Council Bluffs Community School District

Application Information

Applicant Serving as Fiscal Agent (Applicant Agency):

Council Bluffs Community School District

County:

Pottawattamie

Amount Requested:

$290,000

Director of Agency:

Contact Name:

Vickie Murillo

Agency Name:

Council Bluffs Community School District

Phone:

712-328-6446

Fax:

712-328-6548

Email:

Grant Contact/Project Director: 

These fields will appear blank of the previous question was answered "Yes" and the Grant Contact/Project Director is the same as the Director of Agency. 

Contact Name:

Nikki Clausen

Agency Name:

Council Bluffs Community School District

Phone:

712-328-6446

Fax:

712-328-6548

Email:

DUNS Number:

0802174330000

Is the Grant Contact/Project Director the same contact as the Director of Agency?

No

300 W. Broadway, Suite 1600, Council Bluffs 51503

Address:

300 W. Broadway, Suite 1600, Council Bluffs 51503

Address:

Data Collection and Evaluation Contact:

Contact Name:

Dr. Sherry Huffman

Phone:

712-366-0503

Fax:

Email:

103 Central, Suite 301, Glenwood 51534

Address:

Fiscal Contact:

Contact Name:

Dean Wilson

Phone:

712-328-6446

Fax:

712-328-6548

Email:

300 W. Broadway, Suite 1600, Council Bluffs 51503

Address:

Iowa 21st Century Community Learning Centers Request for Applications FY22

Past Grantee Supplemental Application Information

Have you ever been in non-compliance (received a letter notice from Iowa Department of Education stating non-compliance) with 21CCLC rules and regulations in the past three years? 

No

Did you meet your attendance goals for the past two years? (21CCLC funded sites are required to meet their attendance goals at a rate of 70% in year one and 80% by year three)

No

Please provide your enrollment numbers for the last three years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

Carter Lake
2018-19: 118
2019-20: 104
2020-21: 74

Roosevelt:
2018-19: 173
2019-20: 130
2020-21: 164

Please provide your average daily attendance for the last threes years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

Carter Lake
2018-19: 38
2019-20: 29
2020-21: 22

Roosevelt:
2018-19: 69
2019-20: 54
2020-21: 57

Did you meet your academic goals for the past two years?

Yes

How many of your local evaluation goals did you meet over the past two years?

75%

How much have office referrals been reduced over the past five years of your grant?

Over 50%

After 5 years, how many community partners for sustainability have been recruited?

50+

Have you exceeded the snack requirement, by providing a full meal?

No

Have you participated in required committee work in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

Have you attended required Professional Development in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

How many parent engagement meetings did you have in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

2

How many field trips did you provide in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

0

Have you provided children with the required snack?

Yes

Are you charging program fees to families?

No

Form Documentation

Legal Status of Applicant
Request for Competitive Priority
Minority Impact Statement
Private School Consultation Meeting Log
Sustainability Plan
Past Grantee Sustainability Form (if applicable)
Community Partner Official Notice
View Document
Assurances & Agreements Required of All Applicants
Collaborative Signatures

MOUs

Applicants were required to upload at least 5 and up to 10 MOUs. Not all buttons below will have an MOU attached. 

MOU Upload 1
MOU Upload 2
 MOU Upload 3
MOU Upload 4
MOU Upload 5
MOU Upload 6
MOU Upload 7
MOU Upload 8
MOU Upload 9
MOU Upload 10

Proposal Narrative

Abstract (Not scored)

The number of students served:

230

The total amount requested per year:

290000

The total amount per student:

1260.87

Competitive Priority

The Council Bluffs Community School District (CBCSD) proposes to expand and enhance its existing 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21stCCLC) programming at two elementary schools and to revitalize programming at one middle school within the district.


The proposed programming will meet competitive priority #6, “propose to serve middle and/or high school aged youth with Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs with evidence of a partnership agreement with a local college or university.” As part of this project, CBCSD will partner with Iowa Western Community College’s (IWCC) Career Experiences program to deliver CTE programming to students at Gerald W. Kirn Middle School. The attached memorandum of understanding (MOU) outlines the proposed activities, which include IWCC providing on-site career-related simulations for middle school students, as well as supplying brochures, handouts, and program materials at events.


Note that while none of the schools is currently in the “Needs Improvement” category on Iowa School Performance Profiles, both Carter Lake Elementary and Kirn Middle School are in year two of “Targeted” status. Kirn has advanced to the “Commendable” designation, while Carter Lake is considered “Acceptable.”

 

Student Needs Assessment

The CBCSD 21st CCLC project will serve students at Carter Lake Elementary (CLE), Roosevelt Elementary (RVE), and Gerald W. Kirn Middle (GWK). All three schools are located within the CBCSD in western Iowa’s Pottawattamie County. These schools include two existing 21st CCLC program sites (CLE and RVE) and one revitalized prior site (GWK). Each of these schools has higher-than-state-average percentages of students with disabilities, students identified as English Language Learners, and students from low-income households. Over 70% of students who attend the proposed schools qualify for the free/reduced lunch program (FRL), indicating that they reside in low-income households. Students in these subgroups are more likely to face significant academic achievement gaps and can benefit from the targeted academic assistance and extracurricular enrichment offered by 21st CCLC programs.

 

Project

This project proposes to operate before- and after-school programs, as well as summer programs, at the three proposed sites. CBCSD will also focus on providing new family engagement events and opportunities for adult literacy programs through partners such as Iowa Western Community College, which will also offer CTE programming at GWK. At each of the elementary sites, CBCSD will target 70 students as regular attendees (students who attend 30 or more days of programming). CLE anticipates 100 total participants (students who attend 1 to 29 days of programming), and RVE anticipates 125 total participants. At the middle school level, CBCSD will target 90 regular attendees and 200 total participants. During the school year, CBCSD aims to provide more than 60 hours per month of before and after school programs at each site, plus family engagement events during the school year. The district will also provide at least 30 days of summer programming for participants at all three sites.

 

Research Base

The proposed project is based on evidence-oriented methodologies in reading and math interventions, student learning, cognitive behavior theory, assessment, and out-of-school program framework. The development of the “whole child” will be supported and fostered through reading and mathematics interventions and strategies aligned with the school-day curriculum (cognitive), physical activity before and after the school day (physical), and methodologies such as Zones of Regulations (social-emotional).

 

Management and Sustainability Plan

Staffing strategies for this project are based on successful practices employed at other CBCSD 21st CCLC sites and include a student-to-staff ratio of 15:1. 21st CCLC leadership includes representation from the office of the superintendent, the chief of teaching and learning, and the chief of student and family services for the district, as well as an existing full-time 21st CCLC program director and assistant director. Each program site will have a site facilitator, program coordinator, and stakeholder advisory group to provide local guidance and oversight. 21st CCLC staff and advisors pursue program sustainability through continuous program improvement and the incremental increase in community partners providing in-kind support. These partnerships facilitate experiences that typically would not be available to elementary and middle school students, staff, and families and increase the overall program impact.

 

Communication Plan

Staff will use various outreach strategies to share program information and evaluation details with stakeholders, including the broader community, district, students, parents, and community partners. All forms of communication to students and families, such as paper materials, emails, and phone call recordings, will be provided in Spanish and English. In addition to the district and site-specific websites and social media pages, staff maintain a 21stCCLC program website on which program information and evaluation results will be posted.



 

Partnerships

A growing number of community organizations provide services and opportunities to CBCSD youth involved in 21st CCLC programs. The network of partnerships reaches deep throughout the Council Bluffs area to address and alleviate the needs of students and families across the district. Over 100 community partnerships of all levels have been developed in the ten current CBCSD 21st CCLC programs since the 2014-15 school year, when CBCSD first began offering these programs. CBCSD’s vision is to grow this network even further with in-depth involvement with partners like Iowa Western Community College, Vex Robotics, and purposefully guided advisory groups to steer outreach among partners.

 

Evaluation

The project will use an extensive and detailed evaluation plan for the fifth consecutive year with Dr. Sherry Huffman as the evaluator, providing comprehensive external evaluation services and consultation. This includes student data collection and analysis (academic, attendance, behavior, survey results, etc.), development of local and state/federal reports, attending local evaluator training sessions, and conducting site visits for observations to gain a clear perspective of the programs beyond the data, which will provide more effective recommendations.

