Burlington Community School District

Application Information

Applicant Serving as Fiscal Agent (Applicant Agency):

Burlington Community School District

County:

Des Moines

Amount Requested:

$193,800

Director of Agency:

Contact Name:

Patrick Coen

Agency Name:

Burlington Community School District

Phone:

3197536791

Fax:

Email:

Grant Contact/Project Director: 

These fields will appear blank of the previous question was answered "Yes" and the Grant Contact/Project Director is the same as the Director of Agency. 

Contact Name:

Cassie Gerst

Agency Name:

Burlington Community School District

Phone:

3197536791

Fax:

Email:

DUNS Number:

0793349980000

Is the Grant Contact/Project Director the same contact as the Director of Agency?

No

1429 West Avenue, Burlington 52601

Address:

1429 West Avenue, Burlington 52601

Address:

Data Collection and Evaluation Contact:

Contact Name:

Miriam Landsman, PhD

Phone:

3193351257

Fax:

Email:

226 North Hall, Iowa City 52242

Address:

Fiscal Contact:

Contact Name:

Greg Reynolds

Phone:

(319)753-6791

Fax:

Email:

1429 West Avenue, Burlington 52601

Address:

Iowa 21st Century Community Learning Centers Request for Applications FY22

Past Grantee Supplemental Application Information

Have you ever been in non-compliance (received a letter notice from Iowa Department of Education stating non-compliance) with 21CCLC rules and regulations in the past three years? 

No

Did you meet your attendance goals for the past two years? (21CCLC funded sites are required to meet their attendance goals at a rate of 70% in year one and 80% by year three)

Yes

Please provide your enrollment numbers for the last three years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

2017-2018: 1087
2018-2019: 759
2019-2020: 481
2020-2021: 318 (COVID Impact)

Please provide your average daily attendance for the last threes years of your previous 21CCLC grant.

2017-2018: 505
2018-2019: 218
2019-2020: 292
2020-2021: 134 (COVID Impact)

Did you meet your academic goals for the past two years?

Yes

How many of your local evaluation goals did you meet over the past two years?

75%

How much have office referrals been reduced over the past five years of your grant?

Over 75%

After 5 years, how many community partners for sustainability have been recruited?

More than 25

Have you exceeded the snack requirement, by providing a full meal?

No

Have you participated in required committee work in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

Have you attended required Professional Development in the last year? Attended:

All Meetings

How many parent engagement meetings did you have in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

2

How many field trips did you provide in the last year of your most recent 21CCLC Grant?

1

Have you provided children with the required snack?

Yes

Are you charging program fees to families?

No

Form Documentation

Legal Status of Applicant
Request for Competitive Priority
Minority Impact Statement
Private School Consultation Meeting Log
Sustainability Plan
Past Grantee Sustainability Form (if applicable)
Community Partner Official Notice
View Document
Assurances & Agreements Required of All Applicants
Collaborative Signatures

MOUs

Applicants were required to upload at least 5 and up to 10 MOUs. Not all buttons below will have an MOU attached. 

MOU Upload 1
MOU Upload 2
 MOU Upload 3
MOU Upload 4
MOU Upload 5
MOU Upload 6
MOU Upload 7
MOU Upload 8
MOU Upload 9
MOU Upload 10

Proposal Narrative

Abstract (Not scored)

The number of students served:

170

The total amount requested per year:

$193,800

The total amount per student:

$1,140

Partners In Education, Community Educating Students (PIECES) is a joint application by the Burlington Community School District (BCSD), the Burlington Public Library and Des Moines County Conservation with BCSD as the lead organization and fiscal agent for the grant. PIECES is currently serving BCSD students and families in six school sites funded by two 21st Century Community Learning Center (21CCLC) grants, District funding, and local foundations and donors. We are submitting this grant application in order to assist us in funding two of the PIECES program sites for an additional five year period following the conclusion of a five year 21st Century Community Learning Center grant. James Wilson Grimes Elementary (Grimes) and Sunnyside Elementary were part of Cohort 12 which ends its five year grant cycle on June 30, 2022.

 

Under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), BCSD is Title I eligible and meet the Free and Reduced Lunch (FRL) rate requirements for this grant application. Utilizing the most recent data for Iowa School Performance and FRL data, both building sites in this proposal meet the grant requirements. Grimes has a Free and Reduced Lunch rate of 72.51% for the 2020-2021 school year, and rates as Comprehensive Year 2 on the 2020 overall accountability index score. Sunnyside has a Free and Reduced Lunch rate of 50.59% for the 2020-2021 school year and rates as Comprehensive Year 2 on the 2020 overall accountability index score. Both sites have socioeconomic concerns, academic achievement gaps, and low College and Career Readiness rates.

 

The academic challenges that our students face are intensified by above average levels of poverty, substance use, delinquency, a lack of employment opportunity and single parent households within the community. Teachers and our students must confront the effects of major social issues on a daily basis. Students often cannot obtain academic assistance from their parents and need outside supports. In order to succeed, students must stay motivated, engaged, and focused. Caring staff must consistently build relationships with students while addressing the additional needs of our minority and impoverished students in both academic and enrichment activities.

 

PIECES programming provides students with sixty hours each month of enrichment activities targeted through: 1) academic assistance to help close the achievement gap; 2) academic enrichment including tutoring in core academic subjects with hands-on activities; 3) access to community resources and programming including environmental education through Des Moines County Conservation, extended library hours through Burlington Public Library; and 4) literacy and related educational services for families of PIECES students through Southeastern Community College. Community partnerships ensure that our students and families are exposed to a wide array of enrichment activities while introducing PIECES participants to new interests, hobbies, and career paths through our documented partnerships.

 

Partnerships with Burlington Police Department, Eagle View Community Health System, Alcohol Drug Dependency Services, ISUEO, SCC, Community Action of SE Iowa, the Art Center and Capitol Theater, both Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts of America and many more included in our letters of support and/or MOUs allow BCSD to incorporate community resources and programming into the lives of our students and families who may otherwise not have access to them. The joint applicants in this grant application propose to meet the enrichment activities outlined above, but also to sustain PIECES beyond the requirements of the grant. As indicated in the name of our after school initiative, PIECES is a collaborative of Partners in Educationwhereby our Community and school Educate our Students.

 

PIECES collaborative not only provides educational opportunities and enhancements to our school-day learning, but also partner to sustain programming beyond the length of the funding. The PIECES Advisory Council meets monthly to discuss program achievements, progress made toward meeting our objectives, student participation, as well as the capacity of the partnership to last beyond the grant. The Advisory Council and PIECES partners agreed to support the PIECES programming at both sites beyond the first five years but also requested this application to supplement funding provided at the sites. As included in the sustainability section of this grant application, PIECES is able to continue without the 21CCLC funding for another five years at Grimes and Sunnyside but with reduced student contact time. Both elementary schools are able to continue PIECES afterschool program for twenty students, two days a week, with parents providing transportation. The supplement of the 21st Century Community Learning Center grant will provide funding which will allow BCSD and its partners to serve an additional 170 students, five nights a week for two and a half hours each night during the school days, with student participation in field trips and partner activities on non-school days and Saturdays. The grant funding would also allow us to provide transportation home for students after the program ends which is a crucial element for students receiving free and reduced lunch participation and our working families.

 

PIECES Grimes and Sunnyside sites that are written into this application propose to serve a minimum of 170 students for 152 days. Students will participate in PIECES programming throughout the school year in the BCSD after school program and participate in our partner’s programming during non-school days and breaks through this grant application. BCSD’s grant application requests $193,800 per year for the PIECES after school program at Grimes and Sunnyside Elementary schools.


Burlington has a tremendous need for the 21stCentury Community Learning Center grant. The District’s current PIECES program model at Grimes and Sunnyside Elementary has increased student proficiency in reading and math as recorded by the ISASP and FAST scores over the past five years. School day teachers report students who regularly attend PIECES as improving in student 


behaviors, improving homework completion and reducing days absent from school. The 2021-2022 school year is the final year of a five year 21st Century Community Learning Center grant for the two proposed sites. While our students have seen academic improvements in math and reading, two areas for improvement are the College and Career Readiness of our students and STEM-related proficiency. This will be a focus area for PIECES over the next several years. If awarded the 21CCLC grant, PIECES programming at our two proposed sites will dramatically improve student and family access to enrichment activities with goals of: 1) reducing the academic achievement gap; 2) improving student behaviors; and 3) creating additional protective factors into the lives of our students which can increase our student’s ability to be resilient despite their environmental stressors.

