get better at reading, and 24% want to get better at math. Also, 89% of parents surveyed indicated they believe after school programs benefit youth, 92% indicated their child would participate in an afterschool program if it was available to them. Throughout the year, 21CCLC staff will seek student and parent input to guide program design, including at the end of each program activity to gauge ongoing program topics of interest.

Project (24 possible points) 

3.1 Evidence linking needs assessment to proposed activities; curriculum; program goals

The extensive data collected in the needs assessment in section 2, aligns to ESSA's Measures of Effectiveness 1, "assessment of objective data regarding the need for before and after school programs and activities." This data directly ties to the proposed program’s SMART performance measures, aligned to Measures of Effectiveness 2, "be based upon an established set of performance measures aimed at ensuring the availability of high-quality academic enrichment opportunities." The needs assessment shows the pronounced achievement gap in literacy and math proficiency scores, guiding decisions to offer daily academic support focused on literacy and math (tutoring, small group instruction, homework help, family literacy events) that utilizes evidence-based curriculum (EL Literacy, IM Math, WRiTE BRAiN, Restorative Practices), which aligns with Measures of Effectiveness 3, “scientifically-based research that provides evidence that the program will help students meet the district academic achievement standards…” (see section 4 Research Base for more information).

Data from students, parents, staff, and community partners discussed in Section 2 will inform ongoing program activities focused on academic support and enrichment. Reading and math will be incorporated into programming through high interest enrichment activities via community partners (STEM, cooking, robotics, arts, gardening, sports, and others detailed below) to engage students in the program. These high interest activities, the supportive relationships students build, the focus on Restorative Practices, and DMPS' equity framework (built into professional development) will positively impact student attendance and engagement, addressing behavior and attendance needs identified in section 2. Site Coordinators will coordinate with classroom teachers to ensure activities meet the needs of students and align to the school day academic program, as evidenced by SMART performance indicators and measures and associated data collection and analysis by staff (Measures of Effectiveness 4, “Ensure the measures of student success align with the regular academic program of the school and the academic needs of participating students and include performance indicators and measures” and 5, “And collect the data necessary for the measures of student success described in 4.”). Family engagement activities will support students’ literacy needs and encourage school engagement, such as guest speakers at Family Night events, providing meals to families, engaging enrichment family activities, Chess Night, Makers Convention, etc. Given the high percent of ELL families served by DMPS, program staff and Bilingual Family Liaisons will refer ELL families and all other families in need to adult literacy programs by Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC) in partnership with Evelyn K. Davis Center for Working Families. Staff will communicate information about this adult literacy program to all 21CCLC program families.

 

3.2 Variety of 1) academic, 2) enrichment, and 3) family literacy/engagement services fitting eligible federal activities and supporting literacy and math outcomes; daily meals and snacks

The 21CCLC program will be based on best practices for instruction, youth development, and family literacy. It will comply with federal guidelines, and it will incorporate positive youth development, focusing on students’ strengths and involving them in decision-making processes. School counselors, principals, teachers, SUCCESS staff, and Bilingual Family Liaisons identify students who are struggling to achieve and/or maintain proficiency, expected growth, or benchmarks in literacy and/or math for the program. 21CCLC will operate for a minimum of 15 hours per week during the school year, providing a daily schedule of differentiated academic support and engaging educational enrichment activities. A daily nutritious snack (and, at times, meals for family night events) will be provided by DMPS in compliance with USDA guidelines. 21CCLC will offer a minimum of 60 hours of programming per month during the school year. Monthly family literacy events will occur at each site, planned around families’ work schedules to the extent possible.

 

Academic Support: Daily academic support sessions will be facilitated by teachers, volunteers, or other qualified district afterschool program staff. DMPS will also contract with Sylvan to provide individual and small group reading and math tutoring in the program, when needed. Academic sessions will include tutoring, small group instruction, homework assistance, and/or other academic curriculum focused on improving academic performance in reading and math. The program will utilize a variety of evidence-based curriculum aligned with district, state, and national standards, including EL Literacy, IM Math, and WRiTE BRAiN (literacy) to improve students’ academic growth and support school-day learning. (Research links can be found in section 4).

 

Educational Enrichment: Daily high-interest educational enrichment activities will complement and encourage academic and social-emotional learning. These activities, provided by DMPS staff or community partners, are based on student and stakeholder input. They will provide safe, interesting, and challenging experiences that help students develop a variety of academic and social-emotional skills. Examples include: arts, fitness, Safety on the Water, book clubs, STEM projects, movie making, cooking, and building positive relationships. Staff will implement Restorative Practices (e.g., Restorative Circles) to build community, develop relationships, and teach students social-emotional skills to respond to problems/conflicts (e.g. healthy expression of feelings, empathy, taking responsibility for their role in conflict and problem-solving).

 

Family Engagement/ Literacy: Eight monthly family engagement/literacy events will be held to encourage positive parent-child interactions and improve school engagement and academic success. Events will be either in-person or virtual and provide fun, hands-on literacy activities for families and “take-a-ways” they can practice at home to build students' literacy skills. Activities align with reading lessons from classroom instruction and with the Iowa Core. During the in-person events, meals will be provided to families. Additionally, through the support of community partners events like mobile food pantries, financial literacy classes and employment assistance will be offered to families. These events along with direct referrals to partner agencies will provide families with needed access to many 


services. The goal is to transform the 21CCLC program into a community center where the whole family is provided support. ELL staff will provide guidance for activities and translation of materials, as needed. Parents will be referred to Des Moines Area Community College adult literacy classes offered at EKD. Resources from DMPS' Full-Service Community School will be promoted to help families gain access to medical, dental, mental health, and food pantry services.

 

3.3 Project goals and objectives, aligned to ESSA Measures of Effectiveness 2.

In addition to the required GPRA measures, DMPS will measure the following:

 

GOAL 1: To provide high-quality, comprehensive out-of-school time academic support activities, aligned with district and state standards, enabling students to improve academically.