 

Budget Narrative

CBCSD requests a total of $290,000 per year to serve 230 students as regular attendees (425 total participants) across three sites. This equates to a total request of $1,260.87 per regular attendee (attending 30+ days) or $682.35 per participant (attending 1-29 days) served per year. The annual requested amount will be distributed to each site according to the number of students served and meets allocation percent requirements.

Student Needs Assessments (20 possible points) 

The Council Bluffs Community School District (CBCSD) is the eighth largest school district in Iowa. Among the district’s 15 schools, 10 have active 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) grants. This project will provide 21st CCLC programs at three school locations to 230 regular attendees (425 total participants) per year who are at risk for poor academic and social outcomes. The project will serve students at Carter Lake Elementary (CLE), Roosevelt Elementary (RVE), and Gerald W. Kirn Middle (GWK). All three schools are located within the CBCSD in western Iowa’s Pottawattamie County and meet the criteria for school-wide Title I eligibility, with over 40% of children eligible for the free/reduced price lunch program (FRL).

 

Evidence of Need: Students at CLE, RVE, and GWK, particularly those belonging to specific student subgroups (described in Student Population), experience greater-than-average academic achievement gaps. These academic needs – as well as social-emotional needs that have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic – are evidenced by objective data that includes school assessment data reported by the Iowa Department of Education, Iowa Youth Survey results, parent/student responses to needs assessment questionnaires, and performance data for current 21st CCLC programming at CLE and RVE.

 

Student Population: Each school has higher percentages of students in most of the following subgroups as compared with district and state averages: students with disabilities (as indicated by an individualized education plan/IEP), students identified as English Language Learners (ELL), and students from low-income households (as indicated by FRL status). Individual student population breakdowns are as follows, according to 2020 enrollment data:

CLE - Total enrollment: 346; IEP: 20.8%; ELL: 7.2%; FRL: 83.8%

RVE - Total enrollment: 409; IEP: 14.9%; ELL: 10.0%; FRL: 74.1%

GWK - Total enrollment: 1,029; IEP: 19.2%; ELL: 5.6%; FRL: 53.1%

CBCSD - IEP: 17.9%; ELL: 7.1%; FRL: 47.4%

State of Iowa - IEP: 12.9%; ELL: 6.5%; FRL: 42.4%

 

Academic Achievement Gaps:

CLE: Of the three schools in this proposed project, CLE has the most students from low-income households, with 83.8% qualifying for the FRL program. This is nearly double the state average of 42.4%. FRL students are less likely to participate in extracurricular activities due to financial barriers, so the cost-free 21st CCLC programming is essential to supporting their academic and social-emotional engagement and enrichment.


According to 2019-20 assessment data, the most recent available due to pandemic-related academic interruptions, only 45.3% of FRL students scored as proficient in reading (building average 46.0%, state average 69.8%) and 45.7% in math (building average 45.5%, state average 70.2%). Furthermore, one out of every five students (20.8%) at CLE has a disability (as indicated by an IEP), and only 39.4% of these students meet proficiency in reading and 41.6% in math.

 

RVE: Nearly three out of four students at RVE (74.1%) qualify for FRL. Only 47.6% of these students scored proficient in reading, slightly higher than the building average of 43.4%. While 63.1% of FRL students at RVE met proficiency in math (building average 65.1%), this is still below state average.

 

GWK: The most significant achievement gaps at GWK are among ELL students. According to 2019-20 assessment data, only 19.6% of ELL students were proficient in reading, compared with 66.4% of all students. In addition,19.6% of ELL students were proficient in math, compared with 62.9% of all students. ELL students at GWK need the type of targeted, individualized support provided by 21st CCLC programs.



Only 22.6% of students with IEPs and 58.3% of FRL students scored as proficient in reading, compared with 66.4% at the building level and 69.8% at the state level. Math proficiency scores are similar: only 17.4% of GWK students with IEPs and 56.2% of FRL students met state standards (building average 62.9%, state average 70.2%).


In addition to these scores, GWK students also post attendance rates lower than state average (93.8% compared with 94.7%) and chronic absenteeism rates higher than state average (18.3% compared with 15.2%).

 

Social-Emotional Needs: Pottawattamie County is ranked as one of the least healthy counties in Iowa, according to health factors reported by the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute (County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, 2021). Pottawattamie County residents are at greater risk for physical and mental distress; are more likely to engage in unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, alcohol use, and being physically inactive; and are less likely to graduate high school than other Iowans. These factors can lead to increased adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in children, which can significantly disrupt a child’s overall health and development. Pottawattamie County children need access to positive extracurricular enrichment activities and social-emotional learning (SEL) to counteract these environmental concerns.


CBCSD students have self-reported these concerns as well. The Iowa Youth Survey is distributed every two to three years (most recently in 2018) to students in grades 6, 8, and 11 in Iowa public and private schools. It seeks to better understand environmental factors affecting student, family, and community behaviors, attitudes, and beliefs. Of the over 1,200 Pottawattamie County students who responded to the survey, 20% indicated that during the past year, they felt so sad or hopeless that they stopped participating in their normal activities, and 16% indicated that they had serious suicidal thoughts. Unfortunately, these statistics likely have increased since this report, due to the pandemic. National research indicates that emergency room visits for suspected suicide attempts among adolescents increased by 31% from 2019 to 2020 (Yard, Ballesteros, et al., 2021).


Now more than ever, students need SEL programming. According to counseling staff at GWK, “Students are in crisis. They have lost so much social-emotional instruction the past 20 months. They are essentially functioning socially, emotionally, and behaviorally two years behind where they should be.” Counselors at CLE emphasized the need for practicing regulation skills to help students who are struggling with “managing their big feelings.” Staff at both sites agreed that 21st CCLC programming benefits students by providing opportunities to interact with others, improve social skills, and develop friendships with students who have similar interests.

 

Available Resources: High-quality and dependable out-of-school-time programming is important for the high percentage of families with low incomes at these sites. Without CBCSD’s free 21st CCLC programs, parents’ only childcare options are fee-based programs, such as Kids & Company (available to RVE) and Boys & Girls Clubs (available to CLE). These programs do not provide the level of targeted support that 21st CCLC programs offer. For example, Boys & Girls Clubs serves a broad range of students from elementary through high school, so students may not receive the individualized academic support they need. In addition, these programs typically see higher staff turnover, affecting program quality and student experience.

 

Stakeholder Involvement: As discussed in the Partnerships section, CBCSD solicits ongoing feedback from community partners that provide 21st CCLC programming activities. This input helps to guide decision-making in the types of clubs and activities offered and identifies both programming gaps and additional potential partner community groups or organizations. In addition, CBCSD annually surveys parents/guardians and students in the targeted schools, gathering diverse perspectives of programming needs.

CLE and RVE: Of the 77 parents who responded to the survey, 56 (72.7%) indicated that continued afterschool programs would be “very beneficial” to their household and agreed that it would negatively impact their household if there were no afterschool programs offered at their school. As both CLE and RVE have high rates of FRL-eligible students, many families face significant financial barriers. One parent noted that, “Without this program I would not be able to work. As a single full time mom I cannot afford before or after school care for my children,” and another commented that she and her husband both need to work as many hours as possible in order to make ends meet, and “…without the clubs, we would be severely struggling financially.”


GWK: Of the 129 GWK students who responded, 80 (62%) indicated that they would participate in afterschool clubs if they had more options. Of the 161 GWK parents/guardians who responded (including 39 parents/guardians of fifth graders at feeder schools, who will attend GWK during the next school year), 101 (62.7%) indicated that free before/after school opportunities would be “very beneficial” to their family. Nearly two-thirds of parents/guardians (66.5%, n=107) indicated that they “strongly agree” that homework help provided in an afterschool program provides support for their student that they are not able to consistently provide.


Additional parent comments expressed enthusiasm for restoring 21stCCLC programming at GWK. For example, one parent commented, “We would be grateful if this programming could be brought back to [GWK]! It would help our daughter… to have the enrichment after school that we cannot provide while we are at work.” Another parent highlighted the social-emotional benefits of 21stCCLC programs, stating that “My student is very reserved and does not have good experiences making friends. The ability to socialize with peers… would be very advantageous for my student. He needs the ability to socialize… in a more relaxed yet engaging setting [so he can develop] the social skills to navigate a college and work environment.”