Student Needs Assessments (20 possible points) 

2.1 BCSD has an enrollment of 3,191 students (2020 Iowa Public Schools SRI Spring data). K-4 elementary schools Grimes and Sunnyside are the sites selected for this grant application. 382 students attend Grimes and 255 students are at Sunnyside. This grant application proposes to serve a minimum of 85 students at each site representing 23% of Grimes and 33% of Sunnyside students. Below is the research done on student need including Title and ESSA accountability status, evidence of student need through objective data including assessments in poverty, student needs, and achievement gaps.

 

BCSD’s needs assessment focused on our school data, student demographics, and risk factors. The data we focused on included the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s 2020 County Health Rankings and Roadmaps, identified at-risk students based on academic failure, average daily attendance, free and reduced lunch eligibility, and student and family living situations including homeless students.

 

The County Health Rankings compares the health of counties in the US to others within its own state. Burlington, located in Des Moines County (DMC), represents 64% of the county population. We examine the main population of Burlington where the residents of the county have high levels of poverty, single parent households, and basic insecurities in housing and food. DMC is ranked 95 out of 99 Iowa Counties for Quality of Life, 98 out of 99 in Health Behaviors and 97 out of 99 in Social & Economic Factors. Residents of DMC, have an 84% graduation rate (compared to the state average at 91%); 42% children in single-parent homes (compared to the state average at 29%); and have 518 reported violent crime incidents compared to the state average at 282. DMC has 21.2% of children living in poverty (compared to the state average at 14%), have 34 reported teen births (compared to the state average at 19), and have high reports of sexually transmitted infections at 621.6 compared to the state at 441.6. Families have fewer access to exercise opportunities with 76% access compared to the state average at 83%. The data shows the need for after school care that is affordable (or free), and a program that would address resources for families. Other than PIECES, there is one fee-based after school care program provided by the Burlington YMCA, costing $96 per 5 days of attendance which equates to $384 per month. The cost of the YMCA program is a deterrent to many of our families.

 

Over the past five years we have surveyed families annually and they report 70% of the students attend our program because they want to and 30% because their parents request they are there due to working families or needing a safe after school environment. Parents report the program allows their children to have additional social skill development, opportunities to participate in community projects they normally would not, and the program keeps their child safe when they are working (source: BCSD Parent Survey data, 2020 and 2021).

 

BCSD students and families face hurdles requiring dedication to create change. Some parents report their families face housing insecurity, making them eligible for the McKinney Vento Act. Over the past five years, eight percent of the students attending PIECES are eligible for homeless support through McKinney Vento. Housing insecurity relates to food insecurity, numerous school changes, falling behind academically and health needs. Parents, the BCSD Homeless Liaison, and the DMC DHS Supervisor report the program assists families with the consistency the students need during after school hours and additional academic support.

 

Due to COVID-19, the accountability index score, rating category and ESSA support status were carried over from 2019 to the 2020 report in the Iowa School Performance measures (Iowa DOE, 2021). The data below is from the carryover reports but we also supplemented the results with our internal K-6 FAST reading scores and the K-6 iReady Math Diagnostic scores, providing the most accurate assessment of student academic needs and academic gaps.

Grimes has a 72.51% FRL rate, 14.2% of its students are on an Individual Education Program (IEP), and a high minority population representing 40% of the student body. Sunnyside has a 50.59% FRL rate, 18.3% of students on an IEP, and 35.7% of the student population are minorities. While both sites have socioeconomic concerns, they also have high academic achievement gaps, lower Average Daily Attendance rates and low College and Career Ready scores. The paragraph below reports the 2020 (2019 carry over) needs of each school’s students as reported by the Iowa DOE and the School Performance Report:

 

Grimes had an ESSA Support performance score of Comprehensive Year 2 with a Targeted Status of Met. The overall score was 53.4 compared to the state average of 54.94. The index points by subcategory indicate the students on FRL had a score of 51.09 and the IEP students at 44.61. Our minority students had 62% proficient in English language arts (compared to 81% for white students) and a 37% proficiency in Math (compared to 74% for white students). The students with disabilities (IEP) showed a higher achievement gap with only 28% proficient in English Language Arts (compared with 74% for non-IEP students) and a 35% proficiency in Math (compared to 63% of non-IEP students). During this same time period, PIECES served an average of 10% IEP students, 65% FRL lunch students and 49% of minority students. Thus, we are serving the Grimes students who need the additional support and after school hour enrichment in high amounts while addressing the academic gaps found in the specific subgroups.

 

Sunnyside had an ESSA Support performance score of Comprehensive Year 2 with a Targeted Status of Not-Met. The overall score was 49.08 compared to the state average of 54.94. The index points by subcategory indicate the students on FRL had a score of 47.58 


and the IEP students at 21.62. Our minority students scored 33.33 in English Language (compared to 68.75 for White students), and 35.42 in Math (compared to 56.25 for White students). The score for students with disabilities (IEP) was significant with only 21.62% proficient in English and 21.62% proficient in Math. During this same time period, the PIECES demographics indicated 58% of our Sunnyside PIECES students were FRL eligible, 15% received IEP services, and 44% were minorities of which 40% were self-identified as Black. While the program is open to all students, knowing we are serving students most in need from student poverty (FRL), working families, minority students, and those with special disabilities (IEP) will not only drive our curriculum and activity selection but also provide the additional support the subgroups need.

 

Grimes and Sunnyside report needs in the area of Science proficiency, Grimes had an overall index score of 55.32 (57.06 score for State average). Grimes’s subgroups report a score of 50 for FRL students, 50 for minority students, and 50 for IEP students. Sunnyside had an overall index score of 34.43 in Science (57.06 score for State average). Sunnyside’s subgroups report a score of 19.05 for FRL students, 6.25 for Black students and 45.45 for multi-race students, and 27.27 for IEP students. Sunnyside had a greater achievement gap than Grimes but both sites can benefit from a STEM-focused curriculum and additional enrichment in this area.

 

Due to COVID-19, BCSD also reviewed the FAST reading and iReady Math diagnostic data and trends. From the fall of 2018 to the winter of 2021, the FAST Reading scores K-6 went from 51% proficiency to 43% proficiency. The important first grade year showed only 27% at benchmark in the winter of 2021 and 38% of second graders at benchmark. The iReady Math scores indicated our at-risk students increased from 23% in winter of 2020 to 28% in winter of 2021. Reviewing the most recent data allows us to create dynamic after school programming concentrating on student needs where the largest gaps can be found.

 

The PIECES program increases student success, achievement, and reduces juvenile delinquency by providing a safe and structured learning environment. Research by the Center for Safe Schools found engaging students in activities and service projects that reinforce social justice themes and peace-making skills help students feel safe and develop social skills. Staff and volunteers of PIECES include these activities into programming.

 

To ensure all students have access to PIECES, transportation is an important programmatic element. The district’s partnership with the City of Burlington allows us to use city bussing where our school transportation department cannot. The BCSD transportation department and the City of Burlington will work together to ensure all students have safe and accessible transportation to and from PIECES when needed.

 

School District Improvement Plans: BCSD has a Comprehensive School Improvement Plan (CSIP) including the implementation of afterschool and extended day learning opportunities for students. BCSD’s major academic needs identified in the CSIP include improvements in math and reading as well as improving the dropout rate. Each of these identified needs are addressed in the PIECES program and included in our grant objectives. Teacher Leaders in the elementary level are working with teachers on math and reading initiatives supporting a multi-tiered system of supports. The reading and math trained teacher leaders provide professional development to our PIECES staff and will provide support in helping PIECES students with specifically designed intervention strategies. As math and reading are our two highest areas of student need, PIECES and BCSD staff ensure this process occurs throughout BCSD and PIECES proposed schools.

 

BCSD’s School Improvement Advisory Committee (SIAC) reviews the needs assessment information, Student and Parent Surveys, and the CSIP and helps to develop areas of change. The SIAC has representation from all stakeholder groups as they are the people impacted by our goals and we encourage them to have a voice on how we meet them. SIAC, PIECES Advisory Council, the BCSD Administration team, and the PIECES Local Evaluator review the District’s School Improvement Plan and work to create and monitor the PIECES grant goals and objectives. The school day and extended day learning communities combine efforts to increase the percent of students who are proficient in math and reading, improve school engagement to offset the dropout rates, and ensure students are building relationships with staff.