 

Outcome Objective 1.1: Students will increase their reading achievement levels from their first measure to their last measure each year:

(Grades 3-5): The percent of students achieving the level of Proficient or Advanced on the literacy section of the Iowa Statewide Assessment of Student Progress (ISASP) will increase year over year by 4%. This assessment is a summative assessment that is administered every spring to students in Grades three through five.

(Grades K-5) The percent of students meeting benchmark on the Formative Assessment System for Teachers (FAST) Reading Assessment will increase by 4% from fall to spring (this assessment is administered three times per year in fall, winter, and spring). FAST tests are used to identify students who need additional support. This assessment is used for diagnostic, screening, and monitoring, and informs instruction both in and out of the classroom.

 

Outcome Objective 1.2: Students will increase their reading achievement levels from their first measure to their last measure each year:

(Grades 3-5): The percent of students achieving the level of Proficient or Advanced on the Iowa Statewide Assessment of Student Progress (ISASP) will increase year over year by 4%. This assessment is a summative assessment that is administered every spring to students in Grades three through five.

(Grades K-5) The percent of students meeting benchmark on the Formative Assessment System for Teachers (FAST) Math Assessments will increase by 4% from fall to spring (this assessment is administered three times per year in fall, winter, and spring). FAST tests are used to identify students who need additional support. This assessment is used for diagnostic, screening, and monitoring, and informs instruction both in and out of the classroom.

 

Activities: tutoring, small-group instruction, homework help, EL Literacy, IM Math, WRiTE BRAiN, Mindworks Resources, English acquisition activities.

 

GOAL 2: To engage students in planning for and participating in high-interest educational enrichment activities, in collaboration with community partners, that promote positive youth development, encourage student engagement, and offer extended learning opportunities.

 

Outcome Objective 2.1: 95% of students will gain new experiences and important life skills by planning and engaging in enrichment programs, measured by satisfaction surveys.

 

Activities: arts and music (arts, music); Robotics (STEM, literacy); Cultural events (diversity); Sports-soccer, swimming (physical literacy); book clubs (literacy); drama and dance (arts); cooking (math, science, nutrition); gardening (math, science, literacy); restorative circles (social-emotional).

 

GOAL 3: To provide a high-quality family literacy program that promotes positive parent-child interactions, improves family engagement and supports students' academic success.

 

Process Objective 3.1: DMPS will provide monthly family literacy events to engage students and families in interactive activities, strengthen relationships, and promote academic growth.

 

Outcome Objective 3.2: 95% of participating families will indicate satisfaction with family literacy activities as measured by semi-annual parent surveys.

 

Activities: Financial boot-camp, monthly family literacy events (experiential activities and games that build students' literacy and math skills; referral to community resources and to programs from ELL Department).

 

GOAL 4: To increase student engagement and attendance in school and promote positive behavior outcomes for students in the program.

 

Outcome Objective 4.1:Students in the program will decrease the number of school days missed by 15.0%.

 

Outcome Objective 4.2:The participating schools will demonstrate a 2% growth in “Sense of Belonging” as measured by the Panorama SEL survey.

 

Activities: art, drama, dance (arts, music); Robotics (STEM, literacy); Cultural events (diversity); Sports-soccer, swimming (physical literacy); book clubs (literacy); cooking (math, science, nutrition); gardening (math, science, literacy); restorative circles (social-emotional).

 


3.4 Evidence of alignment with school day instruction, state and national standards, or CSIP The Project Coordinators will ensure all activities are pedagogically sound through collaborations with curriculum coordinators and aligned with DMPS’ Comprehensive School Improvement Plan (CSIP), the Iowa Core, and school day instruction. Daily contact will occur between daytime teachers and 21CCLC site coordinators to support alignment and communicate students’ needs in order to tailor academic support. The program aligns with CSIP long-term and annual goals for literacy (increasing the percent of students at or above benchmark on FAST in grade 3), serving students at-risk of not progressing in literacy.

 

3.5 Experience providing educational activities and academic support to enhance academic performance, achievement, and positive youth development of students

DMPS has successfully implemented 21CCLC programs, serving five cohorts that consisted of 14 schools during the 2020-21 school year. At that time, over 1000 students were provided 21CCLC in academic classes, clubs, and community partner programs in literacy, art, music, culture, STEM, and physical fitness. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, many of these programs were provided virtually. DMPS staff worked creatively with a variety of partners to keep students engaged through TEAMS. Community partners created imaginative and thoughtful programs, and DMPS staff spent considerable time training students and families to use our virtual platforms and engage with quality out of school time programming in this new and innovative way.

Research Base (5 possible points)  

Local evaluation results show the success of DMPS' 21CCLC programs. In 2020-21, DMPS served over 1,000 students through five 21CCLC cohorts. Combined successes for K-5 regular attendees include: 42% making the benchmark goal in math (MAP Assessment); 42% scoring at benchmark in reading (MAP Assessments). District growth was 38% for math and 42% for reading.

 

The proposed evidence-based activities align with ESSA's Measure of Effectiveness 3., "be based upon evidence-based research that the program or activity will help students meet the challenging state academic standards and any local academic standards." The proposed program will offer a variety of evidence-based academic supports and enrichment activities to improve students' academics (math, literacy) as well as behavior and attendance. The program will utilize evidence-based curriculum aligned with district and state standards (literacy, math, science, and 21st Century Skills) and the district's CSIP. Details can be found at http://www.iowacore.gov/.

 

EL Literacy curriculum is a comprehensive and research-informed curriculum that was developed by former and current teachers. It is used in DMPS classrooms to align to the proposed after school program. It is aligned to college and career readiness standards and guided by eight principles: 1. equity and inclusion, 2. embedded social-emotional learning, 3. knowledge-rich, substantive content, 4. open educational resource, 5. students own their learning, 6. curriculum as professional development, 7. the science of reading, and 8. standards-based. (https://curriculum.eleducation.org/results-and-reviews).