 

Intended Impact: Both CLE and RVE have seen significant academic improvements among students through 21st CCLC programming. Over the past two years, despite significant programming disruptions and setbacks, the CLE and RVE 21stCCLC programs have met 90% of local evaluation goals (including literacy, math, behavior, and attendance goals). In addition, office referrals have been reduced by over 50% over the past five years at both of these sites. Staff believe that these trends will continue through the proposed program enhancements and expansion at CLE and RVE.


At GWK, not only will 21st CCLC programming help to address achievement gaps and provide SEL opportunities, but the before-school programming in particular will support improved student attendance. For example, a past “breakfast club” at GWK, where students gathered before school to prepare and eat breakfast with one another, helped get these students into the building. In addition, 137 (85%) of GWK parents/guardians surveyed “strongly agreed” that clubs/activities encourage students to attend school more frequently, and 141 (87.6%) strongly agreed that this programming provides a safe space for their student(s). Student responses support this as well: 82 (63.6%) students indicated that having a variety of afterschool clubs would make them excited to come to school.


Transportation, Safety, and Accessibility: Transportation to and from school is the responsibility of students’ families. 21st CCLC funding allows for transportation to be provided for students attending afterschool programming, summer programming, and field trips. Being in afterschool care lowers the risk of otherwise unsupervised juveniles committing a crime. According to the Council Bluffs Police Department (CBPD), juvenile crime committed between 2:00pm and 5:00pm has decreased since middle school programs began in the fall of 2014, as well as when the first elementary school programs started in the fall of 2015. The CBPD reported in 2019-20 that juvenile arrests had decreased to an all-time low at 108.

 

Project (24 possible points) 

Organization Expertise: CBCSD currently operates 21st CCLC programming at 10 of the district’s 15 sites, including at CLE and RVE. During the 2020-21 summer and school year, CBCSD’s 21st CCLC grant-funded programs reached more than 1,800 students (22% of district enrollment), with 585 students attending 30 or more days. In 2019, CBCSD earned the 21st CCLC Star Award for Attendance (Iowa Afterschool Alliance). Over the past 5 years of programming, professional development and committee involvement has kept CBCSD’s core 21stCCLC staff skilled at incorporating best practices to provide quality experiences for all youth and families.

 

Proposed Activities: CBCSD proposes to expand and enhance existing 21st CCLC programming at CLE and RVE by growing the number of community partners and activities offered and reaching more students. This project will also restore programming at GWK, which has not had a 21st CCLC program since the 2017-18 school year. The proposed program will address the academic achievement gaps between subgroups in reading and math, as described in the Student Needs Assessment section, and will provide academic assistance, academic and life skills enrichment, SEL/emotional regulation, adult skill-building, and family engagement activities as required by the state. Activities include the following:


1. Academic Assistance (needs addressed: achievement gaps in reading and math among student subgroups): certified teaching staff will provide homework help and one-to-one tutoring in math, reading, science, and other areas as needed, with an emphasis on literacy and math.

- Literacy: The before-school programs at CLE and RVE focus heavily on literacy activities, such as staff reading a book and leading follow-up enrichment activities. CBCSD uses the Wonders curriculum for reading and support during more targeted afterschool academic support activities. This comprehensive, research-based literacy solution includes a teacher modeling approach, which leads to guided practice and helps students become independent readers. It drives student reading achievement by forming solid foundational skills, developing close reading skills, differentiating instruction with scaffolded support, utilizing technology to engage students, and advising instruction through assessment. The Lexia® Core5® adaptive learning program will support differentiated literacy instruction. It provides students with personalized reading paths, regardless of ability, and encourages the development of foundational skills, including structural analysis and comprehension, aligned to state standards.

GWK will use Leveled Literacy for small-group reading instruction and reading workshops that utilize Reading Recovery for targeted, one-on-one student literacy supports. Reading Recovery has been shown to be successful in reducing achievement gaps among student subgroups (such as students from low-income households, students with disabilities, and ELL students). GWK will emphasize this intervention for students with IEPs. 21st CCLC participants will also be encouraged to participate in book clubs such as Project Lit (emphasis on diversity) and Battle of the Books (emphasis on reading comprehension through quizzes).

- Math: At CLE and RVE, the Bridges Intervention curriculum framework will engage students with models that spark thinking and build confidence in mathematics. It is designed to complement regular math instruction and is ideal for use with individuals and small groups. Moving from manipulatives to two-dimensional representations and mental images, this curriculum is organized by content rather than grade level. Within a small group, such as an after-school club of 15 students to one adult, progress monitoring will be ongoing and consistent with a Response to Intervention (RTI) or Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) framework.

GWK implements leveled math intervention based on MAP scores and classroom performance. Because of the success of this intervention at the 6thgrade level, GWK plans to expand its use into 7th and 8thgrades as well.

Specific individualized supports will target students who have been identified by the principal and school-day teachers as most academically at-risk; however, these supports will be made available to all children attending 21st CCLC programs. CBCSD will communicate with other staff in the district who are providing resources from Title I, II, and III funding to provide opportunities, professional development, and resources to students, families, and staff at 21st CCLC sites. To accommodate ELL students, the bilingual liaison in the student and family services department will provide translation assistance, and school day teachers will provide lesson plans that use curricula modules differentiated for ELL. 21stCCLC staff will work with the district’s special education teachers and behavior consultants to ensure the program framework accommodates students with IEPs through regular one-on-one meetings. All program materials, family engagement activities and resources, communication with families, and field trips will be available in Spanish, and an interpreter will be present at events.

 

2. Educational Enrichment (needs addressed: social-emotional development, reduction in behavior issues, and improvements in attendance): In addition to targeted literacy and math programming prioritized through this project, CBCSD’s proposed 21st CCLC project activities will provide a wide variety of before- and afterschool clubs and activities through the engagement of community partners. The following examples of programming will support federally allowable activities:

- Literacy education programs: TS Bank will provide financial literacy programs, and partners like Fontenelle Forest and Hitchcock nature center will offer environmental literacy programs that educate students on animals and the environment, with hands-on opportunities for outdoor activities.

- Tutoring services: Staff will provide targeted tutoring services at the elementary level based on MAP scores and IEPs. At GWK, staff will offer a “help desk” that has been successful for small-group and individualized 1:1 attention. Homework help is also offered five days per week.

- Programs for limited English proficient students: CBCSD will engage bilingual staff and ELL teachers to help reach ELL students who may need additional support.

- Mathematics and science education activities: CBCSD will offer clubs focused on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), including the popular robotics club offered by community partner Vex Robotics, which explores building a robot, coding, and programming. Iowa State Extension also offers a Kids in the Kitchen program and take-home STEM kits.

- Arts and music and cultural education activities: Kaneko will provide fine arts instructors who lead arts activities. Additional clubs may focus on cultural education, such as “Around the World Club” at the middle school level.

- Physical fitness, nutrition education, and recreation: Fitucate will offer both nutrition and physical fitness clubs, and partners like Central Athletics and Future Fitness will offer sports-focused activities like cheer, tennis, and soccer. CBCSD may also engage partners like HyVee to offer cooking classes focused on healthy recipes.

- Drug and violence prevention, behavior education: Counselors will lead SEL activities, engaging the district SEL coordinator as a resource for using a trauma-informed lens.

- Youth leadership and character-building activities: Students will have the opportunity to participate in the 21st CCLC advisory group, gaining leadership experience and helping to shape their programming.

- Entrepreneurial education: TS Bank will offer a program that teaches students about business and entrepreneurship. The program includes a field trip to Des Moines for a full simulation and practice running a business.

- Volunteer and community service: GWK students will have the opportunity to volunteer at a local nursing home.

- College and career awareness and preparation: At GWK, Iowa Western Community College will provide career and technical education (CTE) programming, including on-site career-related simulations and informational brochures, handouts, and program materials..

- Services for children with disabilities: 21st CCLC staff participate in IEP meetings and work with teachers and parents to ensure student success and alignment with their schoolwork and IEP. Staff will also offer walk-in events that help make parents and students more comfortable with attending programming.

- Parenting skills: CBCSD will engage partners such as the Child and Family Resource Network in Council Bluffs to promote monthly Parent Cafes. At these events, 21st CCLC provides childcare and meals while parents attend a safe space to share struggles and successes and learn communication and resilience skills.

- Law enforcement: The local police department and other first responders (e.g., the fire department) will visit the sites to host enrichment activities.

- Supervised field trips: CBCSD will offer regular field trips to local partner sites (e.g., botanical gardens), with the goal of once or twice per month.