 

2.2 Various community organizations collaborated with BCSD and the grant partners to identify the needs of our students and families while also supporting the need for PIECES to expand and continue throughout our district. The organizations that collect and analyze external qualitative data that reflect the needs of youth and families in DMC and the city of Burlington were consulted and instrumental to the development of this application. Among those contributing data and support for PIECES grant application include the Burlington Police Department, DMC Public Health, ISUEO, Community Action of SE Iowa, Southeastern Community College, SIAC, PIECES Parents, PIECES partners, PIECES students, and the current PIECES Advisory Council. Each entity was contacted during the beginning stages of grant development, provided data for inclusion in the Needs Assessment, surveyed, and discussed the expansion criteria for the PIECES program involved in this application.

Project (24 possible points) 

3.1 PIECES after school programming will positively impact academically challenged students, specifically target risk factors facing our students, and improve family literacy and engagement. The broad goal for PIECES is that youth will behave as positive, contributing members within the social, environmental, and economic fabric of their communities and school. Through targeted instruction and enrichment activities, students will improve reading and math proficiency; increase school attendance; and reduce disruptive classroom behaviors resulting in office disciplinary referrals and suspensions. Based on the student needs assessment, the paragraph below details the PIECES program components that are in place and proposed.

 


Needs Assessment Area: Academic Challenges

· Educational enrichment activities including hands-on activities that focus on reading and math instruction, aligns with the Iowa Core and 21st Century standards, while introducing career exploration.

· All academic enrichment activities to take the Three-Point Approach of learn the material during school day instruction, experience the subject matter through hands-on applications and enrichments, and reinforce the material through applications of the subject content with staff or community partner-led activities.

· Educational activities for students to engage in STEM; Art; Physical Fitness; and Music.

· Individual tutoring and homework help provided by volunteers to reduce achievement gaps for at-risk students.

 

Needs Assessment Area: Poverty and Risk Factors

· Character and Behavioral Education programing including Conscious Discipline® classrooms.

· Reinforce BCSD’s Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports (PBIS) program.

· Drug and Violence Prevention Programming provided by PIECES partners.

· Consistent, caring, and nurturing staff and volunteers.

· Saturday programming by community partners targeting PIECES students and families.

 

Needs Assessment Area: Family Resources and Support

· Parent involvement and engagement events with resources available from community agencies.

· Family Literacy activities provided through Southeastern Community College (SCC).

· Family access to adult literacy and HiSET programs through SCC.

 

Curriculum to Meet Academic Needs: We utilize MindWorks Resources curriculum which is hands-on, interactive, educational materials that engage students in multi-sensory learning experiences. The curriculum is designed on brain-based learning, the 21st Century standards framework, and best practices in education. The curriculum is theme-based for nine weeks of academic enrichment. Each theme consists of twelve language arts, twelve science, and twelve math activities complete with facilitator guides and materials necessary for successful implementation. Language and literacy is the primary focus and uses age-appropriate language, vocabulary, and context within each activity. Each lesson connects a career pathway to the activity the students are working on. STEAM and STEM-infused content incorporates learning through inquiry, reasoning, and content from science, technology, engineering, art, and math. Social emotional learning throughout provide opportunities to promote self-management, self-awareness, social awareness, and responsible decision-making. The lessons are aligned with the National Core Curriculum in Math and Reading and Next Generation Science Standards. Students participate in the lessons through collaboration, critical thinking, creativity and positive communication.

 

Skillastics® is physical activity curriculum that integrates academic and nutritional concepts into an innovative circuit training game. Sites have Skillastics® activity kits in fitness, nutrition, character education, grade specific math, and STEM. Additional curriculum selected include, Girls Who Code clubs, ISUEO’s Youth Marketplace entrepreneurship curriculum and Skillastics Yoga and Cup Stacking clubs. Hand2Mind manipulative kits were provided to PIECES through the STEM Scale-Up program grant and include the Differentiated Math Centers and STEM in Action kits. All above curriculum including the Hand2Mind kits are to be used in the continuation of this grant application with our PIECES Sunnyside and Grimes sites.

 

3.2 PIECES Program Activities Overview: Targeted instruction and enrichment activities take place during the after school program and select weekends at both sites. All PIECES activities adhere to the Common Elements of Quality Before & After School Programs as outlined on the Educate Iowa website. PIECES follows the Iowa Afterschool Alliance’s Standards and Corresponding Indicators as outlined on the Iowa Afterschool Alliance’s website. PIECES students participate in: 1) Flexible grouping to allow for student’s individual learning styles and needs to be met; 2) One on one and small group tutoring; 3) Activities targeting STEM components; 4) Math and Literacy focused enrichment activities; 5) Recreational activities including physical fitness and healthy lifestyle education; and 6) Targeted enrichments in the area of College & Career Readiness.

 

Grimes and Sunnyside’s targeted instruction begins immediately after school dismisses for two and a half hours each night Monday through Friday for approximately 152 days. This results in 50 hours of student programming each month. Saturday’s total 10 additional hours of student programming occur at our joint applicant’s locations. Saturday’s include the Burlington Library STEM programming, Starr’s Cave Nature Center’s environmental enrichment, and the Art Center/Capitol Theater’s enrichment in the arts.

 

The first thirty minutes of PIECES program time incorporates Conscious Discipline® Brain Smart Starts®, Character Education in social skill development, and homework help. Conscious Discipline® is a multi-disciplinary approach to student behavior. Our first year of implementation we saw a reduction of office referrals during program hours of 89.5%. Conscious Discipline recognizes three basic brain/body/mind states likely to produce certain student behaviors. It then incorporates teacher-led intentional and state-specific responses which enable students to access advanced skills. The seven powers of Conscious Discipline adults create a shift in the way adults see conflict so that we can maintain composure and consciously respond to difficult situations. Adult’s ability to self-regulate is the precursor to teaching children social-emotional skills. In PIECES we create a School Family which increases connection between adults and students. Connection ensures optimal development and learning while the School Family culture is built through consistent modeling of routines, rituals and structures. We look at behaviors as issues that lead to teachable moments and then equips students with the social-emotional and communication skills needed to manage themselves, resolve conflict, and develop healthy behaviors. Our PIECES classrooms have calming corners, job boards for students, visual routines, and visual class agreements developed with the students, time machines for student to solve conflicts with other students, and composure strategies for students. We also create the School Family through kindness recording, wish well rituals, new student welcome rituals, and class chants and breathing rituals.

 


Physical fitness activities and a USDA approved snack occur during the next hour of program time. A healthy USDA National School Lunch Program approved snack is provided daily through BCSD’s food service department and served in the cafeteria. Physical activities include time on the recess equipment, in the gymnasium, and with either Go Noodle videos, the Learning Station videos, or pool noodle dance and/or desk drumming videos. MindWorks Resources (and section 3.1 curriculum selections) are utilized during the final 60 minutes of hands-on enrichment time. The student program time each day is designed to enhance cognitive abilities including, but not limited to: STEM focused instruction; music creation/listening; physical fitness; and art creation/education activities.

 

To ensure that each PIECES program meets a minimum requirement of 60 hours of contact time per month, we will provide the following activities outside of the above detailed times: 1) Friday Night Youth Night at the YMCA; 2) monthly Starr’s Cave field trips; and 3) weekly Public Library events including the 321 Club chapter book story time, Tween Technology Tuesdays, and Family Story Time. During each school break PIECES students will be able to participate in the YMCA Kid’s Gym, Public Library activities, the Art Center’s Art Club and Starr’s Cave Nature Center events. Each activity that takes place on a weekend will operate for at least three hours each day the program is offered. A healthy, USDA approved, nutritious snack or lunch will be provided at each activity or event.

 

3.3 Family Literacy/Engagement: Through a partnership with SCC and other joint applicants and partners, our parents and caregivers of PIECES students are offered Family Literacy/Engagement Nights on a quarterly basis and be tied into a theme or activity that PIECES students are engaging in during after school time. Family Literacy/Engagement Nights will support family involvement in the PIECES programming as well as provide instructional activities that support the parent’s role in helping their children advance in academic achievement. SCC will attend Family Literacy/Engagement events to teach parent reading strategies that can be used when reading with their children at home. The parents who participate in our family engagement events and activities report that they feel PIECES helps them have a greater role in their child’s education and to be more connected to their school. On average over the past five years, 70% of families who have children in the PIECES program have attended a family engagement event.