 

Illustrative Math (IM Math) curriculum by Kendal Hunt is well-designed and fully aligned to standards and includes research-driven, instructional foundation. It is used in DMPS classrooms. Students engage in problem-based curriculum with real-world applications. IM is an open educational resource, offering a variety of formats and platforms for learning. The curriculum demonstrates coherence of lesson progression, and it supports culturally responsive pedagogy, including access for English language learners and students who have disabilities. Each unit also includes family-focused support materials. (https://im.kendallhunt.com/k5/teachers/teacher-guide/design-principles.html)

 

WRiTE BRAiN curriculum is research-based, literacy curriculum that focuses on self-expression, writing, storytelling, and 21st Century skills. (https://writebrainbooks.com/education#researchbased).

 

Restorative Practices(e.g. Restorative Circles) are strategies to improve climate and culture, student relationships with peers and teachers, and address staff overuse of exclusionary discipline and address disproportionality. DMPS implements these strategies across the district. Students learn important social-emotional skills, such as: healthy expression of feelings, empathy, taking responsibility for their role in conflict and creating solutions toward resolution. Research has found this to be a promising approach to improve school climate and culture. Several rigorous research trials are in process (Fronius, Persson, Guckenburg, Hurley & Petrosino, 2016).

Management and Sustainability Plan (20 points) 

5.1 Staffing plan to ensure effective recruitment and retention of highly qualified staff, professional development, effective leadership (maintaining alignment with school day instruction), and use of volunteers, especially seniors, to support high-quality programming

 

Management Team: Each school will have a full-time site coordinator (Community School Coordinator) to oversee day-to-day program implementation. This position will collaborate with parents, teachers, staff, and community partners to ensure program effectiveness. S/he will serve as the liaison between the daytime teachers, principals, and 21CCLC staff. These site coordinators will also be responsible for, with support from Project Coordinators and the principal, recruiting qualified staff and supporting alignment of afterschool education with school day instruction. Recruitment will target community programs, other district teachers, and past 21CCLC grant teachers. Recruitment efforts will also target substitute teachers and graduate level education majors with teaching experience, as well as paraprofessionals. Position requirements include a minimum of an AA degree in Human Services or a ParaEducator Certificate or five years of experience in a related field. DMPS will ensure that professionals who provide translation and parent involvement services have a minimum of a high school diploma. All volunteers undergo background checks as part of district policy. The district offers competitive pay and benefits, as well as opportunities for professional growth, creating high retention rates. Each site will be supported by Project Coordinators, Jane Bishop, M.S. (Windsor), and Heidi Brown, M.Ed. (Madison and Oak Park). 


They will provide coordination of the district-wide program and ensure program quality and performance. They will oversee implementation of the following program components: coordination and support of the programs; fiscal management; stakeholder meetings; collaboration with community partners, school staff, and parents; data analysis and program evaluation; continuous improvement; professional development for staff; development of mandatory reports in compliance with federal and state guidelines; and sustainability efforts. Ms. Bishop and Ms. Brown report to Allyson Vukovich, Director of Community in Schools, and they will represent the district and 21CCLC in community collaborations and meetings related to the 21CCLC program. Ms. Vukovich will provide general program leadership and oversight of expenditures, with guidance from Shelly Bosovich, Executive Director of Student and Family Services.

 

Financial Management: All grant finances will be monitored by the DMPS Financial Services Office. DMPS staffs a full-time Internal Auditor and a full-time Grants Accountant to track and monitor grant funds to ensure appropriate use of funds, accurate accounting, financial accountability, and fiscal compliance. Site coordinators will submit purchase requests to be approved by the building principal, Project Coordinators, and Director of Community in Schools.

 

Professional Development: 21CCLC staff will attend a national out-of-school time conference and the Impact Afterschool 2022 conference offered by the Iowa Department of Education and the Iowa Afterschool Alliance. DMPS' 21CCLC staff serve on all of the Afterschool Alliance committees, in compliance with state requirements. 21CCLC staff will attend anti-racist trainings provided by DMPS in support of Board goals. Additional professional development opportunities will be offered throughout the year. All 21CCLC staff will be required to attend at least one hour per month of professional development on a variety of topics, such as: poverty, STEM, Restorative Practices, English Language Learners, inclusivity of students with special needs and disabilities, behavioral health, YPQA training, brain development, literacy, math, equity, physical literacy, and qualitative program evaluation. Staff will attend the Iowa Afterschool Alliance monthly best practice webinars. Site supervisors complete all Department of Human Services required trainings (Mandatory Reporter, CPR/First Aid, Childcare Essentials, etc.). Other courses, open to community partners and parents, will include strengthening parent-child relationships, parents as teachers for their children, life skills, and other applicable topics.

 

Volunteers: DMPS recognizes the benefit and value of utilizing volunteers in an effective, high- quality afterschool program. Volunteers will serve throughout the 21CCLC program to assist with educational enrichment activities. We will draw from the large base of volunteers from DMPS and our community partnerships, including senior citizens, to provide students of the 21CCLC program with additional, value-added support. Additionally, the Project Coordinators will work with high school principals to recruit students from the district's Silver Cord program. The Silver Cord program emphasizes the importance of serving one's own community through volunteerism. It consists of student volunteers who complete 30 hours of community service/ volunteering during each of their high school years. Silver Cord volunteers will assist with homework and during enrichment activities (such as Half-Pints Poetry). Volunteers will enhance academic and enrichment components of the program. All volunteers must pass state background checks prior to working with the students.

 

5.2 Plan for safe student transportation to and from the program, ensuring safe and accessible facilities and services, translation services, serving students with disabilities, and inclusivity

The project will support students through a variety of strategies provided by the 21CCLC program that include, but are not limited to: safe bus transportation to and from programs as needed and field trips (ensuring safe bus stop locations; designated times and zones for parent pick up; structure for parent sign out (students do not leave program alone); digital cameras installed on all buses; child-check system safety alarms); safe building sites (locked building doors, intruder locks for classroom doors, fire alarm systems, video cameras to monitor building exteriors and common spaces); translation of materials into other languages through the DMPS ELL Department; collaboration with local community resources and services (see Section 7); and collaboration with Special Education staff, counseling staff, and SUCCESS staff to tailor programming to meet students' special needs. Translation services will be provided at family literacy events by DMPS ELL staff (Bilingual Family Liaisons), who are multi-lingual, and all staff have at least a high school diploma. ELL staff speaks, reads, and writes in many languages, including but not limited to Arabic, Bosnian, Burmese, Karen, Nepali, Lao, Somali, Spanish, Swahili, and Vietnamese. They provide translation to bridge language gaps between staff and ELL families. DMPS is committed to ensuring an equitable educational experience for all. The district's equity vision is: Des Moines Public Schools serves a community rich in diversity – in every measure of the term – and strives each and every day to support our students and staff so that they thrive, learn. and belong. The district implements an equity analysis framework with a whole child approach to ensure all students' needs are supported. Equity, inclusiveness, data-driven continuous improvement, and evidence-based decision-making are foundational strategies discussed in depth at: https://www.dmschools.org/departments/administration/equity-at-dmps/.