- Assistance to students who have been truant, suspended, or expelled: The proposed program will address attendance, particularly at GWK, by offering breakfast clubs and library clubs during before-school programming.

 

3. Family Engagement (needs addressed: improved academic and social-emotional support at home): Family engagement activities will be provided at least quarterly to increase parent involvement in the school buildings served by this project. The public library will promote and provide literacy-based resources for families, such as read-along events and strategies for parents reading at home. Community partnerships will offer extra support and services for families, such as the adult education department at Iowa Western Community College, which is positioned to offer English language literacy, GED, and HiSET support and/or certification and help connect families to other skill-building resources.

 

Days/Hours of Operation: The elementary school 21st CCLC before-school program at CLE and RVE will operate from 7:30am to 8:55am Monday through Friday, with afterschool programs available from 3:45pm to 5:15pm Tuesday through Friday, with extended care from 5:15pm to 6:00pm. Mondays are early release days, and the program will operate from 2:05pm to 6:00pm. This is a total of 20.02 hours per week.

The middle school 21st CCLC program at GWK will operate from 6:30am to 7:30am Monday through Friday and 2:30pm to 4:30pm Tuesday through Friday. Mondays are early release days, and the program will operate from 1:00pm to 3:00pm. This is a total of 15 hours per week. Assuming typical 4-week months, these weekly estimates equate to 80.08 hours per month at the elementary level and 60 hours per month at the middle school level, meeting (and exceeding) state requirements. These totals do not include the extended care time (four hours per week) or family engagement events (two to four hours each), which occur at least quarterly.

 

Summer Program: Summer programming for all three sites will operate for at least 30 days (with additional time for data collection/evaluation) between mid-June and mid-July. The program will run from 8:30am to 3:00pm Monday through Friday for a total of 32.5 hours per week, meeting state requirements. Elementary students attend Camp Summer Explore, targeting students reading below grade level. The district’s chief academic officer provides oversight to the summer programming due to its alignment with district priorities for early literacy. Middle school programming will take place in partnership with Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium. 21st CCLC funds support a portion of staffing and transportation, ensuring access and a low staff-to-student ratio.

 

Healthy Snack: CBCSD offers 21st CCLC participants a healthy snack each day after school, provided through the school nutrition services vendor. Healthy snacks will meet USDA nutritional guidelines to ensure students will be recharged for the learning activities. Excess snacks are either donated or placed in a sharing basket for students to take extra items. CBCSD has recently incorporated additional protein items such as white and chocolate milk, turkey sticks, yogurt, and cheese sticks into the snack offerings at 21stCCLC program sites.

 


Goals and Objectives:

- Goal 1: Improve student growth in reading

- Objective 1: Greater than 50% of regular attendees will demonstrate typical growth from fall to spring on Reading MAP assessments

- Goal 2: Improve student growth in mathematics

- Objective 2: Greater than 50% of regular attendees will demonstrate typical growth from fall to spring on Math MAP assessments

- Goal 3: Improve in-school attendance

- Objective 3: In-school average daily attendance rate for regular attendees will be within 10 percentage points of the school average or higher

- Goal 4: Improve in-school behavior

- Objective 4: Disciplinary incidents for in-school behavior of regular attendees will be less than the school average

- Goal 5: Improve parent perception of program impact

- Objective 5: Of the parents responding, 50% will indicate via survey that the program had a positive impact on their child’s educational growth


These goals are reasonable given the ongoing challenges associated with navigating the COVID-19 pandemic. While in-person instruction and many activities have resumed for the 2021-22 school year, a trend that we anticipate will continue to improve in the 2022-23 school year, CBCSD schools are facing atypical benchmarks for student performance. Anecdotally, counseling staff have also expressed difficulties/increases in challenging behavior, as described in the Student Needs Assessment section that we anticipate will have an impact on student performance on academic assessments.

 

Alignment with School Day Instruction: To ensure alignment with school-day instruction, educational specialists from the school will provide lesson plans to 21stCCLC program staff to use during individual tutoring/homework help. Program staff have quarterly meetings with the school principals to create a clear line of communication. This allows the 21st CCLC program to align with each school’s strategic plan, collaborate for and during family events, connect with school-specific community partners, and engage school-day staff to provide curriculum-based instruction to program participants in an engaging manner.


In addition, CBCSD routinely utilizes regular school-day staff members to help run and support the program. This is especially beneficial for students with IEPs. Often, the CBCSD teachers and staff members who work most closely with ELL students and students with IEPs also serve as 21st CCLC program staff. These staff members recognize the academic and social-emotional benefits of the 21st CCLC programming, encourage their students to attend, and are able to provide individualized, targeted support. A guidance counselor will deliver a social-emotional skills class at CLE, and building-level behavior specialists will serve on the advisory group. A reading specialist may implement a club program or read with children during snack time, at the request of the school principal. The custodians may lead a club program engaging students in service-learning and leadership opportunities through general housekeeping activities, such as assisting younger students with throwing their trash away after snack.

Research Base (5 possible points)  

CBCSD’s 21st CCLC programming design is based on educational research and evidence and local evaluation data from existing CBCSD program sites.

 

Whole Child Development: The Iowa Model for 21st CCLC programs focuses on all areas a child needs to have fulfilled in order to feel safe, engaged, supported, healthy, and encouraged to do their best in academic and enrichment settings. This model involves three areas of focus:

1. Social-Emotional Development Needs - positive, caring relationships with peers and adults to develop a sense of belonging and safety. CBCSD engages trusted adults and staff members to deliver programming, using the “Zones of Regulation” SEL framework and providing opportunities to interact and develop relationships with peers.

2. Cognitive Development Needs - opportunities to gain new information, ideas, and skills to foster a value for learning. CBCSD meets this through the provision of a wide variety of clubs and activities, tutoring and homework help, and field trips with partner sites (e.g., Iowa Western, where GWK students will participate in career and technical education).

3. Physical Development Needs - nutritional and recreational support for health and well-being. CBCSD meets this through the provision of a healthy snack and by engaging community partners to offer clubs focused on physical activities such as soccer and tennis, with a variety of options to fit each student’s needs and preferences.

 

Reading Interventions: CBCSD uses the evidence-based Lexia® Core5® intervention at the elementary level. A randomized control study found that students identified by a Chicago school district with reading disabilities made significantly greater gains on the MAP test than control students (Hurwitz & Vanacore, 2020). CBCSD also uses Wonders, which has been shown to significantly increase Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) scores of Title 1 students (Dorsey, 2015). Local Data: During the 2020-21 school year, of 379 CBCSD elementary students in 21stCCLC programming, 95.6%% of students scoring below the typical RIT for fall (i.e. “needing improvement”) improved their test scores between fall and winter on the MAP. The total percentage of regular attendees (grades K-12) demonstrating improvement in reading was 89.9%.

GWK uses two evidence-based reading interventions to supplement classroom literacy work, including Leveled Literacy, which provides daily, intensive small-group instruction (Fountas & Pinnell, 2009). For students with IEPs, the district uses Reading Recovery, which provides a framework for targeted, one-on-one student literacy supports and has been shown to reduce achievement gaps across student subgroups, including those identified at the proposed schools. Reading Recovery is supported by over 30 years of research and evaluation (Florida Center for Reading Research, Florida State University, 2008).



 

Math Interventions: CBCSD uses the standards-based Bridges Intervention curriculum at the elementary level. Local Data: During the 2019-20 school year, of 382 CBCSD elementary students in 21stCCLC programming identified as scoring “needs improvement” on the NWEA MAP scores, 95.6% of students improved their test scores. The total percentage of regular attendees (grades K-12) demonstrating improvement in math was 89.9%.

 

SEL: CBCSD incorporates the evidence-informed framework, Zones of Regulation, into its programming. According to the Afterschool Alliance article, Taking a Deeper Dive into Afterschool: Positive Outcomes and Promising Practices, “Positive afterschool program staff-student relationships create an environment in which students feel safe and supported, fostering student growth socially, emotionally, and academically” (2014, p.18). Zones of Regulation is based upon a cognitive behavior approach to self-regulation (2011, Social Thinking Publishing).