 

Our other program partners including Community Action of SE Iowa, Eagle View Community Health Systems, ADDS, Burlington Police Department, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, and IA State Extension and Outreach will also (and do) participate in our Family Engagement events to introduce families and students to other community resources. The partners offer programs such as healthy living, nutrition, Family Development and Self-Sufficiency (FaDSS), low-income home energy assistance programs, medical advocates, section 8 housing, disability programs, emergency rent assistance, and free job training.

 

SCC also will make available their Adult Literacy and Adult Education programming for the parents of PIECES students. SCC programs are targeted toward individuals who want to learn how to read or improve their reading skills. Adult Education classes at SCC provide instruction for adults who want to develop the skills necessary to seek or upgrade employment, earn a high school equivalency diploma, or enter a college or vocational training program. Group learning is offered in combination with self-paced instruction and may be supplemented with online educational activities.

 

3.4 PIECES program goals include meeting the Federal GPRA measurements as well as local objectives and goals. The federal GPRA measurements that will be set to measure BCSD PIECES program include: (Refer to Supplemental Attachment)

GPRA 1: percent of students in grades 4-8 who demonstrate a growth in reading/language arts on state assessments. Our goal is that 50% of students will show improvement in their reading/language art scores.

GPRA 3: Students in grades 1-8 will have at or above a 90% school day attendance rate during the school year.

GPRA 4: Our goal is that we will have a 25% reduction in in-school suspensions for students regularly attending our program.

GPRA 5: Our goal is that 70% of students will demonstrate an increase in teacher-reported engagement in learning.

Local objectives of the PIECES program for regularly attending students (30 days or more attendance) are:

Objective: 50% of students will show improvement in SEL development as reported on surveys from the start of the year to the close of the year.

Objective: Each site will provide a minimum of five enrichment activities provided by community partners as demonstrated through EZ Reports tracking documentation.

Objective: The number of community partners will be maintained from the grant application (and maintained on a yearly basis) as recorded by the Iowa Partner template submitted to the DOE each school year.

Objective: By May of 2023, 75% of parents will report greater involvement in their children’s education as measured by parent evaluation surveys on a yearly basis.

Objective: PIECES will provide a minimum of four family nights per school year that offer resources for improving parenting skills and/or family literacy.

 

3.5 Alignment with School Day. PIECES aligns with the district’s comprehensive school improvement plan (CSIP), SIAC recommendations, and superintendent’s goals for improved academic achievement. School day and PIECES academics are aligned with Iowa Core and 21stCentury Learning framework that include universal constructs; critical thinking, complex communication, creativity, collaboration, flexibility and adaptability, and productivity and accountability. There is continuity with the school day academics because school day staff work within the PIECES program, including teachers and Para educators at all proposed sites. Daily communication from day teachers to PIECES staff occur through student planners that the students bring to PIECES. Recorded in the student planners are notes about daily student progress in an effort to support skill enhancement and work completion. The PIECES Site Support Staff and Lead Program Coordinator will work flexible hours to build consistency from school day to afterschool checking in with students during the school day and then following up with school day teachers as needed.

 

3.6 Capacity and Experience of BCSD. BCSD has extensive experience managing federal, state, and local grant programs. BCSD’s 21st21CCLC Grant Supervisor has a Masters in Family and Consumer Sciences specializing in Positive Youth Development from Iowa State University, has been coordinating the current PIECES 21CCLC grant for seven years, and has 16 years of professional experience in out of school time programming. The PIECES program has been in BCSD for the past 10 years of which, the past 8 has been partially funded through a 21CCLC grant. BCSD possesses the financial, material and human resources necessary to fulfill this proposed PIECES project on time and within budget. PIECES Advisory Council and community partnerships provide volunteers, financial support, student and family activities, and advisory functions for the current and proposed program.

 

PIECES has been shown to be effective, utilizing the structure and curriculum mentioned in section 3.1 and above sections, in meeting student’s need over the past eight years. The 20-21 local evaluation report GPRA measures indicated that 89% of all regular program participants improved in math and 96% improved in English. This application is specific to elementary age students where our GPRA measures indicated that 92% of elementary students improved in math and 100% of our elementary students improved in English. The school day teacher GPRA measures indicated that 61% of elementary students who needed improvement in homework completion and class participation did improve. The school day teacher GPRA measures also indicated that 22% of students needing improvement in school behaviors improved by year end 2021. BCSD school data report a decrease in office disciplinary referrals over the past five years showing a 75% reduction from 16-17 to 20-21. Specifically for the two sites in this application; Grimes had a reduction of 83% and Sunnyside of 90%.

Research Base (5 possible points)  

The Harvard Family Research Project (HFRP) examined over a decade of out of school time (OST) research and evaluation studies and confirmed that children and youth who participate in after school programs can have numerous positive benefits in the areas of academics, social/emotional, prevention, and health and wellness (Little, Witmer, and Weiss, 2008, pg 2). They further stated that it is not only the additional extended learning opportunities that occur in OST programming but balancing the academic support with a variety of hands-on enrichment activities that are engaging, fun, and co-curricular in nature that promote youth development which supports and improves academic performance. The National Dropout Prevention Center/Network’s research agrees with HFRP’s findings that key strategies to prevent students from dropping out include afterschool and OST opportunities.

 

Research indicates that children from low socioeconomic households are at risk for slower academic skill development, low literacy skills due to their environment, and can be under resourced which can negatively affect student’s academic achievement (Morgan, Farkas, Hillemeier & Maczuga, 2009). Children living in poverty develop language skills more slowly, exhibit delayed letter recognition and phonological awareness and are at risk for reading difficulties (Aikens & Barbarin, 2008). The National Center for Education Statistics (2008) reported that in 2007, the high school dropout rate among persons 16-24 years of age was higher in low-income families than their higher income families. PIECES programming and extended day environment is designed to provide additional interventions into the lives of the most at-risk students to assist in their known academic gaps.

 

In creating and implementing BCSD’s PIECES programs, we consulted our stakeholders and made program quality decisions based on the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance’s (NCEE) Institute of Education Sciences, “Structuring Out-of-School Time to Improve Academic Achievement” practice guide. The IES practice guide states that, “Academically oriented OST programs are promising because students spend twice as much of their waking hours outside of the classroom as in it. OST periods, especially summer breaks, are the times when the achievement gap widens.” (Beckett, Borman, et al., 2009-012, page 5). The practice guide also offers five recommendations to improve OST programs in order to maximize the benefit to students academically. Five recommendations PIECES institutes are: 1) connecting PIECES programs with school and classroom activities to improve academic performance; 2) focus on recruiting and retaining targeted students so that they receive the dosage necessary to realize academic benefits; 3) adapt instruction to individual and small group needs; 4) provide engaging learning experiences; and 5) access program performance and use the results to improve the quality of the program.

 

The hours after the school day ends (3:00 – 6:00 pm) offer youth opportunities for juvenile crime, sexual activity, and risky behaviors such as drug and alcohol use. Burlington Police Department found a disproportionate number of minorities over represented within the juvenile detention centers and found minorities experience greater recidivism within the system than their white peers (Major Darren Grimshaw interview, 2016). Research and evaluations studies have shown that participation in OST programming has a positive impact on juvenile crime and help reduces risk factors that contribute to teenage pregnancy, teen sexual activity, and boys marijuana use (Goldschmidt, Huang, & Chinen, 2007). PIECES programming takes place during those important afterschool hours and will involve activity and relationship building opportunities for our students with Burlington Police Department, our BPD School Resource Officers, community prevention and treatment specialists, and community adult volunteers.

Management and Sustainability Plan (20 points) 

5.1 According to Little, Wimer, and Weiss (2008), the quality of program staff is one of the most critical features of an afterschool program. PIECES recruitment focuses on first hiring teachers with certification/experience within the targeted instruction areas and secondly on hiring teachers within the buildings that are housing the PIECES programs. To retain quality teachers, support staff, and after school staff program leadership provide appropriate compensation, high quality professional development, and valuable support within the school and district. The K-8 Site Coordinator is responsible for recruiting, hiring, and retaining program staff. Flexible scheduling for Site Coordinator is utilized to ensure suitable communication between day and afterschool programming. Throughout the eight years of DOE funding for the PIECES program we have retained 72% of our staff from year to year. The Grimes site has retained 83% of PIECES staff over the past five years and Sunnyside has retained 75% of staff.