 

It is DMPS' policy not to discriminate based on race, color, national origin, gender, disability, religion, creed, age, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, and socio-economic status in educational programs and employment practices. There is a grievance procedure for processing complaints of discrimination. If you have questions or a grievance related to this policy please contact Carol Wynn-Green, Equity and Inclusion Program Manager, 2100 Fleur Drive, 515-242-7709, carol.wynngreen@dmschools.org. DMPS policies related to equity and inclusion are included in the 400 series of school district policies, found at: https://www.dmschools.org/departments/administration/policies-and-procedures/series-400/. Additionally, Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination against persons with a disability in any program receiving federal financial assistance. Des Moines Schools is committed to providing a full continuum of quality educational services for students with disabilities in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities of Act (IDEA). 21CCLC staff collaborate with the district’s Student and Family Services team, as well as with parents, to ensure students in the program are provided necessary accommodations and/or services related to inclusivity and accessibility of programming. 21CCLC programming is held on-site at school buildings that meet the standards for the Americans with Disabilities Act.

 



5.3 The development and engagement of stakeholder advisory group that meets regularly and organizational or program leadership structure

To provide a system of continuous improvement, the 21CCLC Project Coordinators will lead development of the 21CCLC Leadership Team that consists of the Project Coordinators, principals, site coordinators, the external evaluator, parents, students, and community partners. This Leadership Team will serve as an advisory council and meet monthly for 1 hour via a virtual meeting platform. The team will discuss feedback from parents and students (from surveys and discussions), partnership opportunities, and program outcomes (progress, barriers, needed modifications) to guide program design and implementation. This provides a continuous feedback loop for ongoing program improvement. Organizational program leadership structure includes administrative oversight by the Executive Director of Student and Family Services and the Director of Community in Schools, as well as program management and coordination by the Project Coordinators, who oversees the Community School Coordinators (who serve as full-time 21CCLC site coordinators). These site coordinators oversee day to day programming (staffing, community partners, program implementation) to ensure program success. Please see Section 5.1 Management Team for more details on staffing.

 

5.4 Plan for continuous program improvement and sustainability after 21CCLC funding ends; how resources will be combined or coordinated for the most effective use of public funds

The Project Coordinators will work with DMPS administrators and the 21CCLC Leadership Team to develop a sustainability plan. Strategies include garnering broad-based community support via increased visibility and promotion, utilization of existing resources, building new community partnerships, and creating new revenue streams.

 

External: To sustain programming beyond the life of the grant, DMPS will build community partnerships and continue to utilize internal partnerships. The Project Coordinators are part of Afterschool Alliance Out of School time network that works to increase awareness and create relationships and site coordinators will work in the community to find local partnerships that will benefit their schools. The district employs a Director of Community in Schools, Allyson Vukovich, who continues to build relationships, bringing community organizations into schools to provide a vast array of services, programming, and funding (e.g., United Way of Central Iowa) to increase support for our successful programs. The district employs a Community Partnership Coordinator, Vanessa Howell, who assists partners with the MOU process and data sharing to sustain collaborative relationships that are built. Data sharing enables continual collaboration on district and partner initiatives, evaluating the impact of programming on our students, modifying programs as needed, and thereby increasing the effectiveness of our work. This continuous feedback loop creates strong partnerships. The district's Community School Coordinators will serve as full-time site coordinators for the grant and beyond, an in-kind contribution from DMPS to offset program costs.

 

Internal: Several internal programs that work with 21CCLC will continue beyond grant funds, such as the Silver Cord program (high school volunteers provide homework help, other enrichment assistance) and Half-Pints Poetry (enrichment). A partnership with the district’s Metro Kids afterschool childcare program will provide an avenue to sustain programming after funding ends. Discussions with the Iowa Department of Human Services (DHS), Iowa Department of Education (DE), and district administrators have taken place regarding how the childcare program and an academic support/enrichment program can work together to meet the needs of the students. Community School Coordinators promote state childcare assistance to families to increase accessibility to Metro Kids, reducing financial barriers, and allowing students in Metro Kids to leave that program to attend 21CCLC programming (approved by DHS and the DE 21CCLC Program Consultant). DMPS will invest in capacity building through one-time purchases of technology, equipment, and materials that will span beyond the life of grant funds. For example, computer software programs for ELL, literacy, and math, and durable equipment purchases for physical literacy activities will sustain after funds are gone, providing a high return on investment.

 

Current sustainability at other sites: In current district 21CCLC cohorts that operate at decreased funding levels, community partners have committed funding toward programs (shown by the chart below). For example, the John R. Grubb YMCA has committed to providing ongoing programming, as funding permits. ASAP provides transportation for students and continues to seek grants and other funding to support the partnership beyond the grant cycle. Local grants have provided funding (e.g., John Deere First Lego League STEM grants have been secured for sites that no longer have 21CCLC funding) and Reach for the Stars Grant from Child Care Resource & Referral has provided program materials.

The district will seek grants and contributions focused on afterschool programs. Contributions from other partners toward sustainability of the program include:

GRUBB YMCA: Contributed Starfish Academy and staff at 2 sites, an in-kind value of $160,000.

BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB: Contributed summer programming opportunities and staff for 8 sites, an in-kind value of $6,000.

HALF-PINTS POETRY: Contributed programming and administration, family events, curriculum, and staff at 15 sites, an in-kind value of $26,000.