Management and Sustainability Plan (20 points) 

Staffing Plan: CBCSD will ensure effective staffing for the proposed project through the utilization and expansion of its existing 21st CCLC staffing model. This includes a student-to-staff ratio of 15:1, which allows for relationship-building and attention to student needs. Volunteers, Kids & Company staff, and the Council Bluffs Schools Foundation (CBSF) contribute to this successful staffing model. Not only is it crucial to provide proper manpower and support for club program activities and field trips, but it sustains program planning, implementation of best practices, and evaluation. As described in the Project section, 21stCCLC program staff regularly engage with school-day staff to ensure continuity of curriculum and instruction. All staff, community partners, and volunteers are subject to background checks, including the Iowa Department of Criminal Investigation, Iowa Department of Transportation, and Iowa and Nebraska Child Sexual Abuse Registry.

 

Recruitment and Retention of Qualified Staff: The CBCSD human resources department supports the recruitment, hiring, and management of any district staff or outside individuals, such as 21st CCLC club leaders, assistant club leaders, and youth development workers (YDW). CBCSD will target certified teachers from the district as a primary recruitment source for club leaders, tutors, and homework help staff. All staff are required to meet Iowa DHS requirements for the positions, have relative work experience, and hold appropriate levels of education.

 

Professional Development: 21st CCLC program staff who also currently serve in another role within the district participate in professional development for all levels each Monday. Other district-wide training for all staff covers trauma-informed strategies, Chapter 103, sexual harassment policy and prevention, Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) record confidentiality, hazard communication, blood-borne pathogens, and fire safety and emergency procedures. This project budget also allocates 5% of each 21st CCLC site toward professional development regarding program evaluation and best practices, family engagement, student support strategies, state and national level conferences focused on 21st CCLC programming, etc. Staff will also receive continuous support and coaching on best practices as needed. Additional professional development resources include the Green Hills Area Education Agency (AEA), Iowa Afterschool Alliance, and You 4 Youth webinars and courses, and represent CBCSD programs at multiple 21st CCLC committees organized by the state.

 

Leadership Plan: 21st CCLC leadership includes representation from the office the superintendent, the chief of teaching and learning, and the chief of student and family services for the district, as well as the other high-level positions the 21stCCLC programs will have access to for data information, technology support, transportation management, bilingual services, nutrition services, and navigation of student and family resources.

 

Volunteer Involvement: Recruitment efforts at Iowa Western Community College, along with colleges and universities in Omaha, Nebraska, will focus on students seeking a degree in education. Other rich sources for student volunteers are the two CBCSD high schools proposed in this application. As current high school students, they would apply to be a mentor volunteer at the elementary school level to assist club leaders with program implementation.

 

The following qualifications are required for project staff:

21st CCLC Program Director (PD) (full-time, existing) – provides leadership over 21st CCLC programs. This position must possess a bachelor’s degree and be pursuing a graduate degree. Day-to-day functions include program strategy; management of site budgets and fiscal reporting; professional development planning; oversight of the evaluation process; and grant progress, compliance, and data reporting. The PD meets quarterly with building principals and the chief academic officer to ensure alignment with the school-day; meets with assessment and data director-level staff to determine achievement outcomes; serves as the main advisory liaison and lead in partnership development, program sustainability planning, and stakeholder cultivation; and meets weekly with the chief of student & family services, assistant director, and program coordinators to provide strategic decision-making.

21st CCLC Assistant Director (AD) (full-time, existing) - assists the director in day-to-day functions. This position must possess a bachelor’s degree. The AD assists with direct supervision of site facilitators and works with the HR department on hiring; supports staff training and professional development; and supports and mentors coordinators. The AD coordinates data items such as attendance, student achievement, and discipline for students in 21stCCLC programs and assists with the grant writing process.

(2) Elementary Program Coordinator (EPD) (full-time, existing) - This position must possess a bachelor’s degree. The EPD tracks, analyzes, and shares program participation attendance data; oversees site facilitators for assigned schools; trains site leaders and staff; assists with program evaluation and best practices; organizes and supports school-day alignment with out-of-school instruction, academic interventions, and enrichment activities; and assists with partnership development, program sustainability planning, and stakeholder cultivation.



Site Facilitator, CLE (part-time, existing) - This position will provide site-based leadership on a day-to-day basis; organize activities and facilitate field trips; supervise club leaders, club assistants, youth development workers, and volunteers; monitor and procure supplies and materials; assist with anecdotal data for state evaluation; work directly with students; ensure grant goals and objectives are being met; and attend family events, parent/teacher conferences, etc. to keep parents informed about activities and collect input.

Site Facilitator, RVE (part-time, existing) – Same expectations as CLE Site Facilitator.

Site Facilitator, GWK (part-time) – Same expectations as CLE Site Facilitator.

Youth Development Workers (multiple) - This position leads student groups for planned after school programs, assists with after school transition, assists the site facilitator with attendance and snack tracking, and assists with family engagement events when needed.

Kids & Company staff (multiple; RVE only) – Staff supervise recreation and enrichment activities; assist with distribution of healthy snacks; and create and share lesson plans for club programs.

 

Transportation, Security, and Accessibility

CBCSD’s collaboration with Kids & Company (RVE) and Boys & Girls Clubs (CLE) offers extended hours for care beyond the 21st CCLC program hours to allow for parents to pick up youth. With student safety being a top priority, all students in the attendance area are offered transportation. Note that CBCSD serves a primarily urban area, not rural. CBCSD’s plan, in collaboration with the district’s transportation coordinator, includes:

- A daily late bus will serve students who are living outside school attendance areas. Any students with special needs attending 21stCCLC clubs will receive extra staff support and special transportation as specified in the students’ IEP.

- Transportation will be provided to all off-campus activities and events through grant funds. Staff members will ride along on field trips for supervision and to ensure student safety.

- An application will be completed by the parent/guardian that includes specific questions regarding any special needs, disabilities, etc. to ensure appropriate buses are provided.

- Program-wide check-in/check-out system will be used at all CBCSD 21stCCLC sites in which elementary students participating in CCLC’s are walked to the program space by their daytime teacher to check-in; attendance is taken and all students are accounted for.

- All buildings have locked entrances with camera security systems for safety.

- Any staff from partner organizations will wear identification badges, and a list of staff from the partnering organization is sent to the 21stCCLC Site Facilitator in advance for reference.

- ADA requirements will be met to accommodate student needs and diverse abilities.

- Translation services will be provided at family events and on all forms of communication and program registration through district translators and interpreters.

- A parent/guardian/emergency contact information and youth medical form will be required.

- All staff, volunteers, and bus drivers will be extensively screened for criminal offenses by the CBCSD and transportation partner, First Student. This includes a screening of the National Registry for Child Sexual Abuse. Six-month rechecks for driving records are and will be conducted on all bus drivers.

- Walkie talkies used at all sites will provide a line of communication for all staff during program hours, in case of any emergencies or potential threats. Classroom/cell phones and a Google Hangout group will serve as a second and third line of communication.

 

Stakeholder Advisory Group

Each 21st CCLC site will have an advisory group facilitated by the coordinator. The following individuals or representatives from the following organizations will be invited to serve on the representative councils: the behavior consultant from each building, the district social-emotional wellness coordinator, a building reading specialist/instructional coach and literacy coach, the building principal and/or curricula specialist, a parent, a community partner, at least one parent of a regular attending student, and a youth participant. Advisory groups will meet monthly in person or via Zoom to review formative data (attendance, student grades, teacher and parent feedback) and discuss additional ways to engage families and community partners to address needs and participation in the program. The advisory group will also review the final evaluation (summative data) annually and make recommendations on program refinements. In addition, the student representative will likely be a member of the youth advisory club at each site.

 

Continuous Improvement Plan

To continuously improve programming, CBCSD engages a professional evaluator (as described in the Evaluation section) to assist with ongoing formative data analysis and monitoring progress toward goals. In addition, 21st CCLC staff gather and track data using a software program called Youth Services to continuously monitor and encourage attendance and enrollment. This software is helpful in creating paper and electronic schedules for families and tracking the level of engagement by program services areas, and it has the ability to connect with parents and/or students about their lack of attendance. In hopes of increasing and keeping attendance levels high, 21st CCLC program staff are continuously trained and encouraged to utilize Youth Services reports for their site to determine any student’s level of participation, create student awareness of their attendance, and encourage achievement of higher levels of attendance for incentives, such as becoming a regular attendee (30 or more days).