 

PIECES volunteer roles include student tutoring, enrichment activity, supervision and support on field trips, or sharing experiences/expertise in an area of career or academic interest with students. The Greater Burlington Partnership, Burlington Kiwanis, Burlington Police Department, Harmony Bible Church, City Hope and BCSD’s retired teachers have a strong partnership with BCSD and PIECES. Retired teachers currently volunteer in each of the elementary sites to work one-on-one with students. All parties involved work together to ensure effective staffing and professional development for PIECES staff, alignment with building and district school day instruction, and coordinate volunteers to support high quality programming.

 

The DOE has provided 21CCCL grant sites with a Professional Development Plan template that recommends quality professional development training topics, along with recommendations and invitations to local or statewide training opportunities. The Grant Supervisor and Site Coordinator provide/arrange in-services for staff and volunteers to ensure consistency and continuity of programming that align with PIECES goals and objectives. PIECES staff participate in an enrollment orientation that includes visiting programs, a Conscious Discipline (CD) overview, and a handbook of expectations and policies. The start of the school year training includes resilience training on Developmental Assets, Developmental Relationships, CD and facilitation skills. Developmental Assets and Relationships are delivered by the Grant Supervisor who is certified by the Search Institute to train on their modules. CD training is initially provided by Loving Guidance Company and then coaching and follow up training is then led by the Grant Supervisor. Throughout the year program and staff evaluations are used to create a PD plan based on the staff needs.

 

Staff and volunteer handbooks are disseminated which clearly outline expectations and responsibilities. Opportunities for conferences will be considered for additional training along with training from the Iowa Afterschool Alliance, You for Youth’s free online afterschool professional development, and National Afterschool Alliance webinars. The Grant Supervisor provides volunteer training as well as PIECES staff training in the areas of developmental relationship formation and youth/adult partnerships.

 

The administration structure for PIECES begins with the Director of Curriculum who oversees the Grant Supervisor and school day education. The Supervisor oversees the 21CCLC Grant programs including budget management, data reporting, local evaluation support, EZ Report data management, DOE reporting, and community partnerships. The Supervisor collaborates with transportation, food service, human resources, and the business department to ensure sound fiscal management and DOE guidelines are adhered to. The Supervisor manages the K-8 Site Coordinator who in turn collaborates with building Principals and school day staff at each building being served to ensure quality program delivery and adherence to grant objectives and goals. The Site Coordinator is responsible for daily operations of the program along with coordination of activities with building’s staff, and volunteers. The Site Coordinator hires Site Support Staff who is extensively trained and practiced in CD and our program goals and objectives. The Support Staff and the site staff work together under the direction of the Site Coordinator to deliver a quality program under the guidance of the Grant Supervisor.

 

5.2 Accessible and safe transportation to and from PIECES programs is arranged with BCSD transportation department and City of Burlington bussing services. Student routes are designed with both parties according to the needs of the building, students and parents. Students who need specialized transportation services are provided those accommodations through the BCSD transportation department. BCSD’s transportation department and the city bus have daily contact with the Site Coordinators to communicate student’s daily transportation needs as well as behavioral or disciplinary problems on the buses. This communication style ensures students’ safety on the buses.

All program facilities, including transportation services, are ADA approved to ensure accessibility to all students, staff and volunteers. If needed, translation services will be provided during PIECES activities, family nights, and for transportation needs of students. All schools have up-to-date safety plans on file and evacuation routes posted in every room and common area. PIECES staff participate in annual emergency procedure training including medical emergency procedures and BCSD’s Crisis Plan. School day procedures are replicated during afterschool hours to ensure safe and consistent procedures for students and staff.

 

5.3 The PIECES Advisory Council was established ten years ago and has since evolved into a monthly meeting with key stakeholders involved in BCSD. The Advisory Council is made up of representatives from PIECES community partners, volunteers, parents, school staff, and PIECES staff. BCSD’s Director of Curriculum and Grant Supervisor meet with the Council during each monthly meeting and report on current grant objectives, participant attendance, family engagement activities, and programming activities. Site Coordinators and/or Building Principals present to the Advisory Council on a bi-monthly basis to inform them on site-specific programs, activities, challenges, and successes.

The Advisory Council has its own handbook which outlines expectations, roles, BCSD afterschool programming components, PIECES programming and goals, yearly PIECES evaluation reports, and sustainability planning. The Advisory Council is instrumental in maintaining the sustainability of the PIECES program beyond the 21CCLC grant funding.

 

Sustainability Plan. The Grant Supervisor and Site Coordinator guarantees the structure of the PIECES program will be maintained throughout each site. The data collection system (EZ Reports), volunteer coordination, student needs assessments, and program evaluations will continue beyond the three-year grant cycle and be able to be maintained into years four and five pending the approval of a comprehensive site visit by the Iowa DOE. Community partners provide enrichment and healthy activities, such as ISUEO, the Burlington Police Department, DMC Conservation, SCC, Burlington Public Library, ADDS, area businesses, civic groups and the city of Burlington. They remain engaged with the programming outside of specific 21CCLC funding streams. Ten years ago, the original PIECES program began with funding from the Burlington Kiwanis. Over the course of these years BCSD was awarded three 21CCLC grants, was financially sound through the 25% reduction in state DOE funding and has financially and programmatically supported a high school and middle school summer school program with local and district funding sources. The community partnerships established to operate the current and proposed PIECES program went from 12 to 27 to now over 42 community agencies providing in-kind activity programming for BCSD PIECES students.

 

STEM activities and healthy snacks will continue to be maintained after the 21CCLC grant ends. Additionally, academic awareness to close the achievement gap in reading and math will remain a strong focus beyond year five. Current programming has been in place for eight years and has provided enough growth to justify this request for another five years of 21CCLC funding. The financial and volunteer support of Kiwanis, Rotary, and Burlington’s Educational Foundation will continue to support the afterschool program beyond specific funding streams as well. In addition, the following businesses and organizations currently support the family literacy nights: Hy-Vee, SCC, Burlington Public Library, Iowa Workforce Development, and school Parent Teacher Organizations (PTO). BCSD provides several resources that are not funded through 21CCLC grant that support the infrastructure of the PIECES program and will continue with this grant proposal. These include building Administration positions, District Administration, building custodial staff, building secretaries, phone, computers, copy services, accounting services, and building space. These will be maintained regardless of external funding streams which contribute to the overall sustainability of the program.

 

5.4A Grimes and Sunnyside have been delivering the PIECES Program, funded partially through a 21CCLC grant, over the past five school years. PIECES programming has met all grant-specified requirements. Both building’s regular PIECES attendees have shown academic improvement on FAST and iReady scores in reading and math with increasing improvements year over year as evidenced by our local evaluations and trimester assessments. The GPRA measurements, discussed previously, have shown student improvements at both Grimes and Sunnyside in academic areas, student behaviors, and school functioning and participation.

 

To maintain program quality and ensure progress toward grant goals, the Grant Supervisor will work with both community partners and PIECES stakeholders on a quarterly basis. It is important that measuring grant objectives and goals does not happen once per year but on a continual basis. Academic goals will be monitored for student progress on a quarterly basis at each location with site specific staff and the Grant Supervisor. Under the supervision of the Director of Curriculum, Principals and the Grant Supervisor agree to examine student progress toward proficiency and ensure that afterschool curriculum and enrichment activities are aligning with the grant objectives and school day curriculum. The yearly local evaluation will be reviewed by all stakeholders including site Principals, Director of Curriculum, Student Advisory Councils, SIAC, and the PIECES Advisory Board. When planning yearly and monthly PIECES programming and activities, it is important that each building considers student progress, student needs, and program quality. Each of these progress monitoring meetings are important not only for the students’ progress, but also for sustaining the program beyond grant funding.

 

Continual partner support and collaboration is key to the success and sustainability of PIECES. As the name indicates, PIECES program is a collaboration of community and schools. The partnerships that PIECES have are vital to our program capacity and sustainability. The PIECES partners work collaboratively to provide students and their families’ enrichment activities which not only meet academic components but also connect the community and the school. Our partners provide activities, in-kind donations, staffing, building usage, and resources for our families. This joint application to expand our current PIECES program was created through the collaborative partnership with the understanding that the partnerships are key to our program success. When the funding decreases after three years, each of the partners has agreed to continue our programming while ensuring each can sustain beyond a reduction in funding. To offset the funding decline, BCSD will incorporate more community partners who can lead activities related to their own agency’s specialties.