DMARC: Contributed mobile food pantries and staff at 4 sites, an in-kind value of $83,736.

EKD: Contributed program materials and training at 15 sites, an in-kind value of $1,000.

GIRL SCOUTS: Contributed program materials, fees, and staff at 15 sites, an in-kind value of $5,000.

GIRLS ON THE RUN: Contributed curriculum, race participation at 6 sites, an in-kind value of $1,200.

ISU EXTENSION-POLK COUNTY: Contributed curriculum, materials, and staff at 16 sites, an in-kind value of $5,000.

Communication Plan (5 possible points)

Partnerships (10 possible points) 

7.1 Describe existing partnerships and the partners’ roles in programming and/or sustainability. Distinguish between a partnership and a contractor. Provide MOUs.

Please find MOU's (Community Partnership Agreements) and letters of support from community partners attached to this grant.

 

Afterschool Arts Program: (External MOU Partner, in-kind contributions)

ASAP’s mission is to affirm young people as persons of value, nurture their skill and talent in the arts, help them realize their artistic gifts, and broaden their awareness of the varieties of artistic expression. ASAP has been working closely with Des Moines Public Schools since its founding in 2007, connecting students with quality enrichment programming in a wide variety of artistic mediums, led by experienced teaching artists. Contributions are valued at $2,250.

 

Build Lincoln Higher: (External MOU Partner, in-kind contributions)

Build Lincoln Higher has been supporting Lincoln High School students and their activities since 1944. In the last three years, in collaboration with 21CCLC programming in Des Moines Public Schools, BLH has expanded their reach to provide out of school time programs for elementary schools in DMPS offering programs such as storytelling, hip hop dance, basketball, football and soccer. Contributions are valued at $4,500.

 

Primary Health Care: (External MOU Partner, in-kind contributions).

DMPS is home to two school-based health clinics staffed by Primary Health Care, a community partner organization. These clinics provide students with vaccinations, health and sports physicals, acute care, reproductive healthcare, and well-baby checks for children of pregnant/ parenting students. In addition to the quality health care students receive, Primary Health Care staff members assist families in obtaining insurance when possible, establishing a health home, confirming if vaccinations are up to date and guiding patients to other vital community health resources. Contributions are valued at $3,600.

 

ISU Extension and Outreach-Polk County: (External MOU Partner, in-kind contributions). Polk County Extension provides high-quality food, nutrition, and health programs to school-age students. Polk County Extension offers free 4-H Clubs, including staff and materials to afterschool programs. The programs provided by Polk County Extension help students to utilize their; head, hands, heart, health to better serve the community. The in-kind donation of club fees and support staff is valued at $1,800.

 

YMCA: (External MOU Partner, in-kind contributions). (OP/Mad– Grubb; Windsor–Walnut Creek). The YMCA is an existing partner for Girls on the Run Club afterschool program. They also offer water safety course at no-cost (Safety on the Water). The YMCA provides transportation for students to their facility to provide an on-site safety around water course. This program is designed to instruct students, especially ELL students, on basic water safety practices. Contributions are valued at $13,000.

 

Evelyn K. Davis Center for Working Families: (External MOU Partner, in-kind contributions). EKD supports working families to become self-sufficient. EKD in partnership with DMPS provides adult literacy and parent programming. DMPS staff provide parents with information and referrals for Hi-Set, English Language Learning, and a variety of other adult learning programs, including Careers in the City (partnership with DMACC’s Workforce Training Academy, which focuses on career assessment and short-term workforce training programs for jobs that are competitive in today’s marketplace). DMPS will also partner with EKD for family-focused programming. Programming will occur on-site at the three elementary schools to ensure families have access to the offerings, offering financial literacy boot camps for the entire family, focused on achieving financial self-sufficiency. Students will have the opportunity to practice math skills, and families will gain access to a free financial coach to help them achieve their goals. EKD will support families with free Financial Literacy Boot Camps and financial coaching. Contributions are valued at $1,000.

 

Half Pints Poetry/Urban Leadership 101- Internship: (Internal Partner; in-kind by DMPS). As part of Central Campus Urban Leadership 101, high school students complete a 12-week internship that provides elementary students with opportunities to create poetry and build leadership skills. At the end of the internship, the high school students are welcomed to apply for a paid position with 21CCLC. Staffing is an in-kind contribution from the district.

 

Silver Cord: (Internal Partner; in-kind by DMPS). The DMPS Silver Cord program emphasizes the importance of students serving their community through volunteerism. It consists of student volunteers who complete 30 hours of community service/volunteering during each of their high school years. Silver Cord volunteers will read to students, assist with homework, and assist during enrichment activities (such as Half-Pints Poetry).

 

Full-Service Community School: (Internal/External Partners; in-kind by DMPS). DMPS aims to meet the needs of the whole child through on-site dental services (Dental Connections), medical services (Primary Health Care), and mental health (Orchard Place; MOSAIC). Additionally, DMPS provides vision exams and glasses (Vision to Learn) and dental check-ups (Smile Squad), these services are provided at 21CCLC schools at no-cost to the families. Families will be referred to these or additional services as needed.

 

Others: Families and students will identify other potential enrichment programs, such as: Iowa Public Television (free curriculum: Electric Company and Extended Learning Program; professional development on literacy, Math Mentorship); Agricultural companies based in Des Moines. DMPS has partnerships with over sixty community agencies qualified to work with DMPS 21CCLC programs.

 





7.2 Describe plan for meaningfully engaging partners over lifetime of grant, recruiting new partners, and maintaining relationships. Develop and maintain a Sustainability Plan.