 

Another effort to continuously expand the reach of 21st CCLC programs involves surveying all populations involved – students, parents, staff, and community partners – informally through conversation and site visits and officially at the end of each school year regarding the areas of struggle or success at each site. Staff disseminate these surveys through an email with a link to a Google Form, a phone call reminder, and a paper flyer with a link. All forms of communication (phone, email, paper) are provided in both English and Spanish. Site visits and observations of programs occur weekly by full-time 21st CCLC program staff, which includes either program coordinators, the assistant program director, or the program director. Each 21stCCLC site facilitator has access to their program’s observational feedback and survey results, which involves a follow-up discussion between the site facilitator and the program coordinator regarding best practices and areas of growth. Ideally, by hearing from all parties involved in 21st CCLC programs, CBCSD can gain insight into 





necessary changes that would increase overall engagement and attendance. The external evaluator also receives this survey data to determine issues and successes.

 

Sustainability History

CBCSD has operated 21st CCLC programs since the 2014-15 school year, growing from two program sites to a current total of ten. During that time, the district has significantly grown the number of community partners involved, as demonstrated in the attached MOUs and Past Grantee Sustainability Form. For example, since its first year of offering 21st CCLC programs, CBCSD has grown its number of community partners from 16 to over 100 (including both unpaid partners and paid vendors). The district will leverage existing relationships to continue its historical incremental increase in community partners. By maintaining a strong community presence and regularly soliciting partner input, CBCSD has stretched beyond its current reach within the community to find even more local organizations interested in partnering to provide opportunities to students, as well as explored deeper levels of involvement with both current and previous community partners. These partnerships allow CBCSD to increasingly serve more students through 21stCCLC programs and significantly strengthen the programs’ quality and impact. When local professionals provide instruction within their own fields of expertise, students receive high-quality information from individuals who are passionate about the subject matter. An example of this is the engagement of Iowa Western Community College, which will provide CTE programs to middle school students as part of the proposed project. Partnerships such as this facilitate experiences that typically would not be available to elementary and middle school students, staff, and families.

Communication Plan (5 possible points)

Partnerships (10 possible points) 

CBCSD will provide leadership, vision, and program implementation toward higher student achievement and engagement for the proposed 21st CCLC programming. The district provides safe, accessible facilities; a highly qualified program director; and certified teaching staff for academic clubs, homework help, and enrichment programs. CBCSD incorporates family programming, including literacy programs and wraparound community services for child/family needs.

 

A variety of supportive community organizations provide services and opportunities to CBCSD youth involved in 21st CCLC programs. The network of partnerships reaches deep throughout the community to address and alleviate the needs of students and families across the district. Nearly 100 community partnerships of all levels have been developed in the ten current CBCSD 21st CCLC programs throughout past programming. CBCSD’s vision is to continue to grow this network with in-depth involvement with partners like Iowa Western Community College, Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, and purposefully guided advisory groups to steer outreach among partners.

 

The following partnerships (as detailed in the attached MOUs) are examples of these partners and key to the proposed project:

1. Council Bluffs Schools Foundation (CBSF): Will provide Kids & Company staffing (RVE only) to assist with attendance tracking, snack distribution, physical activity, enrichment activities, and field trips. CBSF will also partner with CBCSD on all recruitment efforts, such as family nights, email communication, social media, and printed materials. CBSF will provide background checks for all Kids & Company employees and volunteers. Goal areas impacted: reading and math growth, attendance, behavior, and family engagement; value of partnership: $35,000 per year

2. Future Kids: facilitates a weekly fitness/physical activity program at all three sites. Goal areas impacted: health and nutrition; value of partnership: $200 per site per semester, or $1,200 per year

3. Iowa State Extension: will facilitate weekly activities (with lesson plans pre-approved by 21st CCLC) at all three sites, as well as field trip opportunities. Goal areas impacted: reading and math growth; value of partnership: $125 per session, with approximately 32 sessions per site per year = $12,000 per year

4. Iowa Western University – Adult Education and Career Experience: will provide CTE programming at GWK, as well as brochures, handouts, and program materials to support adult literacy for families. Goal areas impacted: reading and math growth, behavior, attendance, and family engagement; CTE programming; value of partnership: $1,200 per school year

5. Kaneko: will provide staffing, materials, and supplies to support weekly arts/creativity-based activities at GWK. Goal areas impacted: attendance and social-emotional; value of partnership: $4,700 per six-week session

6. Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo: will provide weekly Zoo2You clubs at CLE and RVE, as well as summer programming for GWK students. Henry Doorly Zoo will provide a zoo educator and materials to support STEM-based interactive programming. Goal areas impacted: reading and math growth; value of partnership: $20 per session per site

7. TS Bank: will provide leader/instructor and lesson plans to support weekly financial literacy activities and field trip opportunities at all three sites. Goal areas impacted: reading and math growth; value of partnership: $150 per session

8. Christy Arthur (Vex Robotics) will facilitate a weekly robotics club program at all three sites, providing equipment in-kind. Goal areas impacted: reading and math growth; value of partnership: $2,914 per year

 

Meaningful Engagement and Recruitment: Existing meaningful partnerships such as these will provide the foundation for programming at the 21st CCLC sites. Program staff meet with all partners at least once per month and maintain an ongoing dialogue to discuss needs and continuous quality improvement. Through close collaboration and clear communication, partnerships of all levels (full, partial, and vendors) will provide caring adults to deliver hands-on experiences, curriculum and staff support, field trip opportunities, programming services, and in-kind support. These contributions will enhance the positive impact of the 21st CCLC program for students’ academic, social-emotional, and physical development beyond what could be attained with only the resources from the district.


Not only does this improve the program experience for participants, but it also creates a rewarding experience for community organizations. For example, the club leader from Vex Robotics, which operates at multiple sites (including CLE and RVE), recently expressed her excitement at seeing growth and accomplishments among student participants. She noted, “My favorite moment was when a 3rd grader at Roosevelt was really struggling. He had cried, thrown robotics pieces to the floor, and tried to run out. Through the format given, he was able to settle down and recommit to the building process. He ended up being the only student in all of Council Bluffs that built a 90-degree planetary drive, and it worked! His grin was something I’ll never forget.”

 

CBCSD uses a variety of efforts to recruit new partnerships. On an approximately quarterly basis, 21st CCLC staff have a presence at community events such as the Council Bluffs Wellness Bash and Chamber of Commerce events. Staff distribute flyers and promotional materials, using these opportunities to make connections with local organizations and spread awareness about 21st CCLC programs within the community.


On a daily basis, as 21st CCLC staff monitor the program and assess ongoing needs, they consider the organizations and businesses they directly or indirectly encounter and whether they would be a good fit for a partnership to fulfill those needs. The annual Partners and Pastries event hosted by the district is one of the more official ways for collecting input and showing appreciation. At the event, each partner completes a small card that requests references for other organizations that may want to become involved in 21st CCLC programs. During this event, one of the partners is recognized as the Partner of the Year for going above and beyond to serve students and families within the programs. In addition to asking them to refer additional organizational partners, they are also asked to note whether they would welcome a field trip or visit as a guest speaker in school-year and summer programs. The most enjoyable aspect of this gathering is to invite students from one or more sites to share what they have learned as a result of participating in 21st CCLC programs. Previous years have involved a guitar club performance, arts and crafts displayed, an overall video of every 21st CCLC site and program in the district, and program highlights from the local evaluation, showing how partner participation has impacted students achievement.

 

These collaborative relationships and opportunities for meaningful input help CBCSD develop partnerships that are sustained over time, as evidenced by the growth in the number of community partners with which CBCSD has worked over the years. Through this proposed project, CBCSD will continue to grow this partner network, expanding and enhancing the opportunities for academic engagement and enrichment available to students.

Evaluation (10 possible points) 

Evaluator Expertise: The proposed project includes a rigorous and comprehensive evaluation plan conducted by an experienced external evaluator, Dr. Sherry Huffman (as evidenced in the attached MOU), that follows all grant requirements and government standards. Dr. Huffman conducts program evaluation at all CBCSD 21stCCLC program sites, including CLE and RVE. She will cooperate with district staff, program staff, and the Iowa Department of Education to develop local and state/federal reports, utilizing forms provided by the department. She will attend local evaluator training sessions hosted by the department and conduct site visits for observations of program implementation to gain a clear perspective of the programs beyond the data. These activities will provide more in-depth recommendations for the evaluation. Dr. Huffman has fifteen years of experience as an assessment consultant with the Green Hills Area Education Association, including data collection and analysis, instrument design, report creation, presentation of findings, process evaluation, and training facilitation on evaluation-related topics. She has consulted on school improvement and professional development for three years.