 

5.4B PIECES is a collaborative of Partners in Education whereby our Community and school Educate our Students. PIECES partners not only provides educational opportunities and enhancements to our OST learning, but also partner to sustain programming beyond the length of the funding. Over the past five years, PIECES programming has been supplemented by the 21CCLC grant with other funding sources sustaining the program. The District allocates $63,429 per year in non-grant funded PIECES staffing and oversight, including a portion of the Grant Supervisor’s salary, student transportation, family engagement activities and portions of professional development. PIECES also has grown partnerships over the five years having had only 12 partners at the start of the grant to over 41 partners within the grant’s last year. The partnerships provided include partner-paid staff to lead PIECES student activities, volunteers for individual student mentoring and tutoring, in-kind donations for student and family events and activities, and program activities for our students within their business or organization. The added financial benefit of our community partners providing the above services and time correlate to over $101,431.24 per year that we would otherwise have to fund. Details of our community partner contributions can be found in the uploaded Sustainability Plan and Previous Sustainability Plan forms.

 

Community partners provide their own staff (non-grant funded) to lead activities at student and family programming. Prior to COVID-19, 55 volunteers/community partner staff led student and family activities equating to $43,136.24 in value to our program. That amount is equivalent to 12% of our annual 21CCLC funded personnel costs. The community partners and volunteers who lead student and family programming contribute to the program but do not staff our program. The partners help us to sustain our program and continue to do so over the grant cycle in this way. We also receive background checks on all the staff and volunteers through the Burlington Police Department or the community agency checks. That amount equates to $1,925 in value. We also received $9,200 in activity supplies through the STEM UP grant award in 2020 and an additional $30,000 from the Burlington Education Foundation to purchase MindWorks curriculum. These donations and grant awards help us to sustain the program with activity supplies that can be used multiple times throughout the years.

 

The PIECES Advisory Council is made up of volunteers from the community who are interested in our programming as well as advocating for our sustainability beyond the 21CCLC grant. The City of Burlington partnered with PIECES and offered free city bussing for students over the summer months who were attending summer feeding programs, a Public Library event, or going to the summer school activities.

Sustaining the PIECES program beyond the 21CCLC grant is vital for our BCSD students and families. Our students have many needs both socially, economically, and academically that would go unmet if the PIECES program was not available after school. The community and school district continues to grow the program each year along with the outside funding for continued program development, leadership, and student activities.

Communication Plan (5 possible points)

Partnerships (10 possible points) 

Partners In Education, Community Educating Students (PIECES) is a joint application by the Burlington Community School District (BCSD), the Burlington Public Library and Des Moines County Conservation with BCSD as the lead organization and fiscal agent for the grant. As our name implies, PIECES is about the partnerships between the school district and youth-serving community organizations. Each of the partners contributes resources, staffing, activities, supplies, and marketing for our extended day and summer programming. Each of the partners relies on the other for youth engagement, parent engagement, community support, and implementation of PIECES activities.

 

7.1 Existing Partnerships

PIECES currently has over 40 community partnerships that collaborate with the program to provide services for our families, activities for our students, staffing during PIECES programming, monthly educational programs for students, volunteers to work with students, and financial contributions. A complete list of our partners who contribute resources, supplies, and staffing for nightly PIECES program activities can be found in our local evaluations, the Sustainability Form upload, and through the MOUs and Letters of Support.

 

This application is submitted on behalf of three specific partnerships that will provide PIECES programming and family events. The MOU partnerships included in this application include: Burlington Police Department, The Burlington Public Library, Southeastern Community College, Des Moines County Conservation, Boy Scouts of America’s Mississippi Valley Council, Girl Scouts of Eastern Iowa and Western Illinois, Eagle View Community Health System, Community Action of SE Iowa, IA State Extension and Outreach, and the Art Center/Capitol Theater. The Burlington Public Library provides staffing, activities, and youth-focused events for students in grades K-12 at our PIECES program sites and through field trips to the Library. The Library offers our PIECES students weekly activities that are of no cost to BCSD or PIECES. The activity includes staffing by the Library, activity supplies, and youth leadership opportunities. Des Moines County Conservation provides activity programming for students, hands-on environmental education, field trip events, and family activities at no cost to the district or PIECES. Boy Scouts of America leads a Cub Scout troops that meets at our elementary programs and hired a staff person to coordinate these efforts. Boy Scouts provides volunteer leaders, activity supplies, parent engagement activities, and youth development programming at no cost to BCSD. The Art Center/Capitol Theater provides art enrichment in both arts and theater and provides movies to PIECES families one Saturday each month. Each partner’s MOU is uploaded into this online application.

 

Family programming and Adult literacy activities are essential elements to PIECES programming. Through our partnerships with the other MOU partner, Southeastern Community College, our families receive activities to engage them in the education of their children and with access to services that BCSD alone could not offer. Southeastern Community College (SCC), Community Action of SE Iowa, Burlington Public Library, Eagle View Health Systems, Boy Scouts of American and Des Moines County Conservation each add a family component of programming necessary to serve the whole child and family. Southeastern Community College's Adult Education and Literacy program has several components. SCC instructs in five subjects the skills needed to help students or adults earn a high school equivalency diploma. Some SCC students, who have earned a high school diploma, engage in study activities to upgrade their skills in order to become more employable or go into training for a career. SCC instructors offer small group and one-to-one instruction based on the needs of the student. They offer three on-line learning programs to help students who need distance learning to improve their skills or one -to-one tutoring in reading and math for adults who have that need.

 

The existing 21st Century Community Learning Center’s Grant utilizes the grant funding to supplement current programming and not supplant afterschool funding sources at BCSD. It is through the above-mentioned partnerships that the PIECES program exists and will exist beyond our current or proposed application grant period. In Form Previous Sustainability Planning, BCSD documents the number of partnerships that contributed to PIECES over the past five years. On an annual basis, the 40 existing partners of PIECES has contributed $101,431.24 in volunteer time, staff, supplies, facilities, equipment, and in-kind donations. Community service organizations such as Burlington Kiwanis, Rotary, and the Lion’s Club collaborate with PIECES to sustain our programs through both financial contributions and volunteerism. BCSD is committed to our afterschool programming and annually contributes over $64,000 for the implementation of PIECES through staffing, building use, supplies, and management of the programs.

 

7.2 Engagement of Partners

PIECES has an established Advisory Council that works collaboratively with BCSD to support all of the district’s afterschool programming. The PIECES Advisory Council meets monthly, on the second Monday of every month to discuss program achievements, progress made toward meeting our objectives, student participation, as well as the capacity of the partnership to last beyond the grant. The Advisory Council and PIECES partners agreed to the PIECES programming at both sites beyond the first five years but also requested this application to supplement funding provided at the two sites. BCSD recruits Council members from the PIECES collaborative partners, parents of PIECES students, BCSD Administration, and student representatives. Through this partnership, Council members promote and encourage other organizations to donate time, resources, services, and funding to the extended day and summer programs. The organizations involved in the Council are committed to assisting the program’s sustainability beyond 21CCLC funding periods. If this application is funded, each of the joint applicant organizations will have representation on the Council and be intimately involved in outreach and sustainability of PIECES programming.

 

BCSD is committed to the engagement of our partners and students through school day, afterschool, and summer services offered to our students and families. BCSD has a Community Partner room in every building in the District where students and their family members can utilize community resources such as ADDS addictions and substance use services, Domestic Violence Intervention Program, Rape Victims Advocacy Program, Des Moines County Public Health’s free STD testing services, and individual or family therapy services through Young House Family Services. The addition of our school based health clinic to serve the medical and behavioral needs of our students, families, and staff is an added resource to our District over the past year. The availability of our 


partnership’s services, at no cost to our district or students, is a valuable resource for our families and PIECES students. Transportation can be a hurdle for our students receiving services and by bringing our partners into the schools both during, after, and in the summer our students gain access to them. The PIECES partners also gain important access to students and family clients that they might not be able to do without our collaborative effort.

Evaluation (10 possible points) 

BCSD does and will continue to conduct comprehensive program evaluation at the local level using an external evaluator, student advisory councils, as well as providing requested data and program information to the Iowa Department of Education.

The Iowa Afterschool Alliance has conducted site visits at our program the most recent occurring on October 25, 2021. IAA reported the following site observations: “You could really tell that the (students) liked coming there. Use of Conscious Discipline tactics during all points of programming. Evidence of youth voice in their ability to choose their jobs and lead a Q&A. Hands-on Minds-On activities. Use of EZ Reports for tracking and impact”. On January 4, 2020 we received a site visit based on literacy observations conducted by Crystal Hall (IAA) and Theresa Slaughter (IAA Coach). The overall evaluation concluded, “Overall, level of staff competency, engagement of kids, and program management are consistent in providing a conducive learning environment.” Crystal Hall further comments, “We saw some really great things including best practices and promising practices”. It is important that we have site visits and feedback on the positive and the improvements that our program can make. This will continue on an annual basis as we believe evaluation is a key component to student and staff development and improvements.