With input from stakeholders and the Leadership Team to identify prospective community partners on an ongoing basis, the Project Coordinators and site coordinators will recruit new partnerships throughout the life of the grant (for programming, volunteer opportunities, field trips, career fairs, grant funding, etc.). New External Partners may include corporations (i.e. Wells Fargo, Casey’s), Public/Private Universities (Grandview), and food sourcing groups (Eat Greater Des Moines). We will aim to maintain strong relationships with external partners that include: STEM-focused programs (Kemin) arts-focused programs (DSM Arts Center); Child Care Resource and Referral (program support and grant opportunities); John Deere (a past grant partner and currently providing sustainable programs to three former 21CCLC schools) through various grant opportunities related to STEM, etc.; and financial literacy programs (DMACC). school site’s current business partners will be considered for partnerships. The Project Coordinators will also serve on community boards and committees to recruit partners. Other recruitment efforts will be done through existing partnerships, social media and RFIs. To retain partners, DMPS will foster open communication and a continuous feedback loop through ongoing communication to ensure partners’ needs are met. Partners will attend monthly Community Conversations and Leadership Team meetings to share feedback about the program to modify it for the benefit of all. The sustainability plan includes the following strategies: garnering broad-based community support via increased visibility and promotion, utilization of existing resources, building new partnerships, and creating new revenue streams. Please refer to section 5.4 where this plan is discussed in detail.

Evaluation (10 possible points) 

8.1 Evidence an experienced evaluator will conduct a comprehensive, rigorous evaluation of program (local level and with the state), intent to provide requested information, attend local trainings and use forms provided by the Department. Provide evaluator contact information.

DMPS will hire external evaluators to conduct a rigorous, comprehensive evaluation of qualitative and quantitative measures to evaluate the effectiveness of the 21CCLC program on student achievement and engagement. The evaluation will meet state requirements and include the two components of a high-quality evaluation from the US DOE (21CCLC GPRA Indicators and Measures and aligned with ESSA's Measures of Effectiveness). The assessment data will guide program design, informing program improvements. DMPS will contract with a highly qualified external evaluator through FDSG Consulting, Jill Padgett. She will be contracted to collect, analyze, and report on all formative and summative assessment data (FAST, MAP, state assessment) and engagement data (attendance, behavior). She will also collect, analyze, and report on qualitative data (parent and student survey data). Quantitative data will be housed in DMPS' Infinite Campus database, while qualitative data will be tracked electronically. The frequency of collection, analysis, and reporting is detailed in Section 8.2. Based on changing student needs and interests, the program plan will be adjusted to fulfill program objectives. The summative evaluation report will include annual measures that provide external criteria of success. Using external measures in concert with internal measures, evaluation results will be reviewed by the Project Coordinators and Leadership Team for areas of needed modification to strengthen the program. A semi-annual report will be reviewed by stakeholders before major changes are implemented. Ms. Padgett is a Licensed Master Social Worker (LMSW) in the state of Iowa with fifteen years of experience developing, leading, and evaluating programs that eliminate disparities and promote positive outcomes among youth, families, and communities. Ms. Padgett can be reached by phone at 334-303-2384 or at 502 Deer Ridge Dr. NW, Bondurant, IA 50035. The daily rate for evaluation is $150. Total evaluation costs are $3,000 per year. Ms. Padgett will work closely with Jocelyn Sturgis, Program Evaluator for DMPS to collect and analyze data. Ms. Sturgis will provide approximately 10 hours of her time to the project ($60.39/hour x 8 hours/day = $483.12/day x 10 days = $4,831.20, a contribution from DMPS). She is an experienced evaluator with years of experience in program evaluation. Her phone number is 515-242-7838. Community Youth Concepts will provide external evaluation using certified Youth Development Program Quality Assessment Tool (YPQA) evaluators to ensure program effectiveness and compliance with IDE requested data and information. The YPQA will be conducted semi-annually and guides program design. It measures the quality indicators of 1) safe environments, 2) supportive environments, 3) positive interactions, 4) active student engagement, 5) youth-centered policies and practices, 6) high expectations of students and staff, and 7) access to programs. This tool will yield valuable information for ongoing program refinement, accountability to stakeholders, and support for long-term sustainability. DMPS will comply with all requirements of the Iowa Department of Education and US Department of Education (APR reporting) for requested data, reporting, and monitoring of the program.

 

8.2 Evidence how results will improve, strengthen the program and build community support; align with goals, objectives, and activities; plan to make results easily understood to public.

The timeline information below shows completion of evaluation activities. Results are analyzed by the external evaluator and Leadership Team to make necessary modifications. Reports will be available to the public annually via DMPS' 21CCLC website (www.21cclcdm.com). Reader-friendly reports for the public will be disseminated according to the Communication Plan.

 

GOAL 1: To provide high-quality, comprehensive out-of-school time academic support activities, aligned with district and state standards, enabling students to improve academically.

OBJECTIVES: 1.1 and 1.2.

ACTIVITIES: Tutoring, small group instruction, homework help, Sylvan (academics; robotics/STEM), EL Literacy, IM Math, WRiTE BRAiN

INDICATORS AND TIMELINE FOR DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

  • Number of sessions provided (monthly)

  • Program and attendance reports (monthly)

  • SEL data (yearly)

  • Formative assessment data (2-3 times/year)

  • Leadership Team meetings (monthly)

  • YPQA results (2 times/year)


GOAL 2: To engage students in planning for and participating in high-interest educational enrichment activities, in collaboration with community partners, that promote positive youth development, encourage student engagement, and offer extended learning opportunities.

OBJECTIVES: 2.1

ACTIVITIES: Variety of arts, music, STEM, Restorative Practices, Restorative Circles, gardening, book clubs, cooking, cultural classes, fitness/sports, drama, etc.

INDICATORS AND TIMELINE FOR DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

  • MOUs with Partners (ongoing; yearly)

  • Leadership Team meetings (monthly)

  • Number of sessions provided (monthly)

  • YPQA results (2 times/year)

  • Student and Parent surveys (annually)
    Program and attendance reports (monthly)

GOAL 3: To provide a high-quality family literacy program that promotes positive parent-child interactions, improves family engagement and supports students' academic success.

OBJECTIVES: 3.1 and 3.2

ACTIVITIES: Family events; resource referral

INDICATORS AND TIMELINE FOR DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

  • Number of events (quarterly)

  • Number attending (quarterly)

  • Parent surveys (quarterly)

GOAL 4: To increase student engagement and attendance in school and promote positive behavior outcomes for students in the program.