 

Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes:

As described in the Project section, CBCSD will pursue the following goals and objectives for the proposed 21st CCLC program. Each objective includes the most recent outcome data for Cohort 12 (which includes CLE and RVE) to demonstrate past performance.

- Goal 1: Improve student growth in reading

- Objective 1: Greater than 50% of regular attendees will demonstrate typical growth from fall to spring on Reading MAP assessments (2020-21: 61.7%)

- Goal 2: Improve student growth in mathematics

- Objective 2: Greater than 50% of regular attendees will demonstrate typical growth from fall to spring on Math MAP assessments (2020-21: 55.7%)

- Goal 3: Improve in-school attendance

- Objective 3: In-school average daily attendance rate for regular attendees will be within 10 percentage points of the school average or higher (2020-21: median school attendance rate for regular attendees was 92.7% compared to the average for all students at 96.5%)

- Goal 4: Improve in-school behavior

- Objective 4: Disciplinary incidents for in-school behavior of regular attendees will be less than the school average (2020-21: average for regular attendees was 3.48 compared to the 5.92 average for all students)

- Goal 5: Improve parent perception of program impact

- Objective 5: Of the parents responding, 50% will indicate via survey that the program had a positive impact on their child’s educational growth (2020-21: 92.9%)

 

Program objectives are based upon past performance and align with the updated strategic plans of the schools with 21st CCLC sites to assist in better collaboration with school administration. The evaluator will analyze data for 21st CCLC regular attendees regarding their growth from fall to spring. Data is evaluated using Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) assessments for both mathematics and reading, in-school attendance, and average behavior incidents, as well as parent feedback about the programs. These objectives reflect upon the level of school engagement for students who are regularly involved in summer and before- or after-school programs. Additional metrics tracked include the availability of nutritious snacks provided to program participants, the number and type of family events, participation, and summer program opportunities.


In addition to measuring outcomes associated with program objectives, the evaluator and program director will work together throughout the year to assess program implementation, examine evaluation plans and tools, attend evaluation professional development, and conduct monthly site visits to guide continuous program improvement (as described in the Management and Sustainability section) as listed below. Program staff will help collect and analyze data such as attendance, reading and math achievement, and survey results (parent, student, staff) to drive program improvements and share all results publicly to continuously build community support. Data collection, analysis, and publishing will occur according to the following schedule:

 

Evaluation Planning & Data Collection - Annually, Semi-Annually, Quarterly, As Needed

- Evaluation of family events (Sept/Dec/Mar/June): evaluate family engagement events.

- Survey development & administration (Jan-May): surveys to students, parents, program staff, community partners, and teachers.

- Data collection & evaluation review (May): review evaluation timeline and assess the alignment of all project goals, objectives, activities, and associated data collection tasks.

- Reporting form development (June-Nov): create reporting forms and data collection setup, including revision and review of external and local evaluation.

 

Plan Assessment & Continuous Improvement - Semi-Annually, Quarterly, As Needed

- Site and district consultation (as needed): consult with sites for idea generation based on trend results or identified challenges; consult with district data point person and grant administrator.

- Review of alignment (Sept/Dec/Mar/June): facilitate communication between 21st CCLC program staff, program coordinators, and program director to align site program to current academic focus and/or identified student needs.

- Process analysis (Nov/Apr): complete analysis and trend results; report district measures for process improvement and sustainability.

 

Reporting/Other - Annually, Semi-Annually, Quarterly, As Needed

- Review evaluation findings (Sept/Dec/Mar/June): facilitate program site sessions for data review and best practices.

- Report to stakeholders (Nov/Apr): generate report and present to site advisory groups, families, school board, and general public (newsletters, website, translated summary reports, face-to-face meetings).

- Federal reporting (as needed): oversee completion of the federal reports by site and grant cohort for 22 APR (3x/year), Local Evaluation (Nov), and Statewide Survey (Dec).

- Attend 21st CCLC evaluation committee meetings, on-site monitoring visits, and comprehensive site visit meetings per grant requirements.

 

Measure of Effectiveness: As of the 21st CCLC program director’s December 2021 report, programs funded by the 21st CCLC grants in 2020-21 reached over 1,800 student participants throughout the summer and school year, with 585 participants attending 30 or more days to become a “regular attendee” participant. More than four out of five program participants (82%) among all 21stCCLC cohorts were FRL-eligible during the school year.


At the elementary level (including CLE and RVE), 2020-21 data is based on 382 matched pairs where both fall and winter Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) MAP scores were available. Students scoring below the typical RIT score for fall were considered to need improvement; 95.6% of those students who attended regularly improved their test scores in math (2019-20: 93.6%), and 91.2% improved their scores in English (2019-20: 90.9%).


In both 2019-20 and 2020-21, Cohort 12 (which includes CLE and RVE) met 100% (5/5) of local evaluation objectives. Of all cohorts in 2019-20 (10, 11, 12, and 13) and all cohorts in 2020-21 (11, 12, 13, and 15), combined data from all sites met 100% (5/5) of local evaluation objectives.

Budget Narrative (10 possible points) 

Personnel ($208,600 Year 1) - Employing high-quality staff is important for program success and to reduce turnover. CBCSD has determined the necessary and reasonable number of staff positions and hours required to successfully implement the proposed programming based on experience operating 21st CCLC programs at the proposed sites and other sites throughout the district. Personnel funds will cover the following staff positions:

1. One site facilitator (part-time) at each school:

- CLE, RVE, GWK: $20/hour x 4 hours/day x 160 days x 3 sites = $12,800 per year per site

2. One youth development worker (part-time) at each elementary school:

- CLE, RVE: $15/hour x 2 hours/day x 160 days x 2 sites = $4,800 per year per site

3. Club leaders and club assistants per daily club program at each site. At the elementary schools, club leaders receive a stipend of $500/semester, and club assistants receive a stipend of $300/semester. At GWK, club leaders receive a stipend of $580 per semester. Based on current programming, CBCSD anticipates the following stipend totals per site:

- CLE: $6,000 per semester x 2 semesters = $12,000 per year

- RVE: $5,000 per semester x 2 semesters = $10,000 per year

- GWK: $8,000 per semester x 2 semesters = $16,000 per year

4. One program coordinator (full-time, divided between 4 sites) for elementary programs ($40,000 total annual salary, with $20,000 included in this request):

- CLE, RVE: $10,000 per year per site





5. One program coordinator (full-time, divided between 4 sites) for middle school ($40,000 annual salary, with $10,000 included in this request):

- GWK: $10,000 per year

6. The remaining funding will be used to cover additional wages for community partners leading programming at each site, summer staffing, and existing program coordinator salaries not already covered by existing funding.

- CLE: $23,400

- RVE: $25,400

- GWK: $43,800

Personnel Site Totals Year 1:

CLE, RVE: $63,000 per site

GWK: $82,600

 

Materials and Supplies ($36,520 Year 1) - Cost for materials will be 12.6% of the total grant budget. These funds will be used to leverage additional contributions from local partners and vendors. Material costs include supplies for academic and enrichment activities, literacy materials and books, technology resources, additional recreation equipment, family night refreshments and meals, admission for field trips, etc. All materials and equipment purchased with 21st CCLC funds will be documented with complete detail and an inventory created for each site. Materials and supplies costs per site per year are calculated as follows:

- CLE, RVE: Student program ($10,000) + family literacy ($500) = $10,500 per site

- GWK: Student program ($15,000) + family literacy ($520) = $15,520

Other ($2,000 Year 1) – Other program costs include lunches or snacks for students on field trips and staff mileage. Other program costs per site per year are calculated as follows:

- CLE, RVE: $500 per site

- GWK: $1,000

 

Professional Development ($14,500 Year 1) - Research shows that the development of relationships between school-day staff and students is the most important school-related factor that influences student achievement. To develop the skills and abilities of staff, CBCSD has budgeted 5% of total grant funds for professional development opportunities and experiences at the local, state, and federal levels. “Personnel” professional development funds will be used to provide these opportunities for staff, club leaders and assistants, teachers, and community partners leading 21st CCLC programming. “Contracted services” funds will be used to host speakers and seminars or conferences (e.g., Conscious Discipline contractor). “Materials and supplies” professional development funds will be used for printed materials and other supplies needed to facilitate the professional development events.