 

8.1 Local Evaluation

Previous Local Evaluation PIECES programming over the past years has met all grant-specified requirements and state mandates. Both Grimes and Sunnyside building’s regular PIECES attendees have shown academic improvement on assessment scores in reading and math with increasing improvements year over year as evidenced by our local evaluations and fall to spring FAST and iREADY assessments. ISASP is also taken yearly but due to the COVID pandemic we do not have comparable data from 2019 to 2020. Local evaluations listed on the BCSD website (https://www.bcsds.org/District/Portal/21st-century-pieces) discuss the grant outcome of student risk factor improvements including improving school day attendance and school day behaviors. Our local evaluator works with our Grant Supervisor on a yearly basis to ensure that our program is meeting objectives and makes recommendations for program improvement. In our 2017-2018 Local Evaluation, it was written “Another success of note is that program data provides evidence that the program is making growth both in infrastructure and student achievement. …Attendance has risen, total partnerships has risen, and 82% of parents responding to the parent survey say that they feel like they have a greater role in their child’s academics as a result of the PIECES program”.

 

In 2020, BCSD has contracted with a local evaluator from the University of Iowa, Miriam Landsman, PhD, MSW. Dr. Landsman has the experience necessary to conduct a comprehensive, rigorous evaluation of PIECES effectiveness both at a local level and in cooperation with the Iowa Department of Education. Dr. Landsman is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Work and the Executive Director of the National Resource Center for Family Centered Practice. She is also the Co-Director of the Iowa Consortium for Substance Abuse Research and Evaluation. Dr. Landsman’s primary areas of research are family-centered approaches to child welfare practices and the developmental of the child welfare workforce. She has experience in organizational consultation, program evaluation, and family-centered practices. We selected Dr. Landsman based on her recommendation from the Iowa Afterschool Alliance and her goal of family-centered approaches and mental health foundation. The 21CCLC Grant Supervisor for BCSD, Cassie Gerst, will provide all necessary data and information to Dr. Landsman and as requested by the Iowa Department of Education. Dr. Landsman’s contact information is miriam-landsman@uiowa.eduand Ms. Gerst’s contact information is cassie.gerst@bcsds.org.

 

8.2 Measuring Program Results

BCSD has several instruments in place to measure PIECES effectiveness, progress toward meeting our grant objectives, and student program satisfaction. BCSD utilizes EZ Reports web-based software for managing the current 21CCLC grant and will continue to do so with the new grant proposal. EZ Reports software meets federal Department of Education and state reporting requirements for 21CCLC grant funded programs. EZ Reports imports student demographic information from BCSD’s Infinite Campus system, tracks student activities, student enrollment, and student attendance in PIECES programming. The Grant Supervisor utilizes EZ Reports to monitor and track multiple site’s programming in one central location, run real-time reports by grant or by site, generate an Annual Performance Review report for use by the local evaluator and federal Tactile system, and provide detail reports on daily and monthly student contact time. EZ Reports helps our evaluator collect data directly from one location instead of relying on staff spreadsheets, can monitor or review real-time program data, and can generate reports needed for federal and state Department of Education requirements.

 

BCSD uses Infinite Campus to record school day grades, school day attendance, office referrals, behavior and disciplinary reports, parent contact information, student demographics, missing school day assignments, and student medical information. Infinite Campus reports can be downloaded and then inputted into BCSD’s EZ Reports system by the Grant Supervisor on a monthly, daily, or as needed basis. While Infinite Campus does not contain Iowa Assessment data, individual Principals do have data tools that record and can be shared with the Grant Supervisor.

 

To measure student effectiveness and satisfaction with the PIECES program, BCSD will utilize a student survey through a Google Form that measures student satisfaction in a format that is both grade and age appropriate. The student survey looks at the following factors that affect program quality: appropriate structure; physical and psychological safety; developmental relationships; opportunities to belong; positive social norms; support of efficacy and mattering; opportunities for skill building; integration of family, school, and community; and youth viewpoints on asset-rich nature of their school, program, and peers. We have included an attachment with a table outlining the measurements as they correspond to the grant objectives and goals with timelines and measurement instruments.

 



8.3 Measure of Effectiveness for previous grantees- last two year’s local objectives

2019-2020: 5/6 local objectives were met this grant year. One local objective was that 75% of parents would report greater involvement in the child’s education as a result of participation in PIECES. 74.6% of parents reported this objective being met.

2020-2021: 2/4 local objectives were met this grant year. Our objective is that 50% of students would demonstrate improved social-emotional development. Our survey data indicated that 35% of students improved in the teacher survey. However, 85% of the students reported that they improved getting along better with friends. The other unmet objective was that parent involvement in their child’s education. The goal was 75% and in 2020-21 we resulted in 57%.

 

We do believe that the local objective not being met on parent involvement in their child’s education was in direct correlation to the COVID pandemic not allowing in-person parent engagement events in our building. Another COVID pandemic influence was the school year having school in virtual, two days hybrid per week, and no Friday school for most of the school year. Student’s social-emotional impact was negatively affected by the lack of personal connection and socialization. This lack of in-person school and program also negatively affected the parents feeling engaged in their child’s education.

Budget Narrative (10 possible points) 

9.1 Justification of Alignment of Proposed Activities

The estimated budget is based on the daily cost for services as outlined by the Funding Formula Template provided by the Iowa Department of Education. To meet the funding standards of $7.50 per student per day of an afterschool only program the following budget narrative provides explanation for Appendix D2 and D3.

 

Under the Authorized Activity Category:

Category 1: Program:

Personnel (72%): The PIECES program is evaluated on improving academic skills in reading and math according to student’s grades and ISASP. It will also measure attendance, social, and behavioral goals of students. Therefore, it is important to provide as many resources as possible that are student-centered and focused on student achievement and well-being of the whole child. For the student to successfully develop, it is crucial to have continuity between the school day and the extended day after school programming for the highest gain of academic achievement. For this intensive academic instructional focus, PIECES will recruit BCSD school day teachers and associates to be part of the after school program. BCSD teachers and associates know the curriculum being taught during the school day, know BCSD students, and are going to be able to provide a seamless transition for continued instructional time outside of school hours. In order to recruit certified teachers and associates, the largest portion of the grant is for personnel. The personnel line item includes a K-8 Site Coordinator who will coordinate curriculum that will seamlessly transition from school day to after school as well as provide necessary professional development related to school day lessons and instructional coaching for additional PIECES staff. The line item includes a Support Staff person at each site who is trained in Conscious Discipline approach to classroom management and can offer additional support for student self-regulation. This line item also includes program staff that can include certified teachers, certified associates, professional youth development specialists, youth workers, and family literacy educational support.

Materials & Supplies (5%): Materials for the PIECES program include: USDA approved nutritional snacks, family literacy events, field trips, STEM supplies, MindWorks project curriculums, and necessary supplies to implement student activities. Activity and project supplies include items such as: crayons, glue, markers, yarn, LEGOs, Snap Circuits, science supplies, recreation supplies, art supplies, enrichment supplies that coincide with academic focus activities (books, dice, chess boards). Family literacy and engagement implementation including food, reproducible, and books will also be part of this line item expense.

 

Category 2: PD (must be equal to or greater than 5%)

Professional Development (5%): Staff, partners, and volunteers involved in the PIECES program will have mandatory monthly training provided in cooperation with BCSD. PIECES Staff will participate in an initial training including information on policies, emergency procedures, positive youth development, conflict resolution, academic strategies, and social well-being strategies in working with elementary or high school students. The Site Coordinator will review staff handbooks with the staff along with expectations of students, parents, and volunteers. Ongoing professional development training will include access to the district’s professional development, specific training monthly for staff to learn and adjust strategies related to student needs, as well as review student objectives and growth. Training may include but is not limited to: non-violent crisis intervention, mandatory reporter training, Iowa Core training, Conscious Discipline and other district initiatives that would occur throughout the year.

 

Category 3: Student Access (up to 8%)

Student Access, Transportation (8%): PIECES after school programming will include student transportation from programming provided by the BCSD Transportation department (school bus and vans) or the City of Burlington’s Public Works department (City Bus). The cost of transportation to a student’s home following the after school programs supports parents who need transportation for their child to participate in the program. Where needed, the city bus will aid in the transportation of students. BCSD’s Transportation department will also supply bussing for our students and families on family engagement nights, field trips, and community partner events as needed. Transportation is a large need for our student and family population, including the cost of transportation in the budget allows additional student participation and increased parental participation.