OBJECTIVES: 4.1 and 4.2

ACTIVITIES: Variety of arts, music, STEM, restorative circles, gardening, book clubs, cooking, cultural classes, sports, etc.

INDICATORS AND TIMELINE FOR DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

  • Program and school attendance reports (monthly)

  • SEL data (yearly)

  • Leadership Team meetings (monthly)

  • YPQA Results (2 times/year)

  • REPORTING: All indicators will be reported annually, as required. Indicators will also be reported monthly to the Leadership Team to gauge results and needed improvements.


The DMPS 21CCLC program is a leader among state grantees state due to its strong design, outstanding partnerships, effective implementation, and positive impact on student achievement. DMPS has implemented 21CCLC since 2007, serving over 2,000 students yearly. Last year, regular attendees made benchmarks that exceeded district growth in both reading and math, 53% and 49% respectively; district benchmarks were 49% math and 45% reading growth.

Budget Narrative (10 possible points) 

9.1 Detailed justification for each line item from Form D2, how expenditures are necessary, reasonable, align with activities, include contributions from others, documents sustainability.

Funding Formula: 249 students x 160 days x $7.50/day = $298,800 across three sites per year.

Per site: $99,600 (33.33%) serving 83 students. (Madison, Oak Park, and Windsor)

Grant-funded and in-kind expenditures are described in detail below, broken down by program (Student Program (SP) and Family Literacy Program (FL)), and by site.

 

GRANT FUNDED EXPENDITURES ($298,800/yr):

PROGRAM: TOTAL: $256,793.53/yr ($85,597.84/site)

PERSONNEL: SP: Teachers provide academic support/enrichment: $35.13/hr x 5 hrs/wk x 32 wks = $8,911.36 x 15 teachers = $84,312/yr (5 teachers per site = $28,104/site. Community School Coordinators provide site supervision 15% of time: $13,166.71/site x 3 sites = $ 39,500.13/yr. Project Coordinators’ time (20% of Heidi Brown’s time; 10% of Jane Bishop’s time) = $39,531.40. TOTAL: $163,343.53/yr ($54,447.84/site).

CONTRACTED SERVICES: SP: $19,300.00 per site toward partner costs for student programming. TOTAL: $57,900/yr.

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES: SP: $9,600/site = $28,800. FL: $2,250/site = $6,750/yr. TOTAL: $32,550/yr ($10,850/site).

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: TOTAL: $18,915.60 ($6,305.20/site): Funds will provide professional development to staff, teachers, and community partners provided by staff and/or consultants. Project Coordinator and staff will participate in national conferences. PD for 21CCLC staff includes at least 1 hr/month on a variety of topics (YPQA Training, social-emotional health, Cultural Diversity, etc.).

PERSONNEL: SP: PD will occur 1 hr/month ($35.13/hr x 5 staff/site x 8 months = $1,405.20/site = TOTAL: $4,215.60/yr.

CONTRACTED SERVICES: SP: Community Youth Concepts provides YPQA training at $900.00/site x 3 sites = $2,700.00 x 2 trainings per year = TOTAL: $5,400.00/yr ($600.00/site).

OTHER: SP/FL: One staff/site attend national out-of-school-time conference: $3,000.00/person x 3 sites = $9,000.00/yr. One staff/site attend Impact Afterschool Conference: $100/staff x 3 staff =$300.00/yr. TOTAL: $9,300.00/yr ($3,100.00/site).

 



STUDENT ACCESS: TOTAL: $3,000.00/yr. ($1,000/site).

TRANSPORTATION: Funds for transportation (buses, Kids-Zoom, etc.) to and from program as needed (community recreational and cultural programs, field trips, family events) SP: $2,100.00/yr ($700.00/site). FL: $900.00/yr ($300.00/site). TOTAL: $3,000.00/yr.

 

EVALUATION: TOTAL: $3,000.00/yr ($1,000/site). Contract with FDSG Consulting = $3,000.00.

 

OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE: TOTAL: $17,090.87/yr. ($5,696.96/site). OTHER: Project Coordinators time’ = $6,847.12 ($2,282.37/site). INDIRECT: 3.55% (restricted rate) of total direct costs = $10,243.75 ($3,414.58/site).

 

IN-KIND CONTRIBUTIONS (TOTAL: $120,401.80/yr):

PROGRAM: (TOTAL $82,107.80/yr).

PERSONNEL: SP: Des Moines Public Schools will contribute the following to the program: Executive Director of Student and Family Services: 1% of time = $2,266.94/yr ($755.65/site). Director of Community in Schools: 2% of time = $3218.94/yr ($1072.98/site). Community Partnership Coordinator: 1% of time = $1104.94/yr ($368.31/site). Bilingual Family Liaison Specialist: 1% of time = $995.57/yr ($497.78/site). Community School Coordinators: 85% of time = $74,611.36/yr ($24,870.45/site). Total: $82,107.80 ($27,369.30/site). FL: Family Literacy events personnel: $500.00/event x 8 events = $4,000.00/site x 3 sites = Total: $12,000.00/yr. Total: $94,107.80/yr ($31369.27 /site) (DMPS state and local funds).

CONTRACTED SERVICES: ASAP, Inc.: $2,250/year, full partner); Build Lincoln Higher: $4,500/year, full partner); Primary Health Care ($3,600/year; full partner); YMCA ($13,000/yr; full partner); EKD ($1,000/year; full partner). Total: $24,350.00 ($8,116.67/site) (Partner contributions).

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES: Iowa State Extension for materials and staff ($1,800/yr, full partner); Total: $1,800/yr ($600/site).

AFTERSCHOOL SNACKS: $1.10/snack x 11,040 snacks ($4,048.00/site). Total: $12,144.00/yr(DMPS Enterprise Fund).

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: (TOTAL $3,842.68/yr; 1,280.89/site).

PERSONNEL: Social-emotional learning trainings (e.g., Restorative Practices) trainer time: 2% of Project Coordinator’s time (non-grant funded time) = $2,578.00/yr. DHS-approved trainings 6 hrs x $35.13/hr x 6 staff = $1,264.68/yr ($421.56/site). Total Personnel: $3,842.68/year ($1,280.89/site) (DMPS state and local funds).