- CLE, RVE: Personnel ($1,300) + contracted services ($2,000) + materials and supplies ($1,000) = $4,300 per site

- GWK: Personnel ($1,900) + contracted services ($3,000) + materials and supplies ($1,000) = $5,900

 

Student Access ($12,700 Year 1) - It is imperative to program success to ensure all students have safe and adequate transportation and accessibility to and from activities on the school campus and at off-site enrichment activities or trips. Transportation will include funding for a daily late bus serving CLE, RVE, and GWK attendance areas and at least four off-site field trips per semester. Transportation will also include funding for summer school programming. There are 19 regular education and 17 special education buses currently serving the student population in each school. This demonstrates a significant need if a large percentage of students participate in 21st CCLC programs at these proposed sites. Therefore, CBCSD has allocated 4.4% of the budget to transportation, with the following breakdown per site per year:

- CLE, RVE: $3,400 per site

- GWK: $5,900

 

Evaluation ($4,080) – CBCSD has budgeted 1.4% of total grant funds for the lead evaluator, Dr. Sherry Huffman, to conduct a comprehensive, rigorous evaluation that exceeds 21st CCLC requirements. Dr. Huffman will also provide 21st CCLC staff with training on any new assessment system that the state may adopt, utilize achievement data to ensure individualized students supports and school-day alignment, in addition to other continuous improvement duties. Note that staff anticipate a higher cost at GWK, as this will be a revitalized program and therefore may require more of the evaluator’s time than the proposed continuations at CLE and RVE. Evaluation costs per site per year are as follows:

- CLE, RVE: $860 per site

- RVE: $860

- GWK: $2,360

 

Other Administrative Costs ($11,600) - The program will serve a combined 230 regular attendees (425 total participants) at three schools, and CBCSD has budgeted within the allowable percentage of administrative cost per grant requirements. CBCSD is requesting 4% of the total grant funds to support administrative costs and ensure that all participants have a high-quality experience. The administrative expenses incurred by the CBCSD and 21stCCLC program sites will include staff preparation time, marking attendance, office space and utilities, maintenance, office supplies, phone service, computer usage, district human resources management (payroll, interview scheduling, background checks, etc.), organizing transportation, technology support, and other services. Administrative costs per site per year are as follows:

- CLE, RVE: $3,440 per site

- GWK: $4,720

 

Partner Contributions - ($466,250) includes estimated district contributions for time and effort of staff who support these sites, including the program director, the assistant director, and the portion of the coordinators not supported by grant funding; the contribution of the Council Bluff School Foundation for Kids & Company staff and associated benefits, and the in-kind personnel value of the community partners, as detailed in the Sustainability Planattachment and MOUs. This category also includes the estimated value of office space (including spaces used by each site facilitator in the proposed schools), technology, connectivity, in-kind supplies, and materials from the district.

Supplemental Materials

View Document

Before School (BS) Site Operations

Estimated Start Date:

September 1, 2022

Estimated End Date:

May 31, 2023

Total Number of Service Days:

160

Total hours of Before School services per typical week:

7.1

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

7:30

7:30

7:30

7:30

7:30

8:55

8:55

8:55

8:55

8:55

1.42

1.42

1.42

1.42

1.42

Saturday

NA

NA

0

After School (AS) Site Operations

Total hours of After School services per typical week:

12.92

Total Number of Service Days:

160

Estimated End Date:

May 31, 2022

Estimated Start Date:

September 1, 2022

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

2:05

3:45

3:45

3:45

3:45

6:00

6:00

6:00

6:00

6:00

3.92

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

Saturday

NA

NA

0

Summer (SUM) Site Operations

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

8:30

8:30

8:30

8:30

8:30

3:00

3:00

3:00

3:00

3:00

6.5

6.5

6.5

6.5

6.5

Saturday

NA

NA

0

Estimated Start Date:

June 7, 2022

Estimated End Date:

July 23, 2022

Total Number of Service Days:

30

Total hours of Summer services per typical week:

32.5

Adult Family Member Services

All 21CCLC programs are required to host a minimum of four family-centered events each year. A general rule of thumb is one per quarter. Examples of events include back-to-school celebrations, literacy nights, family game nights, recreational events, guest speakers, and so on. 

Describe Frequency, Duration, and Dosage:

Quarterly (minimum) family engagement events will include literacy workshops with the public library, sessions offered by Iowa Western Community College to provide adult education resources, open houses, back-to-school nights, and student showcases. CBCSD is also planning a family event in collaboration with the local Boys & Girls Clubs to reach more families and encourage more participation. CBCSD and Boys & Girls Clubs anticipate hosting one outdoor vendor fair per semester with family activities and partner booths (e.g., Iowa Western with adult literacy information), utilizing Boys & Girls Clubs’ ample outdoor space. Snacks/meals will be provided at family engagement events.

Estimated Total Number of Adult Family Members Served:*
Total Number of Family Events*
School Name

Carter Lake Elementary

4

50

Roosevelt Elementary

4

50

Gerald W. Kirn Middle School

4

50

Form D1: 21CCLC Application Funding Request Summary
 

21CCLC TOTAL FUNDING REQUEST 

(Before and/or After School and Summer Program Funds) 

3

Number of program sites included in this application:

230

Total number of students being served (all sites for one year):

290000

Total first-year funding request (all sites):

Total three-year funding request (all sites):

870000

FUNDING FOR EACH SITE INCLUDED IN THIS APPLICATION 

NOTE: A program site may serve students from many schools. For example, a location that serves students from three (3) different schools would be considered one Program Site. 

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

Carter Lake Elementary

80000

80000

80000

240000

50

Roosevelt Elementary

80000

80000

80000

240000

50

Gerald W. Kirn Middle School

112000

112000

112000

336000

70

School Year

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

Carter Lake Elementary

6000

6000

6000

18000

20

Roosevelt Elementary

6000

6000

6000

18000

20

Gerald W. Kirn Middle School

6000

6000

6000

18000

20

Summer School

Form D4: Applicant Agency’s Fiscal Resource Information 

It is recommended that each applicant, including school districts, public entities, or government agencies, possess sufficient fiscal resources in order to start up and operate the program being requested for a period of up to three months. Please indicate if you are a public entity or a private/non-profit by checking the appropriate box below and then use the text box at the bottom of the page to answer the questions regarding fiscal resources for start-up costs and operational costs. 

Public Entity

In the textbox below, please describe your funding sources that can be used to start up and operate the program for up to three months. For example, public entities should include their budget line item number, account numbers, or any other applicable references. Private organizations should describe cash, lines of credit, emergency loans, etc. Fiscal resource information should be specific (e.g., bank or lender names; name of the holder of the account).

 

* Note: If you do not have the financial resources available equal to the amount of funding you are requesting, you do not have the financial capacity for this project. Agencies that do not have adequate fiscal resources on hand are eligible to participate in the application process. However, the applicant must describe in this section the agency’s plan to secure the necessary fiscal resources for this program application. 

CBCSD can use district general operating funds to start up and operate the program for up to three months.

To view Forms D2 and D3, click the "View Document" buttons below. PDF versions are included at the end of this document but the information may not be split into multiple pages. 
 

Basic Service Components

If location for the program is different from the school where children attend, list both below:

Roosevelt Elementary School

School or Site/Building Name:

Carter Lake Elementary School

School or Site/Building Name:

Gerald W. Kirn Middle School

School or Site/Building Name:
Do you plan to provide any of the following to meet the nutrition/food access needs of students?

Snack (required by federal statute)

Do you plan to follow best practices?

Yes, we will provide a free program to at-risk students in poverty as outlined in the guidance and consistent with the priority description in the application. All students on FRPL will attend for free. Best Practice is that applicants serve a minimum of 50% of FRPL children at each school in the application to receive the bonus points.

 
 

Site Information 

2022-2025 Site Profile 

Council Bluffs Community School District

School/Agency Name:

School Name
(can apply for up to 3 sites) 
School-Wide Information 

Grades Served by School 

Total Enrollment 

Free and Reduced Lunch Rate 

# Targeted Students 

Grades Served by Program 

BS

AS

SUM

Target Schools

Carter Lake Elementary

PK-5

346

83.8

K-5

10

40

20

Roosevelt Elementary

PK-5

409

74.1

K-5

10

40

20

Gerald W. Kirn Middle School

6-8

1029

53.1

6-8

15

55

20

Total:

35

135

60