 

Category 4: Evaluation (up to 4% of budget)
Evaluation (4%): A local, external evaluator will be contracted at $4,000 annually to conduct required state and local evaluations for PIECES at all six sites. This evaluation helps with the sustainability of the program, provides information to the PIECES Advisory Council and our community partners. The remaining evaluation line item allocation will be utilized for the expense of EZ Reports web-based software.

 


Category 5: Other Admin Costs (up to 8%)

Administration/Indirect Cost (6%): Indirect costs include general expenses required to operate PIECES programming at BCSD school buildings. These costs might include expenses associated with the use of computers, phone, internet, copiers, accounting services, janitorial services, heating and lighting.

 

9.2 Supplement not Supplant

21CCLC funding awarded to BCSD’s PIECES program for Grimes and Sunnyside will supplement the current running programs at both buildings beyond the end of the current grant cycle. When consulting the program stakeholders, PIECES Advisory Council, and our partners; the District is able to continue both after school programs but at less than the current running programs.

PIECES is able to continue without the 21stCentury Community Learning Center funding for another five years but only two days a week for approximately twenty students in grades K-4 with parents providing transportation. The supplement of the 21st Century Community Learning Center grant will provide funding which will allow BCSD and its partners to serve an additional 170 students, five nights a week for two and a half hours each night during the school days, with student participation in field trips and partner activities on non-school days. The grant funding would also allow us to provide transportation home for students after the program ends which is an important element for student participation and our working families.

Both site’s students also are provided inclusion in a district-wide mentoring program called Club M at no cost to the students. Club M program funding is provided through local foundations to operate a one-to-one youth mentoring program. This program will continue and not be supplanted by the 21CCLC grant but supplemented by this new grant project. It is intended that Club M will be part of the afterschool programing of PIECES but funded outside of this grant application.

The joint applicants of this application along with current community partners will continue partnerships with PIECES including financial contributions, volunteers, staffing, program activities, field trips, and family engagement and literacy activities. Students and families will have more opportunities for enrichment activities and extended partner opportunities for learning than without this grant opportunity. The 21CCLC funding in this application will supplement what the District is able to maintain without the grant by reaching 170 additional students, providing transportation, and having more contact time.

Supplemental Materials

Before School (BS) Site Operations

Estimated Start Date:

December 2, 2021

Estimated End Date:

December 3, 2021

Total Number of Service Days:

NA

Total hours of Before School services per typical week:

NA

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Saturday

NA

NA

NA

After School (AS) Site Operations

Total hours of After School services per typical week:

15.5

Total Number of Service Days:

152

Estimated End Date:

May 26, 2023

Estimated Start Date:

August 29, 2022

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

3:30 pm

3:30 pm

3:30 pm

3:30 pm

3:30 pm

6:00 pm

6:00 pm

6:00 pm

6:00 pm

6:00 pm

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.5

Saturday

9:00 am

12:00 pm

3

Summer (SUM) Site Operations

Monday 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Start Time 

End Time 

Hours 

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Saturday

NA

NA

NA

Estimated Start Date:

December 2, 2021

Estimated End Date:

December 3, 2021

Total Number of Service Days:

NA

Total hours of Summer services per typical week:

NA

Adult Family Member Services

All 21CCLC programs are required to host a minimum of four family-centered events each year. A general rule of thumb is one per quarter. Examples of events include back-to-school celebrations, literacy nights, family game nights, recreational events, guest speakers, and so on. 

Describe Frequency, Duration, and Dosage:

PIECES will host a minimum of four family nights throughout each year of the grant. They will occur once per quarter. In August we will have a welcome back kick-off event that is held annually at the Boy Scout facility at Camp Eastman. Our community partners are invited to lead student and family activities while our programs and resources are conducting orientations. In the second quarter we will have a Holiday event in partnership with the Art Center, Capitol Theater, and the Public Library which is called the Miracle of Jefferson Street. There are arts, story book reading, a movie, and many craft activities along the route. We also will have a family field trip to Mount Pleasant to see the annual Festival of Lights. In the third quarter we host a family event associated with literacy and family resources. For this event we partner with SCC to offer resources for families, literacy skill set, adult education and family reading time. Community Action of SE Iowa also participates to discuss resources available to families. The third quarter we partner with the local Rotary club for the Reading for Life program which encourages reading. Rotary partners with us to offer books for all of our students, volunteers to lead a book exchange, and SCC to offer literacy skills. The final quarter of the year we will host a closing celebration with students sharing projects they have worked on throughout the year, partner table displays, and summer enrichment recruitment.

Estimated Total Number of Adult Family Members Served:*
Total Number of Family Events*
School Name

James Wilson Grimes Elementary

4

200

Sunnyside Elementary

4

200

Form D1: 21CCLC Application Funding Request Summary
 

21CCLC TOTAL FUNDING REQUEST 

(Before and/or After School and Summer Program Funds) 

2

Number of program sites included in this application:

1702

Total number of students being served (all sites for one year):

$193,800

Total first-year funding request (all sites):

Total three-year funding request (all sites):

$581,400

FUNDING FOR EACH SITE INCLUDED IN THIS APPLICATION 

NOTE: A program site may serve students from many schools. For example, a location that serves students from three (3) different schools would be considered one Program Site. 

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

James Wilson Grimes Elementary

$96,900

$96,900

$96,900

$290,700

85

Sunnyside Elementary

$96,900

$96,900

$96,900

$290,700

85

School Year

Name of Program Site(s) 
Year 1 Funding Request 
Year 2 Funding Request 
Year 3 Funding Request 
Total Funding Request 
(3-year total) 
Number of Students Served per site per year 

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Summer School

Form D4: Applicant Agency’s Fiscal Resource Information 

It is recommended that each applicant, including school districts, public entities, or government agencies, possess sufficient fiscal resources in order to start up and operate the program being requested for a period of up to three months. Please indicate if you are a public entity or a private/non-profit by checking the appropriate box below and then use the text box at the bottom of the page to answer the questions regarding fiscal resources for start-up costs and operational costs. 

Public Entity

In the textbox below, please describe your funding sources that can be used to start up and operate the program for up to three months. For example, public entities should include their budget line item number, account numbers, or any other applicable references. Private organizations should describe cash, lines of credit, emergency loans, etc. Fiscal resource information should be specific (e.g., bank or lender names; name of the holder of the account).

 

* Note: If you do not have the financial resources available equal to the amount of funding you are requesting, you do not have the financial capacity for this project. Agencies that do not have adequate fiscal resources on hand are eligible to participate in the application process. However, the applicant must describe in this section the agency’s plan to secure the necessary fiscal resources for this program application. 

Burlington Community School District allocates a portion of the at-risk funds for the after school program, PIECES. The funding that is set aside for PIECES is to be used to support the program up to and including the start-up and operational costs for three months. The budget line item in the BCSD ledger for the at-risk funds is 10 9030 1000 1119 612.

To view Forms D2 and D3, click the "View Document" buttons below. PDF versions are included at the end of this document but the information may not be split into multiple pages. 
 

Basic Service Components

If location for the program is different from the school where children attend, list both below:

Sunnyside Elementary

School or Site/Building Name:

James Wilson Grimes Elementary

School or Site/Building Name:

School or Site/Building Name:
Do you plan to provide any of the following to meet the nutrition/food access needs of students?

Backpack program (https://www.foodbankiowa.org/backpack), Snack (required by federal statute)

Do you plan to follow best practices?

Yes, we will provide a free program to at-risk students in poverty as outlined in the guidance and consistent with the priority description in the application. All students on FRPL will attend for free. Best Practice is that applicants serve a minimum of 50% of FRPL children at each school in the application to receive the bonus points.

 
 

Site Information 

2022-2025 Site Profile 

Burlington Community School District

School/Agency Name:

School Name
(can apply for up to 3 sites) 
School-Wide Information 

Grades Served by School 

Total Enrollment 

Free and Reduced Lunch Rate 

# Targeted Students 

Grades Served by Program 

BS

AS

SUM

Target Schools

James Wilson Grimes Elementary

K-4

382

72.51

K-4

0

85

0

Sunnyside Elementary

K-4

255

50.59

K-4

0

85

00

Total:

0

170

0