 

STUDENT ACCESS: (TOTAL $1,500.00/yr). Bilingual Family Liaison translation services = $500.00/site x 3 sites. TOTAL: $1,500/yr ($1,200.00 student program; $300.00 family literacy). (DMPS state and local funds).

 

EVALUATION: (TOTAL $4,831.20/yr). To provide data collection, evaluation, and required reporting, with reports disseminated to staff, parents, advisory committee, DMPS administration, the community, and the Iowa Department of Education. Program evaluation costs are provided in-kind from DMPS: $60.39/hour x 8 hours/day = $483.12/day x 10 days = $4,831.20. TOTAL: ($1,610.40/site) (DMPS state and local funds). TOTAL: $4,831.20/yr.

 

9.2 Describe how the program seeks to supplement, rather than supplant, current funding.

DMPS will use funds from 21CCCLC to supplement, not supplant existing services and funds. DMPS employs a full-time Grants Accountant and Internal Auditor who ensure compliance. Funds will create and expand afterschool programming for children and families. Funds will provide academic support and enrichment activities, personnel, family literacy programming, community partner services for enrichment activities, and program materials that could not otherwise be provided without grant funds. Form G documents our prior work and sustainability from the previous five years of federal funding, showing that we are not supplanting.

Supplemental Materials

View Document

Before School (BS) Site Operations

Estimated Start Date:

December 2, 2021

Estimated End Date:

December 2, 2021

Total Number of Service Days:

NA

Total hours of Before School services per typical week:

NA

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Saturday

NA

NA

NA

After School (AS) Site Operations

Total hours of After School services per typical week:

16 hours 15 minutes

Total Number of Service Days:

160

Estimated End Date:

May 26, 2023

Estimated Start Date:

September 12, 2022

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

2:45pm

2:45pm

2:45pm

2:45pm

2:45pm

5:30pm

5:30pm

5:30pm

5:30pm

5:30pm

3h15m

3h15m

3h15m

3h15m

3h15m

Saturday

0

0

0

Summer (SUM) Site Operations

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Saturday

NA

NA

NA

Estimated Start Date:

December 2, 2021

Estimated End Date:

December 2, 2021

Total Number of Service Days:

NA

Total hours of Summer services per typical week:

NA

Adult Family Member Services

All 21CCLC programs are required to host a minimum of four family-centered events each year. A general rule of thumb is one per quarter. Examples of events include back-to-school celebrations, literacy nights, family game nights, recreational events, guest speakers, and so on. 

Describe Frequency, Duration, and Dosage:

Monthly (8 total) family nights are held per year at each participating school.

Estimated Total Number of Adult Family Members Served:*
Total Number of Family Events*
School Name

Madison Elementary

8

200

Oak Park Elementary

8

200

Windsor Elementary

8

200

Form D1: 21CCLC Application Funding Request Summary
 

21CCLC TOTAL FUNDING REQUEST 

(Before and/or After School and Summer Program Funds) 

3

Number of program sites included in this application:

249

Total number of students being served (all sites for one year):

$298,800

Total first-year funding request (all sites):

Total three-year funding request (all sites):

$896,400

FUNDING FOR EACH SITE INCLUDED IN THIS APPLICATION 

NOTE: A program site may serve students from many schools. For example, a location that serves students from three (3) different schools would be considered one Program Site. 

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

Madison Elementary

$99,600

$99,600

$99,600

$298,800

83

Oak Park Elementary

$99,600

$99,600

$99,600

$298,800

83

Windsor Elementary

$99,600

$99,600

$99,600

$298,800

83

School Year

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Summer School

Form D4: Applicant Agency’s Fiscal Resource Information 

It is recommended that each applicant, including school districts, public entities, or government agencies, possess sufficient fiscal resources in order to start up and operate the program being requested for a period of up to three months. Please indicate if you are a public entity or a private/non-profit by checking the appropriate box below and then use the text box at the bottom of the page to answer the questions regarding fiscal resources for start-up costs and operational costs. 

Public Entity

In the textbox below, please describe your funding sources that can be used to start up and operate the program for up to three months. For example, public entities should include their budget line item number, account numbers, or any other applicable references. Private organizations should describe cash, lines of credit, emergency loans, etc. Fiscal resource information should be specific (e.g., bank or lender names; name of the holder of the account).

 

* Note: If you do not have the financial resources available equal to the amount of funding you are requesting, you do not have the financial capacity for this project. Agencies that do not have adequate fiscal resources on hand are eligible to participate in the application process. However, the applicant must describe in this section the agency’s plan to secure the necessary fiscal resources for this program application. 

We will use General Funds to start up and operate the program for up to three months, if needed.

To view Forms D2 and D3, click the "View Document" buttons below. PDF versions are included at the end of this document but the information may not be split into multiple pages. 
 

Basic Service Components

If location for the program is different from the school where children attend, list both below:

Oak Park Elementary

School or Site/Building Name:

Madison Elementary

School or Site/Building Name:

Windsor Elementary

School or Site/Building Name:
Do you plan to provide any of the following to meet the nutrition/food access needs of students?

Backpack program (https://www.foodbankiowa.org/backpack), Snack (required by federal statute)

Do you plan to follow best practices?

Yes, we will provide a free program to at-risk students in poverty as outlined in the guidance and consistent with the priority description in the application. All students on FRPL will attend for free. Best Practice is that applicants serve a minimum of 50% of FRPL children at each school in the application to receive the bonus points.

 
 

Site Information 

2022-2025 Site Profile 

Des Moines Independent Community School District

School/Agency Name:

School Name
(can apply for up to 3 sites) 
School-Wide Information 

Grades Served by School 

Total Enrollment 

Free and Reduced Lunch Rate 

# Targeted Students 

Grades Served by Program 

BS

AS

SUM

Target Schools

Madison Elementary

K-5

255

85.88%

K-5

0

83

0

Oak Park Elementary

K-5

326

88.65%

K-5

0

83

0

Windsor Elementary

K-5

284

60.92%

K-5

0

83

0

Total:

0

249